Red vs Blue Progressives


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griff383
December 10, 2010, 10:47 AM
So I finally decided to step up to a progressive press. Im still keeping my turret and single presses for the stuff I dont shoot alot and for hunting loads. Primary desire for a progressive right now is:

-9mm
-40
-223 trim / resize
-308 trim / resize

I looked at the Hornady LNL AP and the Dillon XL 650 and saw benefits to both. Price difference in presses as well as accesories isnt enough to make me lean towards either. I will wait on the case feeder as I dont see that as a necesity right now but will probably get one sometime in the future. I did like the trimmer from Dillon that fits right on top of the press and think that would make my 223 and 308 processing much easier.

Is there any benefit to one over the other, diregarding cost of press / accessories?

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RustyFN
December 10, 2010, 11:25 AM
This might help. It is a comparison from somebody that owns both.
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1292415

BigJakeJ1s
December 10, 2010, 01:18 PM
Either progressive will reload your pistol cartridges very well, especially if you intend to crank out mind-numbing quantities of exactly the same load (same bullet/powder/etc.). If you tend to load a few hundred, then change the bullet and/or powder and load another few hundred, the LNL is more flexible, unless you want to set up entire tool heads with powder measures for each load on the 650.

The 650 is less easy to use without a case feeder than the AP, especially if you are only trimming and resizing on it (not seating bullets.) You feed cases manually, up high at the top of a tube, with the right hand on the 650, which also operates the handle. You feed cases with the left hand on the AP and operate the handle with the right hand.

If you ever intend to completely reload rifle cartridges on the progressive, AP powder measure works better with extruded rifle powders than the 650 PM. The AP PM also works in any station, which may allow you to size, trim, charge, seat and maybe even crimp (depending on how much room the trimmer takes next to the PM). Individual dies are also easily changed on the AP, allowing you flexibility in the choice of sizing, expanding, seating and crimp dies.

Changing primer sizes is much easier on the AP than on the 650.

I have heard that the 650 will also not work with redding competition (and probably other sliding sleeve type) seating dies for 30-06 or longer cartridges (the auto-index engages before the seated bullet clears the bottom of the sleeve).

Andy

k4swb
December 10, 2010, 01:50 PM
Glock!


Sorry. I just couldn't help myself.

raz-0
December 10, 2010, 03:43 PM
I can tell you right now that if you see loading a lot of .40 in your future, the LNL case feeder design has had some severely bad choices made in materials, and some seriously wrong recommendations made as to what parts to use to make it work with .40.

mallc
December 10, 2010, 07:17 PM
Dillon 650 is the better all-around press. The operating linkages are much more solid and safety checks are well integrated. Change overs are slow and dedicating tool heads is pricey. A case feeder is a necessity to maximize a 650.

Hornady LNL AP is a dream of simplicity. Change overs are fast, powder measure is better, and once you get the hang of checking all the stages at each stroke, it is fast. RCBS Lockout dies work for straight wall cases. RCBS Powder Cop work (sort of...if you turn the check rod upside down) with bottle neck cases. Case feeder linkages are flimsy and I wouldn't spend the money to add one.

Dillion 650 produces ammo faster with a higher margin of safety if you add the bells and whistles. Hornady is flexible and more fun but takes A LOT more attention.

Both are great companies. After 5 years on Dillon and 3 years on Hornady, I haven't needed any service.

Forget trimming on either unless you use a Dillion RT 1200.

Redding Competition Seating dies work on both. I use them for .223, 22-250, 30.06, and 40 SW on both. Redding dies won't fit in Redding dies boxes with LNL bushings installed.

Hope this helps.

Scott

griff383
December 10, 2010, 07:19 PM
So if the LNL case feeder has issues with 40, can the Dillon case feeder be used in conjunction with the Hornady press?

mallc
December 10, 2010, 07:33 PM
So if the LNL case feeder has issues with 40, can the Dillon case feeder be used in conjunction with the Hornady press?

I once knew a guy who successfully put a Porsche 914 pancake in a Corvair. Never did understand why he didn't just drive the Porsche.

Scott

griff383
December 10, 2010, 08:24 PM
I dont mind if it takes a few minutes to change calibers or if I have to load the cases into the tube manually so long as I can load a handful at a time. What I am trying to eliminate is 4 pulls to make 1 bullet

cfullgraf
December 10, 2010, 08:38 PM
Redding dies won't fit in Redding dies boxes with LNL bushings installed.



