Why buy FMJ handgun bullets?


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Armed012002
November 28, 2010, 02:42 AM
I'm surprised to see the difference in prices between JHP vs. FMJ.

.45 ACP per 1,000:

Remington 230 gr. .45 caliber FMJ $164
Winchester 230 gr. .45 caliber FMJ $174
Hornady 230 gr. .45 caliber FMJ $188
Hornady XTP 230 gr. .45 caliber JHP $198
Remington Golden Saber 230 gr. .45 caliber JHP $206
Speer Gold Dot 230 gr. .45 caliber JHP $300

9mm per 1,000:

Winchester 124 gr. 9mm FMJ $107
Remington 124 gr. 9mm FMJ $118
Hornady 124 gr. 9mm FMJ $132
Remington Golden Saber 124 gr. $127
Hornady XTP 124 gr. 9mm JHP $150
Speer Gold Dot 124 gr. 9mm JHP $205

Based on MidwayUSA prices, for $10 to $30 more you can buy XTP or Golden Saber bullets.

That's one to three cents more per bullet.

Why buy FMJ bullets when you can reload JHP for roughly the same price?

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918v
November 28, 2010, 02:48 AM
Some people are so cheap they would dig those FMJ's out of the berm and reuse them if they could.

TriTone
November 28, 2010, 03:22 AM
Some people are so cheap they would dig those FMJ's out of the berm and reuse them if they could.
Heck ya! Why not? hehe.

Also, why buy the more expensive bullets when its just ammo for practicing? Or am I missing something? Spending the money on HPs is just a waste as far as I can tell.

Jesse Heywood
November 28, 2010, 03:42 AM
Some people are so cheap they would dig those FMJ's out of the berm and reuse them if they could.

I got started reloading helping recover lead bullets when I was a kid. We called it using what we could afford. If we could shoot the same bullet two or three times we got to shoot two or three times as much.

JDGray
November 28, 2010, 08:34 AM
Why shoot Gold Dots into a dirt berm, when you can shoot FMJ for 1/2 the price??

I did HAVE to buy GDs for my Makarov, as thats all that was available at the time, but now lead is plentifull;)

KosmicKrunch
November 28, 2010, 08:47 AM
simply for lead in air contamination at indoor ranges. Plus some finicky pistols do not ramp load well with soft tip or lead. Some department and military only allow FMJ as well, so best to train with what is allowed. Also leading of the barrel can be a concern when using lead at high pressures. Otherwise, it is simply a matter of choice and ecoonomy.

Mxracer239y
November 28, 2010, 09:19 AM
You are asking the wrong question: Why spend 1-3 cents more, when I could load FMJ for less?

BacSi67
November 28, 2010, 09:32 AM
In NJ we have little choice. LOL
BacSi

cfullgraf
November 28, 2010, 09:33 AM
A 10 percent savings is 10 percent more shooting. Hollow points don't expand well when shot through paper.

Dodge DeBoulet
November 28, 2010, 09:34 AM
In my case, there are two reasons:



.45 230gr FMJ ball from Precision Delta is a helluva lot cheaper than what you've listed from other manufacturers above ($119 per 1K)
The weekly plate shoots at my range prohibit JHP due to their tendency for splashback on steel. And that's where most of my ammo dollar gets spent.

loadedround
November 28, 2010, 09:37 AM
Frankly because I am cheap! :)

FROGO207
November 28, 2010, 09:46 AM
I try to keep the most inexpensive projectile that is = to what I will be shooting for SD and FMJ with the same propellant in same weight is close enough. Otherwise it would be all lead or plated lead for my firearms.:D

ollifl
November 28, 2010, 10:09 AM
I buy Prec. D. 9mm/FMJ @77.00/1000, delivered. Let's see, if I buy 5000 it comes to around 400.00, Rem GS @ Midway is 127.00/1000 + s/h=~630.00 so I can actually buy almost 3000 more from PD for the same money.

Rollis R. Karvellis
November 28, 2010, 10:18 AM
You make recovering fired rounds sound like a bad thing.

Ditchtiger
November 28, 2010, 10:46 AM
One to three cents more per bullet times a thousand is $10 to $30.
And 1000 does not last me 1 month. Multiply that by 12 months and that 1 to 3 cents adds up.

hydraulicman
November 28, 2010, 10:56 AM
wow I have to load up some nice hollow points now. Especially in 9mm

hydraulicman
November 28, 2010, 10:59 AM
I always wonderd why people load hollow points that work like FMJ. Like montana gold. I hear they fly pretty well? If i'm loading JHP's i want some expansion.

jdh
November 28, 2010, 11:03 AM
Because some indoor ranges do not allow hollow point or lead bullets and require FMJ.

CraigC
November 28, 2010, 11:35 AM
Why shoot any of them when cast bullets are half as much???

buck460XVR
November 28, 2010, 11:45 AM
Saving 3 cents a round on bullets pays for the primer. Besides, at plinking velocities most hollow-points do not expand reliably anyway. Paper and bowling pins do not care at all what they get shot with, and since they are not an immediate threat, the whole penetration vs expansion thingy is moot.

snuffy
November 28, 2010, 12:19 PM
simply for lead in air contamination at indoor ranges. Plus some finicky pistols do not ramp load well with soft tip or lead. Some department and military only allow FMJ as well, so best to train with what is allowed. Also leading of the barrel can be a concern when using lead at high pressures. Otherwise, it is simply a matter of choice and economy.

