Faster cleaning methods


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Pyro
January 6, 2011, 03:33 AM
I'm searching for quicker ways to clean my black powder revolver. Honestly the only thing putting me off from buying more is the bothersome cleaning process, and I know there has to be an easier way.
My first question is how clean is clean? I try to get every little speck of fouling out of the barrel and cylinders for fear of corrosion. I clean the gun spotless because I simply do not know what is a responsible amount of fouling I may leave in the gun and not worry about rusting.

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madcratebuilder
January 6, 2011, 07:04 AM
I go to some shoots a two hour drive from home, I'll take a half dozen revolvers. The last thing I want to do when I get my tired butt home is clean them.. I well remove the grips and let the dishwasher clean them. Spray them down with Ballistol and wait till morning to properly lube and assemble. I've done this a half dozen times or more and never had any problem from it, other than the ball and chain giving me the evil eye. YMMV

messerist
January 6, 2011, 10:16 AM
I'm gonna have to try that MCB. I am in a similar situation as you only when I get home the "ball and chain" is at the door waiting to hand off the Children of the Apocalypse. You can imagine what it is like trying to clean little gun parts with little hands trying to help. Do you remove the cylinders and nipples before you wash them?

kwhi43@kc.rr.com
January 6, 2011, 11:31 AM
After a day's shooting, I clean mine at the range. No guns to clean when I
get home. Take the nipples out scrub the whole thing with a tooth brush and
blue wind shield washer . Wipe dry spray with WD-40 Takes me about 10
min. at most.

Pyro
January 6, 2011, 11:33 AM
Unfortunately I do not have a dish washer. I clean everything by dunking the barrel/cylinder assembly into a bucket of very hot soapy water then scrubbing. The first treatment will get rid of most all the fouling but remnants will show up, especially in the nooks and cranny's. Will the soapy water kill the corrosive elements? Is it similar to when I shoot corrosive ammo out my mosin nagant? I run windex down the barrel then a patch or two and call it a day with no problems. Will pyrodex/black powder work like this?

messerist
January 6, 2011, 01:42 PM
Question. What is in the windshield washer fluid that cleans the gun? Sounds like an inexpensive solution:).

Old Time Hunter
January 6, 2011, 01:46 PM
I go to some shoots a two hour drive from home, I'll take a half dozen revolvers. The last thing I want to do when I get my tired butt home is clean them.. I well remove the grips and let the dishwasher clean them. Spray them down with Ballistol and wait till morning to properly lube and assemble. I've done this a half dozen times or more and never had any problem from it, other than the ball and chain giving me the evil eye. YMMV
You must have been watching what I do!

My wife gets alittle aggitated too, her white dishes start to turn a little grey, but my hand guns are all sparkly!

wittzo
January 6, 2011, 02:35 PM
Windshield washer is water, denatured alcohol, and blue color so you know there's something in your reservoir when you take off the cap or look at the side. I don't know the proportions off hand, but I'm pretty sure it's 90+% water and the rest alcohol and coloring, just like anything else you buy pre-made in a store. They're charging a lot for a gallon of water.

The water does the cleaning, the alcohol helps evaporate the water left over so you won't have streaking when the wipers do their thing.

From what I've read here and other places, it's the water that does most of the cleaning. All the components of BP during manufacture are water soluble. All the components of fouling left over from shooting BP are water soluble, the alcohol evaporates the water left over after the contaminants are washed away. Heated water does better because it speeds up the breakdown of the solubles. You don't have to use as many patches if you use scalding water than room temperature water.

Natural lubes mix with the contaminants when the heat of the combustion takes place, so they'e bonded to the water soluble contaminants and makes them slick. If you use a petroleum based lube of some sort, it bonds in a different way, that's why you get hard and crusty contaminants that are hard to get off because they're not insoluble; the water can't flush them away, you have to chip them off with a brass brush or a dental pick.

The substitutes are different than real BP, so they act differently and opinions vary about what's best to use, I don't have the money to invest in the materials to study what Windex with or without vinegar actually does, or the ammonia, and so forth. It would just be uneducated guesses, but I figure the water and ammonia or vinegar do the cleaning and the alcohol helps get the remaining water out.

rcflint
January 6, 2011, 04:53 PM
Hot water and detergent/Simple Green or such cleans BP guns very quickly, black powder fouling washes out with water with one or two wipes. They clean up easier and cleaner than smokeless. Smokeless carbon in a cylinder needs carburator cleaner to cut it. Actualloy, shooting and cleaning black powder will clean the carbon from a previouslyn "cleaned" smokeless gun.

Other than the need for drying the steel, bp is easier to clean than smokeless, a secret well kept. Stainless bp guns clean very fast and don't rust.

bp_cowboy
January 6, 2011, 05:11 PM
I remove the wedge pin and take apart, then drop in a 5 gallon bucket of hot soapy water and let sit till the next day. Been doing that for a while and never had a problem. Wood grip looks a little warn, but it seems to be holding up.

Geneseo1911
January 6, 2011, 10:17 PM
anybody ever tried an ultrasonic cleaner? Hot water, a little detergent & ammonia....

Works great in theory..

Jaymo
January 6, 2011, 10:50 PM
I have a customer who has some big ultrasonic cleaners. I'd love to borrow one for BP cleaning.
Lately, I've been using Windex with vinegar. Seems to work very well.

Ghost Dog
January 6, 2011, 11:47 PM
I've only been shooting BP for about a year now and have never liked putting my guns in water, so I've been cleaning them with WD40 then coating them with olive or canola oil before putting them away. It's fast and easy and so far working very well.