Actually, I don't think any die with the Hornady L-N-L bushing will fit in a Redding die box.

Dies do fit in RCBS boxes with trimming one of the saddles that hold the dies in place. I have swapped dies set around and purchased a couple extra RCBS boxes so that dies used on the Hornady progressive have a storage box.

orionengnr
December 10, 2010, 09:52 PM
Since my first press was an inherited Dillon RL450 (30-ish years old, three years ago) and I recently inherited an older Hornady Pro-7 (20-ish years old) I have what I hope is some valid input.

Dillon still supports the 450, and parts are still available (and they sent me everything I needed free of charge, of course).

When I recently contacted Hornady for primer tubes/primer blast shield/shell plates, they said, no, we don't have them, no, we can't tell you where to get them, you really need to buy a new LNL. I have been searching eBay, etc, to find the parts...no luck yet. So it sits idle. I may put it on eBay soon (I've seen several sell recently, without primer tubes...imagine that)

You may not keep your press for 20 years. On the other hand, you may hand it down to your son. If it's a Dillon, he will still be able to use it. The difference in philosophy between the two companies seals the deal for me.

Planned obsolescence is okay for toasters and cell phones.

Since you are in the DFW area, want to buy a Hornady pro 7 (minus primer tubes) cheap? :) Nah, didn't think so...

rfwobbly
December 10, 2010, 11:10 PM
I always wondered if the Dillon powder measure/ case expander system would make the LNL AP a better machine. Most all the trouble I see with the LNL is credited to case belling issues. I simply love the way my Dillon handles that portion of the loading.

griff383
December 11, 2010, 12:00 AM
Im really starting to lean towards the blue koolade. But if my wife isnt looking I may end up with both.

mallc
December 11, 2010, 10:26 AM
Im really starting to lean towards the blue koolade. But if my wife isnt looking I may end up with both.

That'll work!

Scott

floydster
December 11, 2010, 10:36 AM
I have the LNL E-Z ject, and priming on this press is just a royal pain, any little speck of media or any other unforseen material on the primer slider and you can get a hangup.
Believe me, I have tried to no avail to solve this problem, it is in my opinion a very poor design, my Son is a mech. engineer and he picked this think apart.
Buy the Dillon!

Walkalong
December 11, 2010, 12:16 PM
I don't think any die with the Hornady L-N-L bushing will fit in a Redding die box.I buy the cheap Lyman box (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=451010) for them. Hornady sells a hinged box (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=154430)that will work, and hold four dies, but they are more money.

cheygriz
December 11, 2010, 01:10 PM
go big blue!

Ian Sean
December 11, 2010, 04:16 PM
Just my opinion, Red and Blue have their negatives and positives. Any problem can be worked out (and usually the cause is the owner) and both have good customer service. You really won't go wrong with either brand, so it may well boil down to cost and if you can find the best deal.

But I would still recommend researching everything about each that you can.

I am a big fan of this guys website, he owns every brand and has some great critiques of each unit. http://ultimatereloader.com/

It is a big investment, be prepared to "invest" a good day or two reading on his site. If you prefer the visuals and actual workings of the units, I would recommend watching the videos he has posted on Youtube also. http://www.youtube.com/user/gavintoobe#p/u/36/cID-c9jM6gQ

Hope I helped and Good luck.

mallc
December 11, 2010, 04:23 PM
You really won't go wrong with either brand,

IMHO, you WILL go wrong if you expect either to do what the other does.

Scott

griff383
December 11, 2010, 04:47 PM
Ian,

Great info and links, Im in no hurry to get one so I have the time to research properly. That plus the vault keeper (wife) probably wouldnt like me spending money on something other than christmas stuff right now.

cfullgraf
December 11, 2010, 05:03 PM
I buy the cheap Lyman box (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=451010) for them. Hornady sells a hinged box (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=154430)that will work, and hold four dies, but they are more money.

I'll have to look into the Lyman box. It looks like the RCBS box from the picture. Down side is I live in Big Orange Country and I'm not a fan of the Tennessee Volunteers.:)

I like the sizes of the RCBS and Redding boxes. The Hornady box is too big for my storage system as is the Forester.

But it is definitely personal opinion. What ever floats your boat.

RustyFN
December 11, 2010, 05:05 PM
IMHO, you WILL go wrong if you expect either to do what the other does.

Scott I would be curious to know what one will do that the other won't. I have talked to at least 12 people that own both and 90% prefer the Hornady over the Dillon.