Internet myth repeated enough times does NOT become fact! FMJ bullets have the lead base exposed to hot powder gases, so there goes your assertion that you're eliminating lead in the air. Actually, the HP bullet has a solid copper base, it would be better for less-lead shooting.

Properly cast and lubed lead boolits do not lead up a barrel. Either learn how to do it right, or stop bad-mouthing lead boolits.

If an auto pistol doesn't shoot HP or lead because of ramp problems, then get it fixed. A good pistol smith will polish or alter the feed ramp or magazines so it WILL shoot SWC, lead RN, or HP bullets.:scrutiny:

TH3180
November 28, 2010, 12:23 PM
Why spend the extra cash on Hollow points when I am just killing paper. If I decided to carry some day I will be using factory ammo as my carry ammo.

RustyFN
November 28, 2010, 12:29 PM
Why buy FMJ handgun bullets?

Because they kill cardboard and steel just as easy as JHP's for less money.

918v
November 28, 2010, 02:19 PM
JHP are more accurate than FMJ.

TH3180
November 28, 2010, 02:40 PM
Time to learn something.

JHP are more accurate than FMJ.

Why do you say that? Do you have links or anything that would explain more?

KBintheSLC
November 28, 2010, 02:50 PM
Less cost = more shooting. Heck, for putting holes in paper, I like to go even cheaper by using plated bullets. Got 1000 9mm for like $70 delivered, and 1000 .40 for about $90 delivered. Even if the cost difference between JHP and FMJ is small, it still makes sense to get the cheaper FMJ, cast lead or plated bullets if it is just for target practice. I do like to load my own defensive ammo though as well... so I tend to by both.

RustyFN
November 28, 2010, 04:19 PM
JHP are more accurate than FMJ.

Not enough to matter when you are only looking for minute of 8" steel plate.

orrwdd
November 28, 2010, 05:35 PM
JHP are more accurate than FMJ.
Anyone that knows anything about Aerodynamics or Fluid Dynamics would dispute this statement. If you compare the airflow over the smooth uninterrupted ogive of the FMJ to that of the JHP you would see that there would be air turbulence caused by the opening in the nose of the bullet. For this reason, it is not reasonable to make a blanket statement that the bullet surrounded by turbulent air is more accurate than the one with smooth airflow. In actuality the difference is exceedingly small, but definitely does not favor the JHP.

This myth is probably propagated by the fact that early benchrest shooters all shot JHP bullets. But it was more for the reason that back then the only bullets without a lead core exposed at the base was JHP.

PO2Hammer
November 28, 2010, 06:50 PM
Why buy jacketed ammo when you can get Berry's .45acp 185 plated SWC for $117/1,000?
BTW, shipping is included.
They shoot very, very well for me at 25 yards.

Hondo 60
November 28, 2010, 07:11 PM
Sometimes I shoot lead, just cuz it's cheaper than any other bullet.

I would prefer to shoot JHP all the time.
It keeps my hands & guns cleaner, but that's not realistic in my budget.

But I do like HP for SD/HD.

LightningMan
November 28, 2010, 07:19 PM
Why Buy FMJ bullets? because I'm not supposed to shoot lead bullets in my Kahr PM9 or P380. Also, I'm sure your not supposed to shoot lead through Glocks & HK's, as its about that polygonal rifling. So if I am just shooting at paper why pay extra for JHP bullets?

918v
November 28, 2010, 07:30 PM
Anyone that knows anything about Aerodynamics or Fluid Dynamics would dispute this statement. If you compare the airflow over the smooth uninterrupted ogive of the FMJ to that of the JHP you would see that there would be air turbulence caused by the opening in the nose of the bullet. For this reason, it is not reasonable to make a blanket statement that the bullet surrounded by turbulent air is more accurate than the one with smooth airflow. In actuality the difference is exceedingly small, but definitely does not favor the JHP.

This myth is probably propagated by the fact that early benchrest shooters all shot JHP bullets. But it was more for the reason that back then the only bullets without a lead core exposed at the base was JHP.


Your theory does not hold water in the real world. There is more to accuracy than how the bullet overcomes the air. Fact: most benchrest records have been set using hollowpoint bullets. Fact: nobody shoots FMJ in Bullseye competition. They all shoot SWC, HBWC, and JHP.

hydraulicman
November 28, 2010, 07:39 PM
if you have to ask . Your not shooting enough

CraigC
November 28, 2010, 07:47 PM
nobody shoots FMJ in Bullseye competition
Probably because they don't cut clean holes. Seriously, with handguns at handgun ranges, even if there 'was' a difference, it wouldn't be significant.

Owen Sparks
November 28, 2010, 07:49 PM
I prefer JHP's as they tend to deform when they hit things and are much less likely to carry a long distiance if they riccochet.

