How much should a gunsmith charge to put a K-frame back together?


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John Wayne
December 17, 2010, 04:45 PM
I bought a S&W 13-1, and disassembled the gun to have a look at the internals. I took everything out--hammer, hammer block, trigger, hand, the whole 9 yards. I didn't take the actual hammer assembly or anything else down into its respective components beyond that though. Decided I didn't want to fool with putting it back together (esp. the rebound spring), so I took it to a gunsmith, whom I've never used before.

My instructions were: clean and lubricate parts, install Wolff 13# rebound spring (which I included), and reassemble. I just got a call saying the gun is ready.

The price? $43.50. His hourly rate is $45.

Keep in mind that the gun was already disassembled, and that he used a spring supplied by me.

Is this a reasonable rate? Should it take a competent gunsmith nearly an hour to reassemble a very common gun that was already disassembled to begin with?

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GP100man
December 17, 2010, 05:03 PM
Reasonable in my area !

I charge extra to reassemble components (automotive) when they come in a shoe box !

What does he charge for cleanin the K-frame .

Not to say to be unfair to customers ,it`s just that most of the time it`s taken way down past the point it needed to be to be repaired in the first place !!

Salty1
December 17, 2010, 05:09 PM
Personally I would not complain about that price, I do not feel that it is inexpensive yet in the same breath do not feel like he took advantage of you either.... by the time he sits down with your gun, gets the toold he needs, assembles, tests it and cleans it up I can easily see an hours worth of time invested in it...

PT1911
December 17, 2010, 05:12 PM
Most every profession that I am aware of that charges consumers an hourly rate charges for a minimum of 1 hour... Plumbers, electricians, mechanics, and gunsmiths... It probably only took him 15 minutes to reassemble your gun correctly (including cleaning.)

His price seems very reasonable and a heck of a lot better than a useless bag of parts.

GCBurner
December 17, 2010, 05:15 PM
You got off cheap.

Jim Watson
December 17, 2010, 05:17 PM
I do not think it out of line. He probably didn't spend an hour putting it back together but he had to deal with you coming and going and if it stayed 24 hours he had to log it in and out.

Of course you could have gotten a manual and a rebound spring tool for less money than that.

rcmodel
December 17, 2010, 05:18 PM
I would have charged you more then that.

Since he started out with the parts in a bag, and not a working gun, he had to safety & function check every part to make sure you hadn't already screwed with it using a bastard file.

$45 bucks is reasonable to take a working K-Frame apart, clean it, and put it back together.

But not one that comes in the front door in a sack.

rc

mickeyblueyes
December 17, 2010, 05:20 PM
I asked a local gunsmith two receive 2 shotguns I bought at auction. He charged me $40 each thats $80. to do a 2 min back ground check ,of which he could have put 4 guns on.
Then he had a screaming fit when I asked him to remove the spacer plug and the spring popped out. Literally screaming raving mad. My friend and I just looked at each other I apologized for causing a problem and left. What you do to others comes back to you sooner or latter.

billybob44
December 17, 2010, 06:15 PM
Reasonable in my area !

I charge extra to reassemble components (automotive) when they come in a shoe box !

What does he charge for cleanin the K-frame .
^^^+1 I'm a retired GM Master Tech-When a customer used to bring in a Quadra-Jet carb dis-assembled in a box=YES=they did pay more than if they had drove the car in complete with carb. You gotta know that "Basket Case" jobs are always cost more..Bill.

NMPOPS
December 17, 2010, 06:48 PM
Ya got off cheap. Most places that charge by the hour will charges at least a minimum of one hour.

Onmilo
December 17, 2010, 06:49 PM
He charged you less than his one hour rate.
He must like you because most of us charge a minimum of one hour and that is just to look at the mess, never mind putting it back together as that is gonna cost more:D

oldbanjo
December 17, 2010, 07:05 PM
If I take it apart I can put it back together, my brother used to bring me things that he had took apart for me to reassemble. Some things I couldn't put back together. If your Gun was together when the Gunsmith looked at it, he would know a lot about it before he disassembled it. A bag full of parts may not have been in working order when you took it apart. And People will LIE.

Jim K
December 17, 2010, 07:14 PM
"Decided I didn't want to fool with it..." Translation: I didn't have any idea how to put the thing back together.

Jim

GRIZ22
December 17, 2010, 08:02 PM
It was a fair price.

This is a perfect example of the useless practice of detail stripping on a regular basis.

Black Knight
December 17, 2010, 08:20 PM
Sounds about right. Back in 2004 at an Armorers course I ran into a guy that charged $50 an hour with a 2 hour minimum. You were looking at a $100 bill from the get go with parts being extra.