Walkalong
December 11, 2010, 05:14 PM
I have plenty of RCBS die boxes, some with other brand dies in them, or a mismatched set. My 9MM die set is in an RCBS box. It consists of a Lee or Redding sizer. The Redding is in there right now, with a Redding expander, a Hornady seater with the micrometer stem, and a C&H crimper.

As a Tide fan, I can understand the aversion to orange. ;)

Both presses have lots of loyal and satisfied users. Assuming feeding cases by hand, I prefer the ergonomics of the Hornady. If I went Dillon, it would be a 650 with a case feeder.

Most all the trouble I see with the LNL is credited to case belling issuesI use my regular expanders in station #2. I could do it in station #1 since I am not sizing when loading them. (Size them, hand prime them, load them)

mallc
December 11, 2010, 05:50 PM
Scott I would be curious to know what one will do that the other won't. I have talked to at least 12 people that own both and 90% prefer the Hornady over the Dillon.

I'm sure we've hashed this over and over and over - but we can do it again for a LEE Turret-man if you like.

For the record, in addition to the 650XL, we have two LNL APs, one set up for large primers and one for small. We use a T7 for small batches and have a few other presses for special duty; for example we've installed Dillon 1200 RT trimmers on a couple of old RCBS cast iron Reloader Specials to size/trim .223 and 5.7x28. Different types of presses perform various reloading tasks better than others.

1. The LNL does not have an effective hi/low charge alarm.
2. The LNL does not have a low primer alarm, the chase rod drops into the slide and stops the action and spilled powder jams up the slide.
3. The LNL timing prawls need to be tweaked more often than I like.
4. LNL has a better powder measure than the 650 but not as good as the Redding next to the T7.
5. Working up loads would by a PIA on either.
6. Pulling bullets would be a PIA on either
7. Manual trimming would be a PIA on a 650
8. Running 600 .223 an hour safety on an LNL is difficult and not possible on a turret or single stage.
9. Dillon has far better construction and linkages.

IMHO the LNL isn't in the same class as the 650XL but you don't need a 650XL for what the LNL does well - AND - you don't need either to make up 20 rounds of 25.06 - BUT - you certainly could do so iff'n ya only had one press to do it on.

Scott

orionengnr
December 11, 2010, 06:27 PM
As I said in Post #11, the biggest problem with Hornady is that when they come up with a new press, they will quit supporting the LNL...just as they did with the Pro-7 and the Pro-Jector.

I cannot find primer tubes or primer blast shield for the Pro-7 I inherited, new or used, for love or money. Three of the last four Pro-7s that I have seen on eBay had no primer tubes or primer blast shield. The one that did went for ~$120...two are available now, each going about $60. Hornady's response? "Just buy an LNL". Thanks. :rolleyes:

Mine is esentially useless, unless I hand-prime. (If you have any of these parts for sale, please pm me. I'd rather use it than sell it. I won't get anything for it anyway.)

You can still buy an old Dillon 450 or (pre-550B) 550, leave it like it is and get support/parts, or buy parts to upgrade it to 550B.

Walkalong
December 11, 2010, 07:11 PM
5. Working up loads would by a PIA on either.I'll have to disagree with that one. I run small batches all the time on mine. No worries. Of course I don't have to set up the expander and measure each time the way I do it.

EddieNFL
December 11, 2010, 07:49 PM
FWIW, of 230 respondents to a survey at the 2010 IDPA nationals, 199 used Dillons so they are obviously doing something right.

I don't post this as a knock against Hornady. I have a Red machine to provide some contrast with the Blue. It has served me well.

RustyFN
December 11, 2010, 09:29 PM
I'm sure we've hashed this over and over and over - but we can do it again for a LEE Turret-man if you like.

Just because I'm a Lee turret man doesn't mean I won't be upgrading to one of these some day in the near future. I would like to hear real experiences from people that have actually used both, that's why I asked you. Thanks for the reply.

MickKennedy29
December 11, 2010, 09:49 PM
I have used both my buddy's Dillon 650 and my own Hornady LnL AP. They are both solid machines and either one will last a lifetime or two. I think that the Dillon is more "heavy duty" than the Hornady, at least it appears that way to me. That's not to say that the Hornady isn't sturdy, it is and then some. My preference is the Hornady for two reasons. One is the primer feed system. On the Dillon a new primer is fed everytime the handle is pulled, case or no case. The Hornady only drops a new primer after a case has been primed. The second reason is because caliber changes are easier on the Hornady. There are things I like better on the Dillon, but due to those 2 things I would buy the Hornady again over the Dillon if I needed a second.

