Uberti 1875 Outlaw fouling issues


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Garys001
January 4, 2011, 09:15 AM
Hey guys,

Just got a Uberti 1875 Outlaw for Christmas. It's chambered for 45 Colt black powder cartridges.

I got to shoot it for the first time yesterday and loved it, but had a small problem. After 12 shots, it completely fouled and I was unable to cycle the cylinder.

I cleaned the gun when I got it and it had a light layer of oil before shooting. I used ammo from Buffalo Arms, 250 grain RNFP black powder (Swiss Powder I think). Definitely a full load.

Should this be expected? I was hoping to be able to shoot more than that before having to clean it. Should I bring a cleaning solution and wipe the cylinder face and clean the chambers after every 6 to 12 shots? Also, it was fairly cold here, low 30's, could that have something to do with it?


Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Gary

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junkman_01
January 4, 2011, 09:54 AM
Welcome to the world of black powder! :evil:

WALKERs210
January 4, 2011, 10:10 AM
From my experience which is limited, OIL or petroleum based lube do not mix with black powder. And as Junkman said- welcome to the world of Black Powder. It is addictive, dirty, smelly and very addictive.

Garys001
January 4, 2011, 11:27 AM
I love it, that's for sure. I just want to get a lot more efficient at it!

I cleaned the gun with soap and hot water after shooting and then blew it out with canned air. I then lubed it with Ballistol, so I'm hoping that's more friendly with black powder and that may help a little. We'll see.

Thanks,
Gary

Tommygunn
January 4, 2011, 12:08 PM
It may be just a matter of shooting it a bit and wearing it in a little.

rcflint
January 4, 2011, 01:24 PM
The 1875 Remington has a fairly short gas ring, so a lot of fouling gets blown into the axis of the cylinder. You probably need Big Lube Bullets from Dick Dastardly or similar to get as much lube as possible blown into the cylinder gap. Maybe also a lube cookie under the bullet. Others with experience shoooting that revolver with BP can add advice.

Lube the cylinder pin with undiluted Ballistol and/or Bore Butter.

Vinegar Windex helps wash off fouling (not Ammonia Windex). Or Moose Milk made from Ballistol.

arcticap
January 4, 2011, 01:39 PM
Maybe you'd like to try one of the substitute powders while you're breaking it in:

http://www.blackhorn209.com/loaddata/

http://www.hodgdon.com/basic-manual-inquiry.html

http://www.americanpioneerpowder.com/loading.html

BHP FAN
January 5, 2011, 03:46 AM
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/ultramax-long-colt-45-cal-250gr-rnfp-250rds.aspx?a=51380
this is smokeless black powder equivilant Cowboy action ammo, but if you want to shoot black powder use plenty of Bore Butter as cylinder pin lube.I have a lot of Remmies, and they all run smooth when you ''butter'' up the pin with this stuff.
https://secure.tcarms.com/store/natural-lube-1000-plus-bore-butter-in-a-tube-cat-no-7309.html

Foto Joe
January 6, 2011, 10:18 AM
Keep in mind that when these guns were introduced, they weren't necessarily intended to go to the range with, they were for self defense or to put food on the table. Multiple re-loadings between cleanings wasn't something that happened a lot. When the gun was empty, they pulled another one.

I've loaded quite a few 45 Colt cartridges with Black Powder and found this out: "Historically Correct" loads i.e. about 40gr of powder will foul the cylinder pin quickly. Cutting back on the load to 20-25gr even with Swiss and a lighter bullet greatly reduces the fouling while maintaining a decent muzzle velocity.

Garys001
January 6, 2011, 12:05 PM
Foto,

Good point. That's what I'm currently shooting, aprrox 40gr of powder.

I've heard that Swiss burns a little cleaner than Goex, but if I go with a lighter load (20-25gr) what do I fill that empty space with?

Packman
January 6, 2011, 07:38 PM
You can use a number of things as a filler. Lots of people like Cream of Wheat, personally, I use Corn Meal.

I load my 1858 Pietta .44 with about 25 grains Pyrodex (switching to BP soon though) and then a .38 Special case full of corn meal. That generally brings the ball to just shy of the mouth of the cylinder. I put a lubed wad under the ball every other cylinder to cut down on fouling.

Foto Joe
January 8, 2011, 12:06 PM
I load my 1858 Pietta .44 with about 25 grains Pyrodex (switching to BP soon though) and then a .38 Special case full of corn meal. That generally brings the ball to just shy of the mouth of the cylinder. I put a lubed wad under the ball every other cylinder to cut down on fouling.

Garys001 & Packman

I also use CornMeal only because that's what my wife had in the cupboard the first time I used filler. It compresses easily and I haven't had any reason to change to another filler.

As far as the Swiss is concerned, I use it for cartridge reloading only, mainly because it's more expensive. I have about 150 45 Colts loaded with Goex which I haven't shot yet and they are light "Gallery Loads" so I don't expect any problems with those.

I switched from using Round Balls to bullets a few months ago after ClemBert sent me a link regarding Dash Caliber bullets. I've been VERY impressed with these things!! For 45 Colt I use El Paso Pete's Ultra Gamers (EPP's) (http://www.dashcaliber.com/big_lube_2_7.html) which are 150gr Round Nose bullets. I'm only using 20gr 3f and then I fill the brass with cornmeal and compress to the appropriate seating depth. They perform well and fouling is minimal, but I do pull the cylinder pin at least every three loads and wipe it down with Ballistol. It's not that the cylinder will foul, it's the fact that if I don't I will have to get into a wrestling match to get it out.

By using lubed bullets, you can illiminate the lubed wads entirely. I used to hand lube each round ball with SPG, what a PIA that is. Also these things are CHEAPER than round balls!! I also use the Dash Caliber bullets for 44 Russian, 44 Special, 38 S&W and 44-40, but unfortunately he doesn't make the EPP's in that size. The lube he uses is a propriatory formula but I'm guessing that it contains mink oil and beeswax, but that's just a guess.

Regarding "Store Bought" Black Powder cartridges, it would be my guess that you would be hard pressed to find them loaded with a expensive powder like Swiss. It would make more sense that they would be loaded with about the most in-expensive powder available.

ironhead7544
January 8, 2011, 03:24 PM
Users report good results with the Big Lube bullets. They also use a compressed charge of FF. Theres a compression die available that seems to make the black powder burn cleaner. Im going to try it with my 44/40 and 44 Special loads.

rusty from italy
January 11, 2011, 11:29 AM
Gary, i don't think Uberti outlaw is only for black powder cartridge, i have one in 44/40 and i reload my round with smokeless, black powder in this revolver is good but not the only "fuel" you can load!
Look the marks if you find a "PSF" mark go quite with smokeless too:)
Rusty

StrawHat
January 11, 2011, 11:46 AM
Foto Joe ... "Historically Correct" loads i.e. about 40gr of powder ...

Historically correct loads encompass a variety of loading from around 25 grains of powder up to the mentioned 40 grains and maybe even more.

The military started with 49 grains but quickly backed it down to 28 grains and that is the charge with which the cartridge earned it's reputation. Also the ballistics that the 45 ACP strove to emulate.

I tend to use however much black powder (2F) fits in the case and allows me to seat a 255 grain bullet.

andrewstorm
January 12, 2011, 04:51 PM
777 and a silicone cloth my revolvers never have bound up ,and cleanup is a snap with rubbing alcohol and a gub brush.

BHP FAN
January 12, 2011, 06:44 PM
Hot water,and a smidge of dish soap.Spray a paper towel with a little WD 40, and give it a rub down...works for me.

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