CajunBass
December 17, 2010, 08:28 PM
"Back in the day" my boat mechanic had a sign in his shop that said,

Hourly rate: $10.00 per hour. $15.00 if you watch. $20.00 if you already worked on it.

I'd say it was fair.

Old Fuff
December 17, 2010, 09:48 PM
John Wayne didn't specify if the cylinder sub-assembly was disassembled or not, or if the job included cleaning as well as lubrication and reassembly. Without knowing I will presume that the 'smith has invested in the correct screwdrivers, rebound slide spring tool, and other things needed to do a professional quality job. Given the provided information, I can't say if the charge was too high or not, but no matter what it is, it's a good idea to get a quote before leaving any work. I will say that over the years I have noticed that some folks believe that fix'n guns is so much fun that the 'smith should pay them, since the gun owner gave them the opportunity. :banghead:

At least Mr. Wayne was honest - usually the bagged gun comes with a story about how someone else took it apart. :uhoh:

Oyeboten
December 17, 2010, 10:18 PM
Sounds like a fair price to me.

CraigC
December 17, 2010, 10:38 PM
You got in over your head and he bailed you out for cheap, don't cry about it now.

Marshall
December 17, 2010, 10:57 PM
I say a fair price.

I would be pleased at that price to have the gun in working order and know it was done properly. Be happy and enjoy your revolver.

357 Terms
December 17, 2010, 11:07 PM
Feel fortunate that he wasn't a lawyer.

John Wayne
December 17, 2010, 11:31 PM
Decided I didn't want to fool with it..." Translation: I didn't have any idea how to put the thing back together.

No, translation: I don't want to order a rebound spring insertion tool that I will only use once and wait a week for it to get here.

You got in over your head and he bailed you out for cheap, don't cry about it now. Actually, no. I have taken apart S&W revolvers before, the only difference being that I left the rebound spring in place because of its reputation as being difficult to install. I'm not "crying'' about the price, I want to know if this is fair or not. I have never used a gunsmith before because most around here don't know what they're doing and charge an outrageous sum. Does it make you feel better to ridicule people who ask opinions on hourly work?

John Wayne didn't specify if the cylinder sub-assembly was disassembled or not, or if the job included cleaning as well as lubrication and reassembly. No sub-assemblies were disassembled.

This is a perfect example of the useless practice of detail stripping on a regular basis.
This was a used gun that I'd removed rust off of using steel wool. There were steel wool shavings in the action from where I'd removed rust off the hammer. Given that there was rust on the hammer, I wanted to make sure the internals didn't look like <deleted> too.



I didn't pry the side plate off with a screwdriver, attempt to stone the sear with a dremel, remove the hammer block, strip out the sideplate screws, or disassemble anything that didn't need to be disassembled. I simply removed parts (actually one part) that I didn't have the tools to reassemble, and wondered whether this was a reasonable rate for someone to put it back together.

Thank you to all who commented on whether this was a reasonable rate or not.

To everyone who felt the need to relegate me to some kitchen table gunsmith or make unwarranted assumptions about my competence, I'd venture to guess your insecurity stems from experience.

mljdeckard
December 18, 2010, 01:37 AM
I have had gunsmiths take mercy on me before and break it down to 1/4 or 1/2 hour for something that only took them a few minutes. Maybe your guy has worked on hundreds of them and it was easy for him.

And yes, whether it's a car, a gun, a dryer, a guitar amp, or anything else I need fixed, just because the person is an expert in their field doesn't mean they have an easy time assembling something when they didn't see how it came apart in the first place. I think it's perfectly reasonable to charge extra or refuse the job completely.

RevolvingGarbage
December 18, 2010, 04:34 AM
I can't fathom taking something apart and not being able to put it back together. Not since the age of about 12 anyway.

Go buy a cheap air-pistol or airsoft gun and take it apart and look at it till you figure it out, you will be better for the experience.

evan price
December 18, 2010, 04:48 AM
I've never needed anything more than a decent pair of flat-blade screwdrivers to disassemble and reassemble a S&W K-frame. The rebound assembly goes in with the spring already in the block, set it to the trigger side first with the spring resting on the retainer pin (Notice there's slots cut in the rebound block that fit the pin perfectly), make sure the trigger strut is in the hole, then put your thumb on top of the rebound block, compress the spring inwards with a flat screwdriver and when the end of the spring clears the pin, push the block down, remove the screwdriver. Ta-da.

Sure, a rebound spring tool would be nice but it's not required. Only concern is making sure you don't slip and then the rebound spring shoots across the room, knocks over your wife's Hummel figurine and disappears behind the bookcase. AMHIK!

