HOW to KILL PRIMERS


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wditto
December 3, 2010, 12:29 AM
just wondered how to kill primers still in the case; can I set the case in WD-40 for a while and expect them to go dead?
any suggestions?
thankx

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bds
December 3, 2010, 12:32 AM
Why don't you just chamber in pistol/rifle without bullet/powder and go bang in the garage with the windows closed?

I do this demo with new reloaders I teach so they can see/hear the firing of primers (it's a loud pop).

You do know that you can deprime live primers?

wditto
December 3, 2010, 12:37 AM
yes, I do

Magoo
December 3, 2010, 12:38 AM
Not a definitive answer, but I've got a jar of motor oil collecting all of my questionable primers and unfire-able misprimmed brass. Some time in the future I expect to create a (safe) "time capsule" and dispose of it.

MrOldLude
December 3, 2010, 09:51 AM
http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot39.htm

oneounceload
December 3, 2010, 10:34 AM
Motor oil is iffy at best - shooting them works the best.....and is more fun......

Clark
December 3, 2010, 11:39 AM
Week Five:
All rounds fired just fine.

I have been reading one line about guns since before the www took off.

I have been reading about oil and primers for most of that time and only RECENTLY started reading that the oil does not change things.

Sometimes the gun culture mythology moves at a glacial pace.

Smokey Joe
December 3, 2010, 02:07 PM
W Ditto--and Magoo--This question has been debated to death on this and other fora.

The consensus is, that there is NO household chemical that will reliably kill 100% of primers. None.

There are horrid chemicals that undoubtedly would do the job (fuming nitric acid comes to mind) but all of those come with even more issues regarding safe handling, toxicity and cleanup. You don't want to go there.

Primers are 100% reliably killed by percussion or ignition. Toss 'em into a fire (and STAND BACK for pete's sake!!) and they will pop. Not recommended--repeat, NOT RECOMMENDED. Fire 'em in an appropriate firearm, and it's noisy and the firearm will want cleaning afterwards, but that works just fine. Or deprime the cases carefully--it works--put the unwanted primers on a rock or some such, and (wearing ear/eye/hand safety gear) hit 'em with a hammer. This worked even with a couple of primers that I somehow put into the cases sideways!

But water won't kill all your unwanted primers. Neither will bleach, WD-40, vinegar, cat urine, motor oil, dish detergent, Windex, paint thinner, nor any other household chemical. Sorry.

bkhosken
December 3, 2010, 02:16 PM
I have soaked primers in WD-40 and then drained them out and heated them in a screen topped can with a heat gun until they all went pop.

The pop after the WD-40 soaking is very mild and easy, if you heat them in a can without soaking they will all explode at once...and it will scare the crap out of you.

Shimitup
December 3, 2010, 02:21 PM
Send them to me, I'll be happy to do for you.:D

jimmyraythomason
December 3, 2010, 02:51 PM
I killed the powder charge in some .357 mag. ammo with WD-40. The rounds all fired with varying degrees of bang. All primers fired. One bullet lodged in the barrel of my Dan Wesson Model 15.

sig220mw
December 3, 2010, 03:49 PM
I tried the fire the primer in an empty case routine once. I'll never do it again. When I dropped the hammer the primer did indeed ignite and pop but it also backed out of the case and locked up the cylinder. Finally got the idea of placing a wooden rod in the barrel and tapping it down which knocked the primer back up into the pocket and was then able to take the case out.

Talked to gunsmith about it and before I finished telling him about it he said "and then your gun locked up, right?"

mallc
December 3, 2010, 06:46 PM
I tried the fire the primer in an empty case routine once. I'll never do it again. When I dropped the hammer the primer did indeed ignite and pop but it also backed out of the case and locked up the cylinder.

Just imagine what would have happened if that primer had been behind a full charge of powder!!

Scott

jcwit
December 3, 2010, 07:27 PM
I tried the fire the primer in an empty case routine once. I'll never do it again. When I dropped the hammer the primer did indeed ignite and pop but it also backed out of the case and locked up the cylinder.

