Shood I shoot this S&W? It's a moral question.


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t_dickinson
December 17, 2010, 06:13 PM
I recently bought my first blue revolver for what I'm told was a great deal. It's a 15-3 made in 1975 with original box, papers, cleaning kit, and screwdriver.

It's beautiful and has not a blemish save a VERY faint turn ring.

Is this a collector-grade piece that a serious collector should have? I planned to shoot it but it just looks too nice.

Does buying a time capsule like this and then shooting the hell out of it take away from the limited supply of collector pieces? SHould I just buy a "shooter" and keep this preserved? I'm feeling guilty. I know it's not a one of a kind gun but what should I do? BTW, it would be for bullseye only and NEVER see a holster.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=132363&d=1292627572

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PabloJ
December 17, 2010, 06:24 PM
I avoid older boxed stuff when possible. This does two things save money at purchase time and I don't have to feel guilt associated with using given piece. Model 15 is very common S&W model with many thousands made . It will become very valuable when S&W goes out of business completely or stops making "wheel guns". If this happens all complaints (lock, barrel jacket, lack of barrel locking pin,......) associated with S&W revolvers will go away instantly. You have to decide what to do with your gun.

gorenut
December 17, 2010, 06:30 PM
I'd shoot it. Then again, I'm not a collector. Every gun I purchase, I purchase with the intention of shooting it, and shooting if often.

highorder
December 17, 2010, 06:32 PM
I'd shoot it, but only with light loads, and not thousands of them.

There are too many Model 10's out there for that.

Monster Zero
December 17, 2010, 06:34 PM
Either use is honorable. Your decision.

Rexster
December 17, 2010, 06:40 PM
Shoot it. Carry it! It is not a museum piece.

roaddog28
December 17, 2010, 06:45 PM
Shoot it. A classic S&W revolver but not a collector. There were plenty made. The pre-15 combat masterpiece are harder to find but still not worth anymore than $300. I bought one for $299.
Howard

earplug
December 17, 2010, 06:45 PM
Sell it at a profit and replace it with a shooter grade without a box and paper work.
Use the profits for a action job, holster and more ammo.

bigtubby
December 17, 2010, 06:46 PM
It is a very nice gun but not really a collector piece yet! If it were mine I would not shoot it. buy a shooter and you won't have to worry about it.

t_dickinson
December 17, 2010, 07:47 PM
Shoot it. A classic S&W revolver but not a collector. There were plenty made. The pre-15 combat masterpiece are harder to find but still not worth anymore than $300. I bought one for $299.
Howard

Ok, you did better than I did. I looked for a long time and never found a piece in this condition for close to $300. How do you guys do it? Everytime I find a good price on a good gun, someone tells me they blew that price out of the water.

I'll show my cards here - $400 did I make a bad investment?

aHFo3
December 17, 2010, 07:59 PM
You did just fine at $400. I use gunbroker.com as a fairly decent price guide. If you sign-up with them you can search past auctions and see what they've actually sold for.
Roaddog found a great deal if it's a pre-15. It makes me want to ask what year he made that purchase and what kind of condition?

Let's see some pics!

CajunBass
December 17, 2010, 08:08 PM
Ok, you did better than I did. I looked for a long time and never found a piece in this condition for close to $300. How do you guys do it? Everytime I find a good price on a good gun, someone tells me they blew that price out of the water.

Those guns are always in the far away land of "Somewhere Else." I never seem to find them either. :D So I stopped worrying about it. So what I pay a few bucks more for something I want. I'm not trying to make a profit on it.

Shoot it or not? Well, I sort of understand you dilemna. I recently bought a Model 10, that while not perfect is pretty close, in the box with all the papers. I MAY not shoot it, BUT only because I have other guns to shoot. If I didn't, I'd shoot the snot out of it.

CSA 357
December 17, 2010, 08:12 PM
i would shoot the snott out of it! i never buy guns to put in the safe to stay, ok now get busy!

PabloJ
December 17, 2010, 08:21 PM
Ok, you did better than I did. I looked for a long time and never found a piece in this condition for close to $300. How do you guys do it? Everytime I find a good price on a good gun, someone tells me they blew that price out of the water.

I'll show my cards here - $400 did I make a bad investment?
I see about $500 worth there.

t_dickinson
December 17, 2010, 08:21 PM
shoot the snott out of it! i never buy guns to put in the safe to stay, ok now get busy!

Yeah!! Grunt, growl, beat on chest. You guys are getting me all fired up. Don't shame a gun by putting a muzzle on the muzzle (very clever there, eh?)!