KosmicKrunch
December 18, 2010, 05:01 AM
Heck, if you lived near me, I would do that for a cup of really good coffee and a decent coffee table/work bench conversation. Would take about 15 min to 1/2 hour for the whole shabang if done right.

Nasty
December 18, 2010, 09:47 AM
Lol...

"Took it to a gunsmith and he charged me $25.25"

"What? you turned one screw and for that you charged $25.25?"

"No,,,Turning the screw was $.25"


"The other $25 was for knowing which one to turn."

Old Shooter
December 18, 2010, 10:13 AM
You took it to a professional gunsmith and he re-assembled your basket-case revolver for less than an hours rate. Sounds like SOP in most repair shops I've seen.

I'd call that fair. If it was a kitchen table smith mayby it would have been a few bucks cheaper but then you usually get what you pay for.

I wouldn't complain about the charge but mayby next time I'd try to put it together myself. ( I've taken those Smiths all the way down and with patience they go back together with minimal heartburn)

Xfire68
December 18, 2010, 10:42 AM
John Wayne wrote:To everyone who felt the need to relegate me to some kitchen table gunsmith or make unwarranted assumptions about my competence, I'd venture to guess your insecurity stems from experience.

I to find it pretty darn funny how many people are quick to make assumptions about you and say things they would never have the nuggets to say to you face to face but, yet on the internet they somehow find it perfectly "normal" behavior?

As to your question yes that was fair as has been stated most charge a minimum of 1 hour to make the job worth their time.

X-Rap
December 18, 2010, 10:48 AM
Conversely I think its pretty funny that a guy would take apart a gun and take it to someone else to reassemble then question/complain about how much it cost to thousands of other shooters over the internet but probably would only confide the above to only his closest friends in person.

John Wayne
December 18, 2010, 05:23 PM
Heck, if you lived near me, I would do that for a cup of really good coffee and a decent coffee table/work bench conversation. Would take about 15 min to 1/2 hour for the whole shabang if done right.

No idea where you live, but check out www.littleriverroasting.com if you haven't heard about them. All of their coffee is roasted in-house.

Conversely I think its pretty funny that a guy would take apart a gun and take it to someone else to reassemble then question/complain about how much it cost to thousands of other shooters over the internet but probably would only confide the above to only his closest friends in person.
No, I don't have a problem telling my friends about having someone else reassemble my revolver. I didn't try to hide it from the people in the gun store (that I know well) either.

Lost Sheep
December 18, 2010, 06:31 PM
John Wayne,

You showed a lot of class, not flaming your detractors back. For that, you have my admiration. I suspect that some of them had not read your original post all the way through (or paid "selective attention" to it, ignoring parts that did not reinforce their prejudices).

I noticed that no one defending the gunsmith (except rcmodel) mentioned that he, in reassembling a gun he had not disassembled, takes on an increase risk of liability for it's functioning when reassembled. He had no opportunity to function check anything. He was lucky you brought him a gun with which he was undoubtedly intimately familiar. If it were a less common gun he might still be trying to figure out where this extra part is supposed to go.

My off-the-cuff opinion on the breakdown of charges:
$10.00 Walking in the door charge (covers making the receipt and the accounting)
$0.00 Disassembly: $10.00 (discount for it already being done, $10.00)
$10.00 Counting the disassembled parts:
$0.00 Cleaning: $10.00 (discount for it already being done, $10.00)
$10.00 Lube and service:
$10.00 Assembly
$10.00 Function Check $0.00 (included with assembly) (Surcharge for checking a gun not previously checked when fully assembled $10.00.)

$50.00

Anything under $50 seems fair to me.

Attitude when you came in the door might make a big difference, as well as the care with which you laid out the parts in the box.

Charging 10% of a gun's value to reassemble it may seem to some to be excessive. I don't.

But then, there is a reason I don't own any S&W revolvers. I had a K-22 Masterpiece once. Lovely shooter and good-looking gun. I took it apart. (as far as I dared). I did a little cleaning and oiling, put back the parts that sprang out when I took the side plate off and never opened it again. It had at least twice the number of parts that my Dan Wessons had. And I could look at the innards of my Wessons and knew what each part did. Not so with the Smith & Wesson. So, today, all but two of my revolvers are Dan Wessons or Rugers. I have a Colt and a Taurus as well.

I (try to) adhere to the adage, "If I can't strip, service and reassemble it, I don't deserve to own it." I don't comply with the adage 100%, so my car goes to a mechanic and the electronics of my boiler/furnace get professional service.

My washing machine and dryer, bicycle, computers, guitars, film cameras and guns are serviced by me. 90% of the time. I make no pretense of perfection. And when I am over my head, I recognize it and seek the skills of professional.

