Black Powder Kit Guns


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InkEd
January 3, 2011, 10:26 PM
Anyone have experience with working on these guns? I'm talking about the DIY Traditions style kits. It looks like they could be a fun project. Any thoughts?

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husker
January 3, 2011, 11:00 PM
I used to build CVA kits, when I was a kid.
Lots of fun. I still have a Kentucky kit that I won years ago. I will build it some day when I have grand kids.
Not a lot to them. sanding & lil wood putty. Stain & bluing. The brass butt plate can be a hard fit on some kits. make sure you get all the metal real clean before you try using the bluing kit.

higene
January 3, 2011, 11:48 PM
I have built two Lyman kits, one pistol and one rifle. The kits were easy builds. All of the inletting was done. I got all of the advice that I needed from this forum and the instructions included in the kits. The result was high quality High functioning guns. Traditions and CVA kits are pretty much the same.

The next step up would be something from Sitting Fox or Track of the Wolf. They are higher quality kits (and more exensive). They take more skill and the inletting is more $ or up to the assembler. Some of the kits on Sitting Fox do come inleted

I am currently coveting a Sitting Fox flintlock and am saving up my $$. I still plan on having them do the inletting.

Good Luck and keep us informed and don't be afraid to ask questions.

fspitzdorf
January 4, 2011, 12:54 PM
Most of the inletting done on the pre-carves from Sitting Fox, TOTW, Chambers, so on and so forth, is just a starting point. You will have to open them up manually to size them to the components. They just remove a bunch of wood so you don't have to tediously do it.

Zeke/PA
January 4, 2011, 01:30 PM
I have built several T/C Hawkin type kits fot myself and for friends.
A very nice rifle can be the result if care is taken.
Lots of hand work on the rough cast brass and "draw filing " and polishing the barrel.
On the stock itself, there usually is enough wood to truly achieve a rather slim custom look.
I have used both the Birchwood Casey Brown and Blue solutions with good results and Tru-Oil for the stock finish.
Have Fun

Snowdog
January 4, 2011, 10:31 PM
InkEd, I literally just finished my Pedersoli Harper's Ferry kit tonight and though it took only about 5 hours of sanding, it would have been at least twice that had I not given up and resorted to using a Dremel.

The brass pommel was so rough that I wasn't making any headway with emery cloth. A fine grit grinder followed by a felt polisher and polish made a world of difference.

I also received my FFFG and FFFFG Goex this morning, so I was able to prime the pan to see how well it worked. It will ignite, but there's something obviously funky with the geometry of the lock with my Harpers Ferry; ignition is about 50% and I can tell the flint is getting bashed. However, it looks and feels great.

In retrospect, unless the price was too appealing to pass up, I don't think I'll go the kit route again. I just don't think I have the patience for it, being the instant gratification type that I unfortunately am. However, if you are the patient type, kits certainly can be a rewarding project.

ryzman
January 11, 2011, 10:50 PM
i cant wait to start my Lyman Great Plains rifle kit! Traditions isnt as good based on the hours of research i have been doing. I was going to buy a Deerhunter kit but changed my mind due to the great reviews of Lyman rifles.

arcticap
January 12, 2011, 01:33 AM
i cant wait to start my Lyman Great Plains rifle kit! Traditions isnt as good based on the hours of research i have been doing. I was going to buy a Deerhunter kit but changed my mind due to the great reviews of Lyman rifles.

That may be true unless a person wants to shot sabots or conical bullets. Then the Deer Hunter's 1 in 48" twist might have a significant advantage over the 1 in 60" twist of the GPR.
The Deer Hunter also has a nipple/drum ignition which some folks prefer for ease of cleaning, it's lighter and handier for hunting and carrying for long hours in the field, and it also has adjustable fiber optic sights.
So it's not only about the price or perceived quality of a gun, but also about the actual features that it offers and their desirability to each individual buyer who decides which gun will better fulfill their needs and expectations. :)

Black Toe Knives
January 12, 2011, 02:40 AM
InkEd, I literally just finished my Pedersoli Harper's Ferry kit tonight and though it took only about 5 hours of sanding, it would have been at least twice that had I not given up and resorted to using a Dremel.

The brass pommel was so rough that I wasn't making any headway with emery cloth. A fine grit grinder followed by a felt polisher and polish made a world of difference.