KosmicKrunch
December 11, 2010, 09:54 PM
I have a red set up....and a few green accessories. I even have a yellow Redding I use just for crimping. My dies are all Red carbide 4 die sets.

mallc
December 12, 2010, 10:45 AM
just because I'm a Lee turret man doesn't mean I won't be upgrading to one of these some day in the near future.

Just a friendly jab Rusty. Probably half my posts have been on this topic. Besides, I'm betting you've got way too much reserve outta that 8 ball turret to worry about changing presses now.

Merry Christmas Bud!

Scott

griff383
December 12, 2010, 11:17 AM
I cut my teeth on the LEE turret and probably wont ever sell it. It will be nice to have to work up loads so that when I get ones I like I can transfer them over to the progressive.

This is alot of good info and alot of back and forth between the two presses. This is exactly what I was looking to get out of my question.

RustyFN
December 12, 2010, 11:30 AM
Merry Christmas Bud!

Thanks Merry Christmas to you. I haven't been able to shoot enough to justify the upgrade yet but hopefully in the near future. I have loaded on a friends 550 and thought it was a very nice press. I need to go over and try his 650 but am afraid because he just bought a Super 1050. :D Wish I knew somebody that had a LNL I could try.

mallc
December 12, 2010, 01:21 PM
Wish I knew somebody that had a LNL I could try.

Come on over! We'll have coffee and egg nog and load a 1000 or so.

Scott

griff383
December 12, 2010, 02:03 PM
Scott, I almost wish I was heading home for the holidays. I could make a pit stop along the way and see your LNL

griff383
December 12, 2010, 02:09 PM
Something else I forgot to ask, what comes with each press? With the LNL do I need anything besides dies to get it running? The Dillon comes ready to run as I understand with chosen caliber when ordered.

mallc
December 12, 2010, 03:07 PM
If you currently reload all you'll need is a shellplate for each caliber you plan to load on the LNL.

I believe the LNL comes with 5 lock bushings. You'll need one for the powder measure and one for each die in your setup. Some folks buy extra bushings and some don't.

You might want the pistol micrometer for small precise charges.

You'll want to check out this site for powder through expander adaptor: http://www.powderfunnels.com/ or Hornady sells set. Some folks use a regular flair in two and charge in three.

I use RSBC Power Cop for bottle neck cases and RSBS Lockout for straight walled cases.

Hornady sells a slick powder dump which fits into the rotating cylinder to facilitate changing powders - I highly recommend it.

That should about do it.

Scott

GIJOEL
December 12, 2010, 09:25 PM
I have grown up loading on dillon presses since I was 13 (now 26). I've used lee and RCBS among others and always thought that my dillon 650 (with case feeder) was just the nicest, slickest, and best built machine ever. That said I haven't used the LNL, I'm sure its a good press, but I doubt the customer service would be nearly as good.

Redbeard55
December 14, 2010, 05:58 PM
I have a Blue Press. Friend has a Red Press. He has used my Blue Press, but I have not used his Red Press. According to the friend, the Red presses run smoother but tolerances can be somewhat sloppy. If you don't fine tune adjustments on Blue Press, they can run somewhat bumpy

BYJO4
December 14, 2010, 08:09 PM
The current LNL AP comes with both rifle and pistol rotors and metering assemby. The new Hornady PTXs work fine for expansion and flare and cost less the powder funnel mentioned above. In addition to the press, you need to order shell plate for given caliber, PTX (if you want to expand & drop powder in same station so you get use a powder check die), and a powder check die (suggest RCBS Lock Out) if you that added safety feature. I assume you already have dies, scale, caliper, etc.

MickKennedy29
December 17, 2010, 03:43 PM
Griff383, I live in Dallas and would not mind at all if you wanted to check out the LnL. I am not sure how far apart we are. I live in North Dallas, in the Lake Highlands area. Shoot me an email at mickkennedy29@gmail.com if you want to check it out.

joed
December 19, 2010, 09:26 AM
Dillon still supports the 450, and parts are still available (and they sent me everything I needed free of charge, of course).