That is normally what happens when there is no charge.

kennedy
December 3, 2010, 09:33 PM
I just deprime the case never had a problem

FROGO207
December 3, 2010, 09:44 PM
I rather enjoy using the anvil and 3 pound plug hammer. They go bang and that is the end of it. Just wear safety gear (doing it in the wintertime helps) and do one at a time and you will have fun. The other way is to toss a few into a good fire pit outdoors and retreat about 15 feet count the pops and stay away until all are cooked off.

TH3180
December 3, 2010, 10:01 PM
Why would you want to kill primers?

1SOW
December 3, 2010, 10:16 PM
I put in a new firing pin in my semi-auto and tested it with empty cases with primers. Mild pops out of a 4.7" bbl.

The problem comes when you have "square" primers due a bad pull on the press where they seated sideways.

I guess the hammer and anvil is the safest solution with a deformed primer.

ArchAngelCD
December 3, 2010, 10:17 PM
Just deprime the case if you don't want to shoot the primer dead.

1SOW
December 3, 2010, 11:37 PM
...:D

medalguy
December 3, 2010, 11:40 PM
Yep. I deprime live primers all the time. Well, not ALL the time, but I load a lot and there's always a few that don't seat right, or get sideways or whatever. I just slowly deprime them and toss the primers into the garbage can and reuse the brass. Never had a problem with a single one.

918v
December 4, 2010, 02:16 AM
Murdering primers is wrong.

Deprime them and use them for plinking, or load the brass and fire them, but don't let them go to waste.

RustyFN
December 4, 2010, 12:04 PM
Murdering primers is wrong.

Deprime them and use them for plinking, or load the brass and fire them, but don't let them go to waste.

Yep, what he said.

06
December 4, 2010, 12:35 PM
Just send me your old worthless corroded out of date primers and I will dispose of them for you. That is what friends are for-lol.:D

Smokey Joe
December 4, 2010, 10:34 PM
Th 3180--You asked:Why would you want to kill primers?Which is a reasonable question. Once in a while--a long long while, it is to be hoped, I press a primer into a case sidewise. (Yeah, I should notice the extra effort needed, but I've gotten 'em all the way in, anyhow. :( ) Such primers are ruined and obviously need to be disposed of safely. Other times I've removed primers have been after mistakenly inserting magnum primers into cases I meant to load with non-magnum loads, and similar situations. Mostly I just remove and kill the primers after a goof like that, rather than load up a series of magnum loads I wasn't planning on.

Now: Why not re-use the primers correctly, after removing them from the mistakes? When first inserted into a primer pocket, the primers are swaged smaller to fit very snugly into that pocket. If removed and re-inserted, the primer will hold the second pocket less snugly I believe (having been swaged twice) which could lead to a backed-out primer upon firing. Not the worst thing in the world, unless in a revolver or an autoloader, but still...

I once took a set of removed primers, seated them correctly in the correct cases, loaded the cases, took 'em to the range and fired 'em, and every one went bang, none backed out, and the POI seemed to be the same as for once-loaded primers. But still...

I guess for me, the bottom line is, each primer gets seated once. If seated correctly, in the correct case, it gets its case loaded and fired normally. If seated incorrectly, well, it just had its once--It's done. I try to keep that as rare an occurrence as possible, and primers are not so expensive that I can't just discard them after the initial seating, whether fired or not.

YM, as they say, MV.

jcwit
December 4, 2010, 11:35 PM
Now: Why not re-use the primers correctly, after removing them from the mistakes? When first inserted into a primer pocket, the primers are swaged smaller to fit very snugly into that pocket. If removed and re-inserted, the primer will hold the second pocket less snugly I believe (having been swaged twice) which could lead to a backed-out primer upon firing. Not the worst thing in the world, unless in a revolver or an autoloader, but still...



Wrong, the powder charge going off will seat the primer flush with either the recoil shield "in the case of a revolver" or the bolt in an automatic or rifle.. This is why a primer with no powder charge backs out and a cartridge with an overcharge gives a flattened primer. One of the signs on an overcharge.

swiftak
December 5, 2010, 07:21 AM
Is this going the route of how to get rid of a .22 cartridge that was found at the range?

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