If I found myself in your situation, I would do exactly as you did. And when I ask for advice on if I screwed myself or not, I would not expect to be insulted online. Anyone who would behave so badly must be:

1) horribly insecure
2) aspiring to comedy of the type of Conan O'Brian's dog, Triumph, Bart Simpson, Don Rickles, Lisa Lampanelli, Andrew Dice Clay or Yucko the Clown.
3) just plain mean or
4) really bad at expressing themselves in writing. (Please don't make any cracks about my inability to edit myself.)

Congratulations on "dodging a bullet". (my attempt at humor)

Lost Sheep

SlamFire1
December 18, 2010, 06:59 PM
Had a plumber come over this week, $107 per hour.

Car mechanics are about $50.00 an hour.

You could have saved the $43.00 by putting the revolver back together yourself.

Don't disassemble a firearm over shag carpet. You will never find the spring, detent ball, or tiny screw once it falls off the table.

Word. ;)

LeonCarr
December 18, 2010, 07:25 PM
My local gunsmith charges a shop rate of 62 bucks an hour. If everything works as advertised when you got it back, you got a deal.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Lost Sheep
December 18, 2010, 07:31 PM
:neener:

Set up a backpack tent in your living room.

Strip naked. (lest small parts wind up in folds in your clothes).:eek:

Take the gun and all tools into the tent.

Zip the tent door closed.

You can now disassemble the gun without (much) fear of losing parts.

This way, any parts that get lost, you know they cannot have gone far. And at least you will have them all in a (large) bag if you take it to the gunsmith.

Don't even THINK about how to explain to your wife being naked with a gun and tools in a tent in your living room.:what:

:)

Lost Sheep

KosmicKrunch
December 18, 2010, 08:05 PM
That site for the coffee looks cool. I really would do the job for a cup of coffee as a pay it forward. I had bought a Ruger Red Label .20ga in pieces at a gun show. I checked against a parts list and drawing I was able to scrounge up from a friends computer at the show to make sure it was all there. I took it to a gun smith friend and asked for help with a Caribou Coffee and a Cheese Danish in hand and he reassembled it and allowed me to go out back and shoot some clay birds. He told me whenever I can, Pay it Forward. I got the pieces parts for $175 + Coffee + Cheese Danish. So, now when gun type folks need a favor, I do it for a good coffee.

Note to self: keep a box of rebound springs & sideplate screws on hand and make a simple installation tool from an old cleaning rod section by making two 90 degree bends and slot the end with a dremel tool, add a Gorillia Tape handle..... OK, bring on the S&W take downs * Rubs hands with anticipation.

John Wayne: Just for the fact you had the Gonza's to take that in and admit your woes, I offer you for free a set of Sile Hardwood Thumbrest Grips w/screw, NIB for a "K" frame Smith. Just PM me with your address and I will get them out in a flat rate priority box. All I ask is that you somehow pay it forward to someone here at THR. Then request they pay it forward and so on. Deal or No Deal................?

John Wayne
December 18, 2010, 08:48 PM
Lost Sheep, thanks for that breakdown. It makes more sense that way. FWIW, I didn't have a bad attitude when I took it to the gunsmith.

Part of the reason I was shocked at the price was because I'd originally asked how long he thought it would take, since it wasn't very dirty and it was already disassembled. He was honest and said that it could take less than 30 minutes, or up to an hour. Being that he installs match-grade rifle barrels and does a lot of machine work (which ought to be a prerequisite to being a gunsmith in the first place), I really thought he could do it in uder 30. I mean, there are videos of people on youtube doing it in less time, and it probably would have taken me an hour (albeit with much frustration) to learn to do it myself.

I am also of the opinion that you shouldn't own anything you can't service yourself. I am in the process of familiarizing myself with S&W revolvers, having removed an internal lock and removed internal parts for cleaning on an old model 10. In fact, the only thing I haven't removed before is the rebound spring, because of the repuation it has.

I got a good laugh out of the sitting naked in a tent thing, it sounds like a sure-fire way for DIY projects from now on.

KosmicKrunch, you're too kind. I sent you a PM, and would love to send you some coffee for those grips.

KingMedicine
December 18, 2010, 08:58 PM
i wish my gunsmith only charged 45 an hour... everyone around here seems to ask around 65....

oneounceload
December 18, 2010, 09:09 PM
He should have charged you 4X that price to keep you out of the insides.........

Is this another price gouging question?.....were you a willing participant? Then no matter what you paid, it was a fair price, and I hope he charged as much as he could

CraigC
December 18, 2010, 09:16 PM
I apologize for making assumptions, I reckon I just read a little too much into the original post and jumped on the bandwagon.