When I recently contacted Hornady for primer tubes/primer blast shield/shell plates, they said, no, we don't have them, no, we can't tell you where to get them, you really need to buy a new LNL. I have been searching eBay, etc, to find the parts...no luck yet. So it sits idle. I may put it on eBay soon (I've seen several sell recently, without primer tubes...imagine that)

You may not keep your press for 20 years. On the other hand, you may hand it down to your son. If it's a Dillon, he will still be able to use it. The difference in philosophy between the two companies seals the deal for me.

Planned obsolescence is okay for toasters and cell phones.

This is one of the things I haven't liked about the Hornady press. Ten years ago when I bought my first progressive I looked long and hard at the Hornady. At the time I was considering buying the Hornady needed 2 stages to load powder. One belled the case and the next poured the powder thus accomplishing in 5 stages what the 550 did in 4.

Sometime after I bought the Dillon Hornady made a change to combine the two steps. Then a few years ago Hornady made a shellplate change to help with ejecting loaded rounds. I heard a lot of whining from Hornady owners about the cost of changing over and the wait for the new style plates.

The Hornady press seems to be constantly changing where the Dillon is rock solid design.

But I don't like the idea that Hornady drops a press and will no longer support it. I've had an RCBS rock chucker for 30 years and 2 Dillon presses for 10 years. For what the progressive presses cost I'd hate to hear the words "We no longer support that model".

Just reenforces my Dillon decision.

greyling22
December 19, 2010, 10:53 AM
I read this article a while back and thought it was a very good read. It's a comparison of an xl650, LNL ap, and a loadmaster by a guy who seems pretty unbiased. in the end he settled on the LNL ap.


http://www.comrace.ca/cmfiles/dillonLeeHornadyComparison.pdf

joed
December 19, 2010, 12:20 PM
I have spent a lot of time on another forum where a lot of the members purchased the LnL over the Dillon. They aren't without their problems. I see complaints on timing issues and primer seating. Some go so far as to seat primers using a hand tool and then putting them in the press. To me that's not why I bought a progressive. If I had to prime my cases not using the press I'd get rid of the press.

Back when Hornady changed the shell plate I got a lot of digs in because they complained about waiting months for the new plates and then the cost of converting what they already had.

The biggest reason I can see for not going Hornady is the older models they won't support anymore. History may repeat itself again and I don't want to be on the losing end.

BigJakeJ1s
December 19, 2010, 10:04 PM
If you are the kind of person who buys extended warranties, you'll be happy paying extra for Dillon progressive presses; they come with one. The others don't, but don't charge you for it either.

Dillon no longer supports the old powder measure that worked on any station, and did not need a down-rod. Dillon no longer supports (and hasn't for at least 15 years) press models before the 450 or the 1050. They also no longer replace 450 frames, except with 550 frames that have the loose tool heads (the reason many users hang onto their 450's).

I personally know two 550 users that hand prime every case because the on-press-primer is too hard to keep running right. It is continually gunked up with spent primer residue. Then there are the Dillon users who complain about the spring-ball-detent being too stiff and spilling powder from charged cases, the spent primer catcher missing spent primers, not to mention the squibs and double charges enabled by a manually indexed press with no station for a powder check die. If you really want to believe that only non-Dillon progressives have problems, you probably can; just close your eyes.

Andy

Hondo 60
December 19, 2010, 10:50 PM
Well, let me put it this way.
I have 4 presses.
1 - Lee Single stage
1 - Lee Turret
1 - Lee pro 1000
1 - Dillon 550

Once I tried the Dillon, I don't think I'll be doing much on the Lee presses.
I've used my Dillon for 38 spl, 357 mag & 45 Colt.
While it hasn't been perfect, the Dillon is just buttery smooth compared to the Lee presses.
After Christmas I'll be getting 2 more toolheads - one for 9mm & one for 223.

Tim the student
December 27, 2010, 02:45 AM
Anyone have anything to add to this?

robctwo
December 27, 2010, 10:05 AM
I have about 140,000 through my LnL. Had to send it to the factory for a fix at about 85,000, the set screws holding the base plate wouldn't stay tight. Complete rebuild for $0.

My auto index star broke at about 130,000, so I got to, in effect, run a Dillon 550 for a week. Auto indexing is the way to go.

I do not use the case feeder. I load a lot of pistol, and change calibers regularly. 200 an hour lets me feel like i'm having fun. 300 is doable if I'm in a hurry. Any more is hard and no fun at all.