I'm gonna shoot the f-ing snot out of it!!! But...

Old Fuff
December 17, 2010, 10:04 PM
While model 15's are very common, ones like new in the box are not. As a consequence so-called "collectable grade" examples are bringing as much as $600 at some auctions, and I would expect it to go up. This may jolt some, but as a rule of thumb collectors are often willing to pay more then shooters to obtain a piece - if it is exactly what they want, usually meaning unfired.

I am aware of many members who advise others to shoot like-new guns that have a collector's value (real or potential) but these advisers have nothing to lose. The gun owner does.

This is not a moral question - it's one of monetary value - or loss.

461
December 17, 2010, 10:24 PM
I recently went through the same dilemma. I bought an unfired handgun that I knew I could turn for a immediate profit of a couple hundred dollars, but I had always wanted one for myself.

I shot it, loved it and now have found a keeper for me. If I hadn't shot it, I'd have had a few hundred bucks but I'd not have the joy of a great shooter.

357 Terms
December 17, 2010, 10:35 PM
In 5 years you will make a profit if you decide to sell it. Regardless shoot it enjoy!

BCCL
December 17, 2010, 10:48 PM
It's beautiful and has not a blemish save a VERY faint turn ring.

There's your answer right there, the bloom is off the rose already, shoot it and enjoy.

John Wayne
December 17, 2010, 11:41 PM
You could buy a beater K frame from J&G for $200, shoot that one, and keep the one you have in a safe.

In 5 years, the safe queen may have appreciated in value enough to justify purchasing a beater gun, and the beater gun will probably still be worth close to what you paid for it.

SundownRider
December 17, 2010, 11:52 PM
Why would you bring a pretty girl to the ball and not dance with her?:confused:

robctwo
December 18, 2010, 12:28 AM
I recently bought a nib 19-3 made in 1972. I shot 100 rounds through it today. Since purchase I've put a few thousand through it. I've put a Wolff spring kit in it and Ahrends retro-combat finger grove stocks on it. I'm not shooting a bunch of hot .357 through it, mostly tame .38 Specials.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/robctwo/DSCN0625.jpg

I figure I'll get my money out of it in fun. In twenty years I might sell it, or transfer it to the kids or grandkids.

Someone out there in 50-75 years might make an extra buck on an unfired gun he's kept stored somewhere because I shot the heck out of mine. I can't imagine that will be as much fun as the last 2,500 rounds I've shot, the tinkering with the gun, the cleaning and the reloading. And it won't happen for years.

I paid less for the brand new 1972 gun than I paid for the brand new 2009 25 Classic. I'm shooting the Classic a lot as well.

I bought the gun to avoid any possibility that I was buying something that had been abused.

ArchAngelCD
December 18, 2010, 02:06 AM
Like said above, the M15 is a Classic but not a collectors revolver.

Either shoot it or sell it because IMO no gun should be a safe-queen.
They were made to be shot and should be shot as often as possible...

For example, a few years back I came across a M36 that was either not shot or only a few rounds were fired through it. Well, that didn't last 24 hours because the next day I fired 200 rounds from that wonderful M36 and had a very good time doing it!!! :D

Nasty
December 18, 2010, 09:41 AM
Someone is going to enjoy it...might as well be you!

gordy
December 18, 2010, 10:35 AM
I voted shoot it.
Why did you buy it?
Shoot it or look at it?
It is your gun.

PS. I have a 81 yugo very few miles, is it a collector?

The Lone Haranguer
December 18, 2010, 10:47 AM
Is this a collector-grade piece that a serious collector should have?
It depends on how you define the terms, but I would say no. It is not old enough, and hundreds of thousands of them were made (if you count the total number). Moreover, it was meant to be a police service weapon knowing that it would be subjected to much use and even some abuse. There is absolutely nothing wrong with at least taking it out to shoot occasionally, or even "putting it to work," so to speak. (I think this option should have been added to your poll.)

preachnhunt
December 18, 2010, 10:55 AM
See sig line.

The Lone Haranguer
December 18, 2010, 11:07 AM
Realistically, if just used for occasional shooting or kept for home defense and stored properly, finish wear, other than exacerbating the cylinder "turn line," will not be an issue.

Onward Allusion
December 18, 2010, 11:07 AM
It's a common revolver. Shoot the heck out of it but keep it well maintained like you would any other gun.

RevDerb
December 18, 2010, 01:11 PM
If you can't shoot it is it really a gun? :banghead:

Deanimator
December 18, 2010, 01:23 PM
I won't buy anything I can't shoot.