SeanSw
December 18, 2010, 09:43 PM
Fair price IMO. I did my own work to change around some springs and polish the bur on a MIM hammer. I paid about $25 for the S&W revolver shop manual and didn't find assembly to be too complex. Making sure that everything fit together at the proper angles and functioned perfectly was another issue entirely. I didn't alter any of that and expected to pay handsomely if someone else had to correct my mistakes.

Try a Ruger next time :)

Magnumite
December 18, 2010, 11:54 PM
I think $45 was fine. You paid for his expertise, equipment and experience. Nowadays, $50 for professional service isn't bad at all. And as mentioned before, when recieving a "basket case" job, it always takes more. I am an auto tech and anytime I recieve a basket case I count on at least double the time to ensure integrity in each component or system. SAme as when I recieve a number of firearms components to fit. Same thing.

Waywatcher
December 18, 2010, 11:57 PM
Another vote for $45 being reasonable, maybe even a deal.

Hondo 60
December 19, 2010, 12:32 AM
Yup, $45 is OK in my book.

evan price & Lost Sheep - thanks for the laughs. :D

I too am disappointed in the less than mature responses by some.
Have you NEVER been in this situation?

If you can HONESTLY answer no, then congrats on leading a charmed life or else you've never ventured there.

788Ham
December 19, 2010, 12:33 AM
Not to steal the thread here: Some time back, I bought a .32 auto, it had needed some TLC for quite a while. I bought new Wolff springs, took it to the smithy and ask him if he had time to install them. Springs installed, everything checked to make it function properly, total billed was $47.50 OTD Now, he had the expertise, the right tools, I didn't, I was at his mercy. It was worth it to me to pay and wait, my first experience with an older auto. Total time at smithy, 25 minutes, I'd have paid double if he'd have charged it.

X-Rap
December 19, 2010, 12:58 AM
Have you NEVER been in this situation?


Yes, way back before Al Gore invented the Internet I dropped my old 10/22 in the river and filled it with sand. When I got home I went to strip it for cleaning and got some parts mixed up and couldn't figure how to put it together. As luck would have it my dad was wanting one for himself so he went down to KMart and bought a new one for $79.00 and I used the diagram in the box to assemble mine. Today I can't understand what was stumping me as I can take one apart and reassemble with ease.
I was about 12 at the time and we both still have both rifles nearly 40 yrs later.
I remember taking apart my 1st K frame and with paper clips and small screw drivers I managed to get it back in running order, since those days I cant think of to many I haven't had apart if for no other reason than to see how they work.
I have acquired quite a few books over the yrs as well and they are very helpful.

CraigC
December 19, 2010, 09:54 AM
Came close with my AR-15 but no, I'm stubborn as a mule. I'll buy $200 worth of tools to only use once before I'd pay a gunsmith $50 to bail me out. While I've taken about everything I own completely apart, I've never had to take a basketcase to a gunsmith.....or a mechanic. At least not that I remember. ;)

Jim K
December 19, 2010, 10:05 PM
Maybe I am just as evil and prejudiced as the OP and others say I am, but I worked as a gunsmith and got pretty tired of people bringing me guns they took apart, lost parts, and then demanded I re-assemble for free and pay for the missing parts to boot. I don't mind helping with advice here or on other sites and wouldn't think of charging even if I could. But when someone calls a professional to do what he can't do, he needs to be willing to pay for the work.

Jim

EMC45
December 20, 2010, 10:42 AM
I tore down a Mod 38 Smith for my Pastor. It was so full of dirt and pocket lint the trigger wouldn't return under spring tension. I tore it down to the frame. Cleaned everything and oiled the appropriate places. It was the dirtiest and gummed up gun I had ever worked on. It took a while. I didn't charge him. I also threw in a Bianchi Speed Strip for free. The OP price was not a bad one though.

John Wayne
December 20, 2010, 03:34 PM
Got the gun back today. Took it to the range and fired 50 rounds through it, with no issues. Didn't really feel lighter or smoother at all, despite the rebound spring being 5# lighter. Also felt kind of gritty.

Took it home, removed the side plate and sure enough, dry as a bone. I mean, I didn't expect him to grease every contact point with tender loving care, but a 1/2 second spray of Rem Oil would have been better than NOTHING! Seems pretty unprofessional to me to reassemble a gun without any sort of lubrication.

I also got a mystery spring in my Wolff spring pack. I had not taken a rebound slide spring in with the gun, other than the Wolff one I wanted installed, but I got one back...so either he put a replacement stock spring in the gun, and never used the Wolff one (it is restapled), or he gave me a stock spring and put it in the Wolff bag.