I have no experience on any Dillons. Lots of guys at my club have them. Most of the newer guys are going LnL.

rfwobbly
December 27, 2010, 10:59 AM
Andy -
The OP originally asked about the 650. Now you throw in 550 dis-information. Besides these are 550 "issues", not "problems". How does this illuminate the 650 vs LNL discussion??

I personally know two 550 users that hand prime every case because the on-press-primer is too hard to keep running right. It is continually gunked up with spent primer residue.
Yes, when you only have 4 stations the de-capping and new priming is done at the same station. It helps if you actually work a tooth brush in that area every 1000 rounds or so. Maybe even wipe a cleaning cloth in there.

Then there are the Dillon users who complain about the spring-ball-detent being too stiff and spilling powder from charged cases....
They probably have their shell holder screw too tight which causes them to push too hard. It's a variable adjustment that admittedly calls for some OJT.

the spent primer catcher missing spent primers,
Part of complaint #1. Not new.

...not to mention the squibs and double charges enabled by a manually indexed press with no station for a powder check die.
Yes you have to LOOK at what you're doing, just like any other press. If you think you can add a Powder Cop and not look, then you are deceiving yourself.

If you really want to believe that only non-Dillon progressives have problems, you probably can; just close your eyes.
No, I happen to believe that there is NO one single perfect reloading machine. Like all machines, they all have issues which can only be minimized by operating them within the design limits. Gauging by the videos on YouTube it's fair to say every brand has it's share of ne'er-do-wells.

;)

BigJakeJ1s
December 27, 2010, 09:17 PM
rfwobbly,

What part of my post is dis-information? Dillon, Hornady and other progressive presses all have their problems. I was responding to earlier posts that mentioned only problems with the Hornady progressive, by providing information about problems that exist with Dillon presses too. Seems a lot of people who are willing to jump all over a non-Dillon presses' problems are a bit blind to the problems existing on Dillon presses (likely because, like most Hornady users, they have learned to solve or work around the problems to their satisfaction.) However, unlike some previous posts, I did not neglect to mention that all progressive presses have their problems.

I was also responding to earlier posts promoting Dillon's support of their older equipment, by pointing out the limits of that support. The old-style PM support issue is relevant to all of their presses.

I noticed you did not chide earlier posts about Dillon's support (or Hornady's lack of support) of older presses as being off-topic. If Dillon's support of a 450 or 550 press is relevant to the discussion of merit between a 650 and an LNL AP, are not the limitations of same also relevant?

With regard to the spring ball-detent issue, and tightening the shell plate too much or not enough, apparently this is a problem for more than a few users, since it is a well-published modification (apparently except by Dillon), as is adding a roller thrust bearing under the shell plate bolt head. The root of the problem is that the 650 indexes in one step on the down-stroke of the ram, which results in an abrupt shell-plate movement, and often in powder spilled from cases. The Hornady LNL AP solves this problem by splitting the shell plate advancement into two smaller, smoother half-steps, one on the up-stroke, and one on the down stroke.

If you use an RCBS lock-out or Dillon audible powder-check die, you do not have to look at every case's powder charge. I believe we all know that these machines are not meant to be run blindly, but reducing the number of things that have to be constantly monitored is a good thing.

Andy

oneounceload
December 27, 2010, 09:44 PM
Haven't met ANY progressive - either metallic or shotshell - that did NOT have issues, especially with the primer feed area. Had a 550 - it ran OK for small pistol, but not for rifle. Personally, I like RCBS - good quality, lifetime free parts, even if you bought it used.........

JMO

jeepmor
December 27, 2010, 10:41 PM
As a Hornady LNL EZject owner, I like it. Takes some getting used to, but change over is a snap, and big time saver in my experience. No comment on Dillon as I've never used or owned one.

I did take a chamfer bit to my priming devices by hand to ease the edges. Reliability got better on that end. All devices seem to require some sort of setup tuning. As a purely mechanical system, this is normal..

GW Staar
December 28, 2010, 11:53 PM
Haven't met ANY progressive - either metallic or shotshell - that did NOT have issues, especially with the primer feed area. Had a 550 - it ran OK for small pistol, but not for rifle. Personally, I like RCBS - good quality, lifetime free parts, even if you bought it used.........

JMO

Me too! About time somebody added another color to this bichromatic thread!:D Blues and Reds are not the only quality progressive presses out there, no matter how hard some people try to make people believe. A person who wants variety reloading (more than a few calibers or just two for that matter) would be wise to investigate the RCBS Pro 2000 as a choice. Strong, simple, and fast.

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