Hondo 60
December 18, 2010, 01:37 PM
I'd shoot it. Then again, I'm not a collector. Every gun I purchase, I purchase with the intention of shooting it, and shooting if often.

+1 I don't believe in safe queens (at least not for me)

22-rimfire
December 18, 2010, 01:57 PM
If you don't need to shoot it, I'd park it in my safe. Model 15's are not uncommon and as one poster said, with the turn line, the "bloom is off the rose" regardless of what most non-collectors believe. The turn line automatically makes it a 98-99% gun.

The general rule of thumb is that collector guns should be 96% or better with the grade increasing relative to production or commonality of that particular model. For old guns, pre-1950, the % consideration generally lowers a bit. Take for example a Colt Bankers Special. They are ALL collector guns unless it is a rust bucket. So if you save the Model 15 for another 30-40 years, it probably has some collector value. It is your choice and for me depends on how many guns I own and my particular interests.

tasco 74
December 18, 2010, 02:10 PM
i got my dream gun a few years ago... a 1968 vintage s&w mod 27-2 6"very good condition in the box with the large s&w target grips......... i shoot it every chance i get............. so yes shoot shoot your handgun!!

joed
December 18, 2010, 02:23 PM
It's a nice gun but there are an awful lot of model 15's out there. Maybe some day it will be a collector but it is not at this point.

weisse52
December 18, 2010, 03:07 PM
Shoot it, just be careful and do not abuse...

Guns are made for shooting, but that does not mean you cannot baby certain ones. In my case if I had this one, I would make a "Range Queen" out of it.

hogcowboy
December 18, 2010, 03:33 PM
I personally think a gun should be shot. Any gun worth having is worth shooting. So should it.:D

Waywatcher
December 18, 2010, 03:34 PM
I agree with others in that this piece is not rare enough to warrant concern.

Shoot it, or sell it.

Personally I say shoot it.

JoelSteinbach
December 18, 2010, 04:06 PM
My favorite shooter and range gun

SwampWolf
December 18, 2010, 05:14 PM
I had the same "dilemma" after I bought an unfired Colt Cobra, with the original box and warranty. The good folks at the Colt site pleaded with me to keep it pristine or to sell it to a "serious" collector and to buy a beater to carry. After getting past a little consernation, I made my decision: It shoots just fine and rides in my pocket well concealed. :)

Sniderman
December 19, 2010, 09:43 AM
Have fun, shoot it!
I have a 1957 High Standard Sentinel Deluxe that, I believe, was mint (NO turn ring, Still in original box) ,when I bought it a few years ago.
I, and some of my friends, shoot it all the time, wonderful piece, great fun!
Although, when I bring it to the range, the box and paperwork stay home!

_____________________________

Welcome to Vermont, Get off my Lawn!

t_dickinson
December 19, 2010, 10:11 AM
Thanks for all the advice and overwhelming response - this place is a wealth of information.

I decided that since I couldn't make a decision I would let the aduience vote it out. After all, I'd have been wasting your time if I didn't take the advice I asked for.

So, I went to the range yesterday and put about 50 rounds through it. Ohhhhh Boy! To think I almost stuck this in pistol pergatory. I think this will be a range queen as someone suggested. I can't believe I almost denied myself the pleasure of my first revolver. Now my autos are going to collect some dust while I collect more wheelies!

New thread coming on care and maintenance...

22-rimfire
December 19, 2010, 11:36 AM
Range Queen is a very apt term, I think. Take care of it and maybe the turn line will become a little more visible, but it will still be a 98% gun.

The other side of the story is that it might in fact have been unfired and the cylinder trace happened at the factory or at the gun shop prior to the first sale.

MrBorland
December 19, 2010, 01:11 PM
I think this will be a range queen as someone suggested. I can't believe I almost denied myself the pleasure of my first revolver.

Good for you! That sweet M15 is the perfect vehicle with which to practice and maybe one day master The Art of The Revolver. Shoot it often and treat it well, but remember, too, that honest wear (and yes - from a holster, too) is a sign of a good student. Good luck & keep us posted!

Waywatcher
December 19, 2010, 02:41 PM
My sole auto does tend to gather dust nowadays as well.

My revolvers are just more fun. To shoot and reload for.

So how'd it shoot?

krazykeny
December 19, 2010, 03:04 PM
There were simply too many of them made to ever become a "collector"
Example is a model "A" Ford, antique? sure !
There were 4 million of them made and you can buy them around ten thousand dollars.
Car nuts drive them every weekend when the weather is good.

fmcdave
December 19, 2010, 10:11 PM
I don't think I could own a gun I couldn't shoot.

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