Kind of confirms my suspicions that there's no such thing as a professional gunsmith any more, unless they only work for factories. Just because someone has a set of screwdrivers, a sight pusher, and a lathe does not mean they are qualified to work on guns.

billybob44
December 20, 2010, 03:45 PM
Had a plumber come over this week, $107 per hour.

Car mechanics are about $50.00 an hour.

You could have saved the $43.00 by putting the revolver back together yourself.

Don't disassemble a firearm over shag carpet. You will never find the spring, detent ball, or tiny screw once it falls off the table.

Word. ;)
Slam, as a retired GM Master Tech, I can tell that you have not been at a new car dealer service department for awhile. HA-$50.00 per hour? HA HA...Bill.

Magnumite
December 20, 2010, 06:13 PM
Auto tech (now instructor) here, too. I was going to input that, billybob, but didn't because it was a little off topic. Heck, at that rate I'd have them work on MY car for some things - just to see how it feels.

streakr
December 21, 2010, 09:27 AM
Pay him DOUBLE what he billed. A smith like that needs to be cultivated.

s

Deltaboy
December 21, 2010, 03:42 PM
You got off cheap keep him as your Smith for your next job.

oneounceload
December 21, 2010, 03:59 PM
You're actually lucky to have what appears to be, a decent smith close to you. Don't knock it, respect the knowledge, and learn from your mistakes

JohnBT
December 21, 2010, 06:22 PM
So, a farmer called the tractor mechanic in town to come out and look at his tractor. The guy said hello, started it, walked around it once, got a wrench and tightened a bolt. That fixed it. He said the price was $100.

The farmer couldn't believe it.

The mechanic replied, "That's $1 for tightening the bolt and $99 for knowing which one."

sw282
December 22, 2010, 02:17 AM
John ---You only learn by doing. l doubt your critics could have done better. As a kid l remember taking my dad's new Craftsman electric drill apart. He was not impressed. Luckily the Sears repairman saved the drill but l was unable to save my @$$ from Pop's belt:fire:

Norrick
December 22, 2010, 02:22 AM
most hourly rates do not get pro-rated for the first hour. One hour minimum.

oldfool
December 22, 2010, 08:10 AM
agree with those who say OP got off cheap
(try asking around what it costs to do an action job sometime)
you pay for knowledge, experience, and tools, not just sweat, not just time
and $45 ain't what it used to be, pay close attention next time you fill up your gas tank, or buy a kid a video game, or try to get an expired date but routine prescription refilled without the go-visit-doctor tax

hunto
December 22, 2010, 09:25 AM
You got off cheap.

Ya got off cheap.

Most every profession that I am aware of that charges consumers an hourly rate charges for a minimum of 1 hour...

x2 to these statements....

22-rimfire
December 22, 2010, 10:16 AM
I think it was a very fair price. A one-hour miniumum would be reasonable. Are you actually complaining about the price?

John Wayne
December 22, 2010, 11:45 AM
Did anyone on this entire page actually read my last post? The gun was reassembled without lubrication and possibly with some mystery spring inserted.

Pay him double? Seriously? I paid what he charged. If his work was worth more, he'd be charging more and people would be paying him more. I suppose you all are philanthropists who have enough money to routinely pay people double for their services, irrespective of whether or not they're to your satisfaction?

Does the "$99/$1 for knowing what to do/doing it" joke have to get mentioned in every thread relating to repairs?

CoRoMo
December 22, 2010, 12:12 PM
Many services, across a number of industries, are charged at a first hour minimum. If it takes five minutes, you get charged one hour. Only after the first hour, are you charged by the quarter hour or so.

KingMedicine
December 22, 2010, 09:31 PM
Some gunsmiths are good, some gunsmiths are not so good. This week i had to find someone to repair the timing of my S&W 66-3. Went to one shop that said it would take two hours at 68 bucks an hour. I walked.

Found another shop that gave me an estimate of 70 for that and a trigger job on a 29-3 with a weeks wait. They called today (a day later) to say everything was done for 78 bucks. I could not be more impressed with the service and quality of work.

Ask for an estimate before hand in writing, if you dont like where that is, then walk. I dont think his price was that unacceptable, but it does not sound like great service.

This thread prob needs to be shut down. I dont think its going to advance too much more in the discussion.

bdb benzino
December 23, 2010, 07:25 AM
Got the gun back today. Took it to the range and fired 50 rounds through it, with no issues. Didn't really feel lighter or smoother at all, despite the rebound spring being 5# lighter. Also felt kind of gritty.

Took it home, removed the side plate and sure enough, dry as a bone. I mean, I didn't expect him to grease every contact point with tender loving care, but a 1/2 second spray of Rem Oil would have been better than NOTHING! Seems pretty unprofessional to me to reassemble a gun without any sort of lubrication.