243winxb
November 28, 2010, 08:06 PM
Bullets that can be made in a single die using the punch cavity to
form the nose (no point forming die required)The FMJ takes 1 less forming step then a JHP. Faster production, lower price per unit. http://www.swage.com/ebooks/hb8-pix.pdf :)

rscalzo
November 28, 2010, 08:11 PM
In NJ we have little choice.

Learn the laws in your state . HP is perfectly acceptable for use in a range, home use and hunting.
N.J.S.A 2C:39-3f(1)

32dgrz
November 28, 2010, 08:12 PM
Try here for better FMJ prices
http://www.precisiondelta.com/product.php

918v
November 28, 2010, 08:49 PM
Probably because they don't cut clean holes. Seriously, with handguns at handgun ranges, even if there 'was' a difference, it wouldn't be significant.

In my testing JHP produce 50% tighter groups than FMJ. JHP are more forgiving. You may come across a FMJ load that equals JHP, but those are rare.

PO2Hammer
November 28, 2010, 09:28 PM
JHPs shoot more accurately for me than FMJs too.
It seems that any bullet with a reverse jacket, that is the open end at the front, shoot better than traditional FMJ, with the open jacket at the base.
Not sure of the technical reasons.

Pete D.
November 28, 2010, 09:48 PM
most benchrest records have been set using hollowpoint bullets. Fact: nobody shoots FMJ in Bullseye competition. They all shoot SWC, HBWC, and JHP.

A bit a disagreement. You really cannot compare HP rifle bullets to HP pistol bullets. I am surprised that the comment was made. HP rifle bullets have a hole in the nose (the hollow point) that is so small that it might as well be a solid tip. It is an artifact of the drawing process used to make the bullet.
JHP pistol bullets are a whole 'nother creature - they are made to expand (the rifle bullets aren't). Some of the larger JHPs are (or were) called "flying ashtrays" because of the size of the hollow.
Yes, people do shoot FMJ bullets in Bullseye matches. In fact, there is a whole division of Bullseye that allows nothing else. Attend an EIC/Leg match and FMJ ammo is the order of the day.
Mostly the other bullets are used because they 1) are lighter and produce less recoil 2) are easier to score.
Pete

wanderinwalker
November 28, 2010, 10:23 PM
JHPs shoot more accurately for me than FMJs too.
It seems that any bullet with a reverse jacket, that is the open end at the front, shoot better than traditional FMJ, with the open jacket at the base.
Not sure of the technical reasons.
I've always been told (and believe) the reason JHPs can fly better than FMJ is because the bases are more consistent. Where the base is the last part of the bullet to have contact with the rifling, it has a greater effect on accuracy than the consistency of the nose. What can I say, it's only what I have been told.

As for why shoot FMJ? Well, why would you if you can get lead bullets cheaper? Seriously, I shoot lead or plated bullets in my handguns because they are less expensive than traditional jacketed bullets. 1500 MBC .38 SWCs cost about $115, shipped to the postal box. Find me jacketed bullets that cheap! Also, for the Glocks with factory barrels, I use Berry's plated bullets. You can find these between $70-80 per 1000, shipped.

jdh
November 29, 2010, 12:14 AM
Internet myth repeated enough times does NOT become fact! FMJ bullets have the lead base exposed to hot powder gases, so there goes your assertion that you're eliminating lead in the air. Actually, the HP bullet has a solid copper base, it would be better for less-lead shooting.

Until it hits something. The small amount or lead that may or may not be expelled from the base of an open base FMJ bullet upon firing is insignificant compared to the the amount of lead contamination put into the air when a bullet with lead exposed at the nose impacts a solid object like a hard back stop, target frame, or steel target.

KosmicKrunch
November 29, 2010, 12:51 AM
Snuffy: 1. I shoot no lead exposed FMJ when required by the range, state or place. 2. I do not have the ramp issue, but some do, I shoot NO ramp revolvers LOL. Was not bad mouthing lead, I shoot a lot of lead when I can. Some ranges, places, states require no lead exposed bullets. As long as you are not pushing the lead HOT, yeah, they will NOT lead up the barrel. I shoot mild to mid-range, so I do not have a leading or coppering issue. I was answering the OPS question. I shoot for economy when I can and not required to do so otherwise.

243winxb
November 29, 2010, 08:13 AM
As a general rule, this is true. Originally Posted by 918v
JHP are more accurate than FMJ. Its in how the bullets are made/formed, plus a solid copper base is better formed than exposed lead bases. If you have a Bullseye 45acp pistol, it will need to group into a 3" 10 ring @50 yards. As most out of the box new auto pistols will not do this in there life time, the choice of bullet type by price makes sense. :)

MrOldLude
November 29, 2010, 10:24 AM
Internet myth repeated enough times does NOT become fact! FMJ bullets have the lead base exposed to hot powder gases, so there goes your assertion that you're eliminating lead in the air. Actually, the HP bullet has a solid copper base, it would be better for less-lead shootingOf course, there are some exceptions. Speer Lawman cartridges are TMJ. And the Berry's that I fire is totally plated.

cheygriz
November 29, 2010, 07:02 PM
I load FMJ because I like them! :p

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