Custom 1911 - what would you get?


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dandean316
December 28, 2003, 08:44 PM
I will be ordering a custom 1911 shortly. Since my budget is under $2500, I will probably go with a Rock River or Les Baer. Most likely the RRA. Ok, it's not really a true custom in some books, but I was hoping to get some opinions on what “add on's” or not, to get.

Or just people's suggestions and opinions on custom or semi-custom 1911's. (Please don't say get a Sig or Glock - or a Makarov):rolleyes: I am covered there.

I currently do not formally compete as time is an issue, but I do get out about 3 times a week to shoot. This will be my first single stack, single action 1911 – I have many double stack Para’s – and it will be used for mostly target shooting, maybe pins, and maybe plates.

It will never be carried and probably never see a holster. I am unsure if I should just get the Basic Limited Match or the Limited Match, but I will for sure get the 1 ½” guarantee as accuracy is my biggest concern. It will be the standard 5” barrel.

What would you suggest as far as upgrades or deletions and why?

I will take into account all opinions and suggestions. Here’s what I’m thinking so far:

Slide: Caspian? People seem to like them.

Frame: I have no idea. It needs to be single stack.

Barrel: I hear good things about Bar-Sto, but the owners can't seem to tell me why Bar-Sto is the best. :confused:
Sights: Dawson Precision optic front and adjustable rear.

Checkering: I hear different things about checkering of the trigger guard. Underneath some say is like sandpaper rubbing on your fingers everything you fire. Front some say if you put your finger on the front while shooting you will jerk your shots. I like the idea of the front of the guard to get a little better grip while preparing to lift and shoot for pins/plates.

Serrations: I am leaving them off the front of the slide for sure, but what about the flattened top and serrations? I like my friends CZ75 serrations on top, but they are about as narrow as the front sight. Looks kind of cool. I am not sure about the wider top serrations on the some models, but some say they help with quicker aims.

Supported Ramp cut – I am leaning no since I am told on .45's you don't need them. Good, bad, waste of money?

Thumb safety – Ambi or not. Reluctantly I am thinking to do it for weak hand competitions. Then the "wider" thumb safety or the thin ones?

Mag well – I have no idea here. Any opinions are welcome.

Finish – I want everything one color. Is hard chrome the way to go? My gun will most likely have little holster time. It will definitely not be carried.

I will listen to any suggestions and I thank you for all your help.

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AnklePocket
December 28, 2003, 08:54 PM
After a lot of research I went with a Rock River Arms Elite Commando with Heinie Sights and no front slide serrations. I like it clean and simple and that one did it. RRA seems to have shortened their lead times. Mine took about a year and a half, but I think it's under a year now. The trick is to order and forget it. You'll only be frustrated and slow down the process if you take personnel away from the bench. Their customer service is a lot better than it used to be, but the craftsmanship has always been the best value in the business, I think.
The Heinie rear sight seems to allow for a very quick sight picture for some reason. It just effortlessly whips on target.
I kept everything else standard.

1911Tuner
December 28, 2003, 09:21 PM
Howdy dan,

If you have that much to put into a pistol, why not go with the best?
Contact Ted Yost at Yost-Bonitz Custom Guns and talk to those
guys about building one to your specs. I've seen a few examples of
Ted's work, and it's second to none. He does his very best on every gun,
and his best is very good indeed.. If I were in the market for a full custom, that's where I'd go. The wait will be worth it.

Disclaimer: I have no vested interest in Yost-Bonitz, nor any personal relationship with Ted outside of these forums. My observations are based solely on the work that I've seen.

Luck to ya!

Tuner

Cactus
December 28, 2003, 10:30 PM
I agree with 1911Tuner!

Go buy a Colt 1991 NRM for around $550.00 and send it to Ted Yost. For $2000.00 or less, Ted could build you a VERY nice one of a kind pistol that you would be proud to own and pass on to your children.