I also got a mystery spring in my Wolff spring pack. I had not taken a rebound slide spring in with the gun, other than the Wolff one I wanted installed, but I got one back...so either he put a replacement stock spring in the gun, and never used the Wolff one (it is restapled), or he gave me a stock spring and put it in the Wolff bag.

Kind of confirms my suspicions that there's no such thing as a professional gunsmith any more, unless they only work for factories. Just because someone has a set of screwdrivers, a sight pusher, and a lathe does not mean they are qualified to work on guns.

After this post its real obvious to me you were never going to be happy with his service. If you relayed this attitude to him about the price, thats probably why he did'nt oil the inards for you.
FWIW I watched a you tube video on "how to change a rebound spring", and although it was a pain, I had it done with a flat head screw driver in around 30 min. Its funny how now you are talking %$#@ about a guy that bailed you out of your own mistake! Some people!!

oldfool
December 23, 2010, 08:24 AM
did not mean to hurt anybody's feelings
but if you find a professional anything/something service person who will
A) do what you asked them to do
B) not do more than, not do less than what asked to do
C) do just that for a double sawbuck

post it.. they will get a LOT of new business !

22-rimfire
December 23, 2010, 12:21 PM
I routinely do more work for my clients as part of the service. I am not a gunsmith and I am willing to pay somebody for expertise that I lack whether it be because I don't feel like messing with it or I don't know how.

John Wayne, I don't know if anyone could have pleased you with that gun. You should have re-assembled it yourself if you know how. You got off cheap. If you want a pro, I suspect he would not do it for $40 or so unless it was a favor and you might have waited for 6 months for the one-hour work.

I understood that you asked him to re-assemble it, not lubricate and do other custom work.

The Lone Haranguer
December 23, 2010, 12:28 PM
I see nothing wrong with it. I can see taking nearly an hour to put it together and function test it. Even if it took less actual time, the labor rate comes from his knowing how to do it, which you obviously didn't.

Guillermo
December 23, 2010, 12:39 PM
sounds cheap to me

CSA 357
December 23, 2010, 06:17 PM
im thinking he saved you from messing up you gun, so yea you got off cheap!

orionengnr
December 23, 2010, 09:50 PM
If you wanted it lubed, there would be an additional $20 "HazMat" fee. :)

Since it's been so long since I've done it (and in honesty, have only done it once before) I just took apart my most recently purchased S&W revolver. It was dry as a bone, so it was worth the effort.

Took me about an hour to disassemble, inspect, clean, lube, reassemble and functional check. I guess I'm going to have to spend a few hours doing the same to my others. One every few nights and I'll be back in business.

Enjoy your S&W, and Merry Christmas. :)

KevininPa
December 24, 2010, 06:18 PM
My 'smith charges 50 an hour and I never argue. He does excellent work with cleaning and test firing with adjustments.

John Wayne
December 24, 2010, 08:01 PM
After this post its real obvious to me you were never going to be happy with his service.

Since you're so adept at making assumptions about things that are "real obvious," would you care to predict my future as well?


If you relayed this attitude to him about the price, thats probably why he did'nt oil the inards for you.

NOT ONCE did I say that I went to him with a bad attitude, nor did I. If I got upset about anything it was the kind of responses in this thread, and if I vented anywhere, it was here and not to the person who I'd entrusted with my gun. It says a lot about your character that you justify deliberately sacrificing the quality of the work based on the attitude of an individual, while still charging them the same price.

FWIW I watched a you tube video on "how to change a rebound spring", and although it was a pain, I had it done with a flat head screw driver in around 30 min. Its funny how now you are talking %$#@ about a guy that bailed you out of your own mistake! Some people!!


How exactly am I "talking %$#@" about someone? I am dissatisfied with the services of someone who didn't do what I'd asked and paid for, which was to lube and reassemble a revolver.

You know what I find funny (or at least ironic)? That you are criticizing me for not being satisfied with the workmanship of someone whom you do not know, about a gun you have not seen, and still think I am being irrational. You also posted in this thread to criticize me, yet accuse me of speaking poorly of other people.

I started this thread asking a simple question, which has been answered. I paid the man what he asked, didn't criticize him, and have my gun back. I am also dissatisfied but will break a gun putting it back together myself next time before I take it anywhere, and won't bother asking anyone on THR about it either. There is no need to continue jumping on the "you got off easy" bandwagon.