I also received my FFFG and FFFFG Goex this morning, so I was able to prime the pan to see how well it worked. It will ignite, but there's something obviously funky with the geometry of the lock with my Harpers Ferry; ignition is about 50% and I can tell the flint is getting bashed. However, it looks and feels great.

In retrospect, unless the price was too appealing to pass up, I don't think I'll go the kit route again. I just don't think I have the patience for it, being the instant gratification type that I unfortunately am. However, if you are the patient type, kits certainly can be a rewarding project.
Lick your finger and wipe your pan with wet finger then pour your flash powder and pour off the excess what sticks is right amount of flash powder.

fspitzdorf
January 12, 2011, 10:55 AM
A dab will do ya....

artee
January 12, 2011, 12:05 PM
I put a CVA .50 Mountain "hawken style" rifle together in 1980. Built it right in the dorm room... Still have and shoot it. Good rifle. Great double set trigger lock provided. Kinda cheesy "bolster" compared to a TC Hawken.

Long time ago, so take with a grain of salt.

It seemed to be pretty well inletted. I don't think I did anything BUT heavy sanding for barrel fitting and making the nose cap, butt plate and other metal parts fit flush. The inletting for the trigger guard was too deep I think, and I left it that way, kinda deep set with the edges of the guard below the wood.

Seems like the dovetails required some hand filing. May have had to hit several other areas with a file also, but can't remember now. Distinctly remember a little wood file/rasping before the sandpaper work.

I used a Birchwood Casey "Browning" kit. I really liked how the "Browning" came out and it always seemed more authentic than blueing to me. You needed to hang the barrel and heat it with a propane torch. That caused me concern i'd "de temper" the metal or weaken it. Worrywart. I was an ME major and used buffing wheels, drill presses etc in some of the school labs 'after hours'. It wasn't a class project (though one instructor had us build our own sheath knives to illustrate the "points" of his class throughout the semester). I could have done everything with only hand tools just as well.

Used wood stain and then Tru Oil for the stock. Had redone several M1's with Tru Oil before doing this one. Lot easier on a "new" stock than removing old finish and redoing.

Arcticap makes EXCELLENT points. I bought a kit because it was cheap. I knew it had a 1/66 twist which would make it a round ball only gun. It's accurate at 100 yards with a patched round ball, but my buddies TC Hawken had a 1/48 and could shoot the Maxiballs real well. I always felt "left out". It was on sale in the gunstore window for $110. That was very important at the time. In perspective, a round trip Denver/Chicago United airline ticket was about $180 (pre deregulation) , the kit or the factory built version went for $150 (not sure which), a new Rugar M77 WHOLESALED at $170 to a small dealer and sold for about $200--almost same for a FIXED 4X Leupold scope, a box of .270s or .30-06's would go ON Sale before hunting season for four and a half bucks (at TARGET--back when the Logo MENT something).

ryzman
January 14, 2011, 12:47 AM
ya for sure if weight and length is a priority as it is with most of us then choose wisely as the Lyman kit will be quite heavier.
I was not pleased with the lock on my traditions kentucky rifle. It felt cheap and they did not give me enough wood on the stock to make everything fit nicely.
I have yet to get my Lyman kit and might change my mind but for the money you would have a hard time beating it i think.
I dont know just be patient and read up on what others think. Thats how i ended up leaning towards the Lyman kit.

robhof
January 14, 2011, 12:27 PM
Has anyone tried the Kyper flint replacement for sale on Ebay, I just got one and it even lights 777. It's the striker parts from a lighter, using the cig lighter flint in a small metal frame that fits the flint slot in the hammer, not traditional, but guaranteed spark. I haven't fld tested it yet, but did try different powders in pan and Pyrodes and 777 both ignighted with it.:D:D:)

PapaG
January 14, 2011, 06:06 PM
Kits are fun to build from but normally will bring less later on than a factory gun.

Correct priming method for a flintlock is enough ffffg to about half fill the pan, then tilt to the "outside" a little to bank the powder away from the touchhole...ignition will "shoot" the fire through the touchhole.

Watching the pros at Friendship taught me that one....almost as fast as a caplock.

mdauben
January 15, 2011, 05:19 AM
I put together a CVA Hawken back in the day (1980's), so things may have changed.

The barrel and fittings didn't require any additional finshing (other than browning the barrel and other steel parts). No additional work on the inletting was necessary, either. The stock did need some significant filing/sanding to take the wood down to be even with the metal butt plate, but that was easy enough. All in all I thought it went together very nicely.

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