Talk with Ted about what options you want and what he feels will work best for you. I don't believe Ted's turn around time is too bad right now, probably less than the wait for a Rock River.

John Forsyth
December 28, 2003, 10:54 PM
I agree. If you have that much to spend, why go with a factory-custom? There are several smith's out there who can build you what you want for less than your budget and you still get a 1 of a kind custom pistol.

My personal preferences:

Caspian frame and slide
Caspian extractor, ejector
Ed Brown safeties (grip and thumb as well as mag release)
Nowlin fire control (hammer, sear, disconnect, firing pin)
Wolff springs
Kart barrel
EGW bushing
Novak sights
Casul trigger
Nowlin pin set

My hands are not very large, so I like a medium to short trigger with a flat main spring housing.

25lpi checkering on the front strap with the main spring housing to match.

Stainless frame and components with a blue slide.

It will be in my hands next month. :D

9mmepiphany
December 29, 2003, 01:15 AM
i would take a look at the valtro before deciding to buy something else

www.valtrousa.com

it is wildly underpriced (about 1k under your budget) right now and you can have custom features (i'm partial to the ed brown thumb safeties) added by the designer himself (john jardine) when you order

as a more direct answer to your questions:

1. caspian make outstanding frames and slides
2. barsto really is the best (QC), but are you a good enough shot to see the difference?
3. checkering is the standard but it doesn't hold up very well if you happen to bump :what: it, i actually prefer serrations or conamyds www.m-guns.com
4. serrations atop the slide really do help align your eyes to the sights...they should cover a width determined by the base of your rear sight, you don't even need to flatten the top
5. if you are not going to carry the piece, go with the wider thumb safety...more space to lean your thumb away from the slide
6. i prefer a flared mag well with a long leadin rather than just a bevel...looks more "custom"
7. blued is beautiful when maintained well, hard chrome will hold up to rough usage better...it is easier to pickup black sights on a light cloured slide

JiminCA
December 29, 2003, 01:28 AM
Barsto are very good barrels. Rock River uses Kart barrels, which are just as good, if not better, as far as accuracy goes. Most of your best bullseye shooters use kart. But Kart barrels are not stainless steel.

Here is a pic of my two RR elite commandos. I think these are the best value in the business - about 1350 each with 1-1/2 accuracy guarantee back when I bought them. Went with Hienie straight-8's and brown thumb and grip safeties. Wish I'd thought to skip the front serrations, but I'm still a happy guy. Took a year to get.

If you do a search at 1911 forum you can find my range report on these guns. All the little bugs are ironed out now.

Good luck in your decision.

http://home.earthlink.net/~jlberkley/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/RR1.jpg

slh02
December 29, 2003, 03:40 AM
I know that if I had the money, I would go with Valtro. The pistols are nothing less than art, and the stories I have heard about customer service are almost unbelievable.

One day, I will own a Valtro!

John Forsyth
December 29, 2003, 07:39 AM
One more suggestion, call Terry Peters, http://www.pt-partners.com/ . He deals in the upper level of 1911's, Ed Brown, Les Baer, Wilson Combat, etc. Sometimes he a Vic Tibbets or Ted Yost gun for sale as well. The man knows custom 1911's and will not BS you.

Tim Burke
December 29, 2003, 08:26 AM
RRA does good work, and I agree with JiminCA that they are one of the best values in the market. However, $2500 will buy a lot of 1911. If you are willing to wait, you could go to any number of custom builders and stay under budget. I'd recommend Chuck Rogers (http://www.rogersprecision.com/) but I think his wait is getting long. If $2500 is the maximum, but you would like to save some, then RRA sounds reasonable.

Sean Smith
December 29, 2003, 09:16 AM
OK, I've had 2 custom guns made for me (by Dane Burns and then Ted Yost) and here is my take on it:

1. Don't sweat the slide and frame choice. Rock River Arms uses their own brand of forged frames & slides, and they are fine. Other makers will build on Caspian, Nowlin, Wilson, CMC, etc. frames & slides, or start with production guns like Colts. You almost have to go out of your way to find a BAD choice here.