Old Fuff
December 24, 2010, 08:35 PM
I suspect you may be more capable in disassembling and reassembling your revolver then you think. I suggest that you go to www.brownells.com and buy a book: The S&W Revolver - A shop Manual, by Jerry Kuhnhausen. Brownells will also sell you any tools you may need. If you'd like to know more about the current models with MIM lockwork, go to this forum's Handguns: Revolvers sub-forum and you will find an illustrated guide at the top. As everything on THR, it's free.

Thereafter you shouldn't be dependent on anyone. ;)

Jim K
December 24, 2010, 08:45 PM
I hate to get into this thread again, but lubing a revolver doesn't require taking off a sideplate or removing parts. Here's how: 1) Cock the hammer and put 4-5 drops of a good gun oil down in front of the hammer. 2) Put 2-3 drops in front of the trigger. 3) Swing out the cylinder and put 1-2 drops on the ratchet, 2 drops at the bottom of the crane where it fits into the frame, 2 drops on the outside of the extractor rod, and 1 drop on the extractor behind the ratchet. 4) On an S&W, put one drop into the front end of the extractor rod and one into the barrel lug.

No screwdrivers, no missing parts, no gunsmith.

Jim

Old Fuff
December 24, 2010, 08:53 PM
I agree, but it takes away all of the fun... :D

22-rimfire
December 24, 2010, 09:03 PM
Merry Christmas, John Wayne!

KingMedicine
December 24, 2010, 09:12 PM
Seriously.. this thread needs a tiny lock on it. The Horse has been beaten to death.

Ala Dan
December 24, 2010, 09:33 PM
Very good price for 'smitty work~! Consider yourself VERY lucky~! ;) :D

KodiakBeer
December 24, 2010, 10:57 PM
The last time I had a smith reassemble a revolver for me, he only charged me ten bucks. Plus, he threw in an action trigger job, a detail cleaning and polishing, 4 boxes of match ammo, an autographed picture of Ed McGivern and offered to let me sleep with his nubile 19 year old sister.

I thought that was fair.

Guillermo
December 24, 2010, 11:49 PM
I had a revolver that needed assembly and it cost me three thousand, two hundred and twenty seven dollars and seventeen cents.

it was too much but I didn't want him to take a hacksaw to my gun.

THAT DAMNED OLD FUFF!!!!

He is a jihadist kidnapper!!!


:cuss:

earplug
December 25, 2010, 12:11 AM
I could read countless articles on polishing up a perfectly fine S&W revolvers action.
I used to do the work while bored in motel rooms while traveling.
There are now numerous means of finding out how to take apart a S&W revolver and put them back together.
Being stupid still costs. About $50.00 seems to be the going rate.

Lost Sheep
December 25, 2010, 12:30 AM
After this post its real obvious to me you were never going to be happy with his service. If you relayed this attitude to him about the price, thats probably why he didn't oil the inards for you.


In my opinion any gunsmith who would deliberately (if it was) fail to oil a reassembled gun (regardless of the customer's attitude) should be run out of business, or prosecuted for negligence (perhaps negligent homicide if it should come to that.)

Refuse the job, OK. Virtually sabotage a man's gun? Never.

Its funny how now you are talking %$#@ about a guy that bailed you out of your own mistake! Some people!!

The OP did not originally denigrate the gunsmith, his pricing or his work's quality. The OP simply asked if the price seemed reasonable. A valid question, to which the answer has been clearly "No" and accepted by the OP. That case is closed.

Mentioning the lack of lubrication is a valid complaint but did not come until later. However, "talking %$#", it is not.

As far as inferring a "bad attitude" on the part of the OP, methinks such conclusions have been jumped to overmuch.

But then, I may give the benefit of doubt too much. But then, I try to extend that courtesy to all posts I respond to.

Lost Sheep

Lost Sheep
December 25, 2010, 12:39 AM
The last time I had a smith reassemble a revolver for me, he only charged me ten bucks. Plus, he threw in an action trigger job, a detail cleaning and polishing, 4 boxes of match ammo, an autographed picture of Ed McGivern and offered to let me sleep with his nubile 19 year old sister.

I thought that was fair.
__________________
Potentially, a government is the most dangerous threat to man's rights: it holds a legal monopoly on the use of physical force against legally disarmed victims.
Ayn Rand
$10 to have a 'smith do anything? The last time I saw prices like that, Ed hadn't yet been born yet .

And when was the word "nubile" last in vogue?

Good to read your posts again, Kodiakbeer. I've been away.

Lost Sheep

logical
December 25, 2010, 01:20 AM
The real question is did you ask what he was going to charge when you dropped it off?
Regardless, seems reasonable for an hourly rate. I'd have charged you more and probably would have had a few parts left over.

9mmepiphany
December 25, 2010, 02:33 AM
I do think this thread has run it's course.

I thought it would die a natural death...two pages ago...but I guess it needs a little help

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