G D

Noz
January 7, 2011, 10:50 AM
Over thinking!

After shooting, go home and have a beer. Next day or the day after or sometime this week:Spray the guns with moosemilk(1 part Ballistol to 7 parts water)(mix is my preference-others go as low as 5 parts water to a high of 10) Pull a bore snake through the barrels. Run a mop into each chamber(some pull the nipples for every cleaning, I don't)
Wipe the exterior of the gun down with the moose milk. Dry with air compressor, hair drier, heat gun. Spray the whole gun with Ballistol, WD 40 Breakfree, RemOil etc. Wipe down and put away.
Black powder is not corrosive. Any left on the gun treated as above will have oil in it and will not cause damage. I take the grips off of my guns only when repair is needed. The fouling mixed with the moose milk formns a slick grease that unless left for several years does not interfere with operation in any way.

rcflint
January 7, 2011, 01:22 PM
Noz is right. I often clean bp revolvers with MPro7 or Moosemilk without immersing parts in water. As long as bp fouling is full of the oil from Moosemilk, WD-40. Brea-kFree or such, it will not absorb water from the air and cause rust.

You should not immerse yoour wood grips in water.

Back in the day, bp firearms rusted because the caps were Mercury Fulminate, which is corrosive. Modern made caps are not corrosive. In a dry climate like Arizona you can leave a bp revolver for weeks before cleaning without corrosion.

Pyro
January 7, 2011, 03:06 PM
I like the WD-40 method. Scrub under the faucet, then a spray of wd-40 and your done.
Thanks for answering my question, whether or not powder fowling will remain corrosive if given a treatment of oil.

Black Toe Knives
January 7, 2011, 03:35 PM
I fill the sink full of very hot water and soap. I take the handles off drop the whole gun in the water and let sit for a few minutes. I run a swap in cyclinder and barrel. I wipe the rest down with a rag. Then a wipe down with a good gun oil.

Takes me more time to load it. Wait that ain't saying much.

madcratebuilder
January 8, 2011, 09:10 AM
I'm gonna have to try that MCB. I am in a similar situation as you only when I get home the "ball and chain" is at the door waiting to hand off the Children of the Apocalypse. You can imagine what it is like trying to clean little gun parts with little hands trying to help. Do you remove the cylinders and nipples before you wash them?
I remove the grips, cylinder, leaving the nipples in place. Wash on HOT, after a short "heated dry" I remove the parts and spray with Ballistol on a cookie sheet and let them set overnight. Never had a issue with the nipple threads. I kept an eye on that the first few times I did this. I think the key is the Ballistol as it is an emulsifier and pulls any residual moisture from around the nipple threads.

I hear you about the "helping hands" I'm working with my second gen set.

J-Bar
January 8, 2011, 09:26 AM
If there are a lot of different ways to do a job, they all work; there is not a "best" way. Otherwise, everyone would be doing it just that one way.

This observation was given by a professor of surgery while he was presenting the various surgical approaches to the hip joint in a lecture about 30 years ago...

Foto Joe
January 8, 2011, 11:38 AM
I attempted to use my "Dishwasher" only one time and the results were less than pleasing. She informed me that she was happy to do the dishes every nite, but cleaning smelly black powder guns that she didn't even shoot, wasn't gonna happen.

Ya gotta try everything just to see how it works don't ya?

Nicodemus38
January 9, 2011, 06:56 PM
get yourself a spray bottle of Hoppes Elite

it works

WALKERs210
January 9, 2011, 09:42 PM
Can't do it now but for several years all I had to do was hand everything over to my son. From age 12 up to about age 16 he could disassemble almost any weapon clean it and have it reassemble quicker than most. Then he got older and found out that this was no longer a teaching / learning thing but me getting out of work. Have tried to use same approach with my wife, but she will not fall for it and she hates the smell of cleaning BP

ExtremeGunCare
January 9, 2011, 11:48 PM
Hi Pyro,

I know black powder is a huge pain to clean. I would recommend prepping the gun with products that will help protect the bore/metals/finishes. Products I am familiar with and use often are Dyna-Bore Coat and Dyna-Gun Shield.

But don't just go on my recommendation, take a look at products that are on the market that can coat the gun to make it easier to clean after shooting. Technology has been mazing in this aspect of protecting the gun.

Good Shooting,

Jason Lumetta
ExtremeGunCare (http://www.extremeguncare.com)

A. Walker
January 10, 2011, 08:44 AM
+1 Hoppes elite. Hoppes #9 is good, too. And Ballistol. Stay away from the water, dishwashers (!?!) and other doubtful solutions and protect your hobby and investment.

mykeal
January 10, 2011, 11:01 AM
Now I've heard everything:
Stay away from the water,... and other doubtful solutions
Now, I really don't care if you want to spend your money on the latest gimmick cleaning products - it's your dough, spend it any way you want, and stay as far away from water as you want - but calling water a 'doubtful solution' is really over the top. Simply amazing.

VA27
January 10, 2011, 02:08 PM
Pull off the grips, field strip, rack it up in the dishwasher (bottom shelf, pot and pan cycle, heated dry), spray with moose milk, wipe down and reassemble. Done!

I discovered this method when a local pawn shop had a fire. He had about 30 guns with smoke damage. I told him I'd clean 'em for $3.00 each. Handguns went in the dishwasher, the long guns got 'scrubbing bubbles'. Took me about 2 hours.

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