2. Kart and Bar-Sto are the most popular barrels for competitive bullseye pistols, with Bar-Sto having the rep for best accuracy with hardball (as opposed to light semi-wadcutter loads). But Nowlin, Ed Brown, KKM, Wilson and Schuemann are also good choices, along with others I may have forgotten. Arguably, the most accurate pistol barrel you can buy is a Schuemann AET, but they are priced accordingly.

3. Checkering: totally personal preference here, no real objective benefit one way or the other. I don't like checkering at all.

4. A flat-topped & serrated slide makes the front sight look taller & easier to pick up, but to tell you the truth I've had guns with both & they don't make a lick of difference to me.

5. Skip the ramped barrel unless you are playing with cartridges with high pressures (unlike .45 ACP). Total waste of time otherwise.

6. Thumb safety is just personal preference. For a game gun I'd get the big gas pedals, for a practical weapon I'd get the smaller ones, or just skip the lot of them & use a single-sided Colt commercial-style thumb safety.

7. Magwell is nice for a game gun, less so if you actually want to carry the gun around.

8. Hard chrome is about the toughest thing going and will reduce corrosion better than bluing. I've got it on one of my guns and am very happy with it.

http://www.imagemagician.org/images/igc_76543/bestdelta2.jpg

dandean316
December 29, 2003, 10:13 AM
Thanks for all the advice guys. Keep 'em coming if you want :) as it's interesting stuff here.

Based on various posts and a lot of thought on this, I am kind of thinking of ordering the RRA Basic Limited Match with the 1 1/2" guarantee and a Dawson front sight - kind of a "stock custom" then getting one of the Yost's of the 1911 world to build me something totally to my specs.

I figure you can't go wrong with 2 custom 1911's.

MoNsTeR
December 29, 2003, 10:35 AM
http://www.experimentalmachining.com

I'm getting ready to order a 6" SV-framed gun from Brian Hawley, which will run me about $2500 all told. His prices are reasonable, his turnaround times are good, and he's very responsive to e-mail. I'd check him out.

Though, if I were to get a nice single-stack, I'd probably go with a Valtro despite the wait. The value is just too good.

Greg45
December 29, 2003, 10:56 AM
I bought a NRM Colt and sent it off to Ted Yost several weeks ago for the 1* package. I also added chrome plating, tritium front sight, and front strap serrations. Even with all that, I'm still right around $1700.
About $200-300 less than a Brown or a Wilson, and a think a much better gun. Plus I don't have to look at those ugly front slide serrations.

It's my gun, and I ordered with the options that I wanted.

If you can stand the wait, this is the only way to go. It's still alot less wait time than ordering from Rock River.

scalinghammer
December 29, 2003, 12:25 PM
Everyone here has I lot of good ideas. I would only add information about one thing. Blueing wears and can rust. Chrome does not wear hardly at all and in far more rust resistant. There are several nickel-teflon type finishes that are almost as hard as chrome but resist rust much better and are much sliperyer(sp) that chrome. I have NP3 and Diamond Coated guns and chrome I am happiest with the NP3 and Diamond Coated guns. They need less lube and run dirty better. If you shoot 350-800 rounds per days for several days and either won't or don't clean everyday it helps to have a gun that will work dirty.

Ed

HankB
December 29, 2003, 12:45 PM
Many good 'smiths do really nice work. But it all depends on what you're looking for.

IMHO you should be able to get a really nice 1911 for around $1500, give or take a couple of hundred. For that, you'll have a well fitted, accurate, reliable, durable pistol, with good sights, a good trigger, ambi safety, checkered front strap, and beveled mag well. Maybe add a little for hard chrome, NP3, or other finish, but spend much more and you're only getting eye candy or paying the BNP premium. (BNP = Big Name Pistolsmith)

Now, I'd also consider a "combat dehorn" which will break all the sharp edges on the pistol a bit . . . usually if you shoot a couple of boxes of ammo you won't have a problem, but I've seen MANY fairly experienced shooters with their hands bandaged up after shooting well over 1000 rounds of hardball over a weekend class. I personally like just a *little* bevel done at the rear of the trigger guard near the mag release.

cratz2
December 29, 2003, 01:10 PM
I generally agree with most of the opinions expressed above... $2500 is a lot of coin for a single gun, esp if you don't have much experience with 1911 ownership. For $1500, you can get into a nice RRA or a Nowlin. Or if rollmarks aren't as important to you as functionality, a goon NM serial numbered Springfield and $800 spent with a custom tweaker/tuner.

There are plenty of great top names out there... some specialize in trick metal work, some specialize in race guns but almost all of them will build a very nice but relatively basic full house gun built up from scratch. Many like to work with Caspian frames and slides but there are plenty of other options. If you do go the full 'from the fround up' custom route, my best advice would be to do some research on different smiths and narrow it down to a couple names then tell them what you are generally looking for and give an honest open ear to them.

On the other hand, for someone that has never owned a single stack 1911, there's a lot to be said for picking up maybe a couple used guns - maybe a basic Springfield MilSpec or NRM Colt and either a Springfield or Kimber with a few more 'custom' features and see what suits you. You aren't going to lose much money on a used Kimber. You'll likely lose a crapload on a custom gun if you decide you want something significantly different.

Tracy Hightower
December 29, 2003, 01:22 PM
I will be ordering a custom 1911 shortly. Since my budget is under $2500

5 Glocks

Sorry, Could'nt resist.

:D

dandean316
December 29, 2003, 01:45 PM
You'll likely lose a crapload on a custom gun if you decide you want something significantly different. Good advice. Anyone see the RRA .40 on GunsAmerica? He has $2400 into it, and is looking to sell for $2200.

The reason I looked into the RRA was I walked into the shop looking for a Kimber Super Match or maybe a Kimber Gold Match. The owner told me for the same money, I can get the RRA which he had in stock. Then I noticed you can get the RRA however I wanted, which lead me down this path.

Sean Smith
December 29, 2003, 02:27 PM
Taking only a $200 loss on a used gun is hardly taking it in the shorts.

dandean316
December 29, 2003, 02:41 PM
Agreed, but no one has bought it yet either.

Maybe you should buy it and rebore it into a 10mm?:D

Sean Smith
December 29, 2003, 03:40 PM
Sorry, my wallet is in recovery mode. :neener:

Marko Kloos
December 29, 2003, 03:53 PM
Given that kind of budget, I would personally spend it on a Springfield Professional and be done with it. The Pro already has all the features I'd want in an "anything goes" 1911, when money is no issue.

cratz2
December 29, 2003, 04:00 PM
Yeah... a 10% loss isn't much to worry about but I think we've all seen guys sell very nice guns made by some very elite smiths for a considerable loss. :(

Sean Smith
December 29, 2003, 04:14 PM
I think we've all seen guys sell very nice guns made by some very elite smiths for a considerable loss.

Such as...? Not to be a wiseass (believe it or not :p), just curious. Because I haven't heard too many people getting hosed because they bought a Swenson or a Heinie. On the other hand, I wouldn't recommend custom guns as an "investment" either. To me, the whole question of resale value kind of misses the point of the exercise. Did my Dad buy that really nice table saw as an "investment"? Did he get "hosed" if table saw resale values tank? ;)

Funny thing is, I had no problem selling my Burns custom gun without taking it in the shorts. Found a buyer in about a day. It sucked having to sell it, but the "work" of selling it was pretty painless.

Given that kind of budget, I would personally spend it on a Springfield Professional and be done with it. The Pro already has all the features I'd want in an "anything goes" 1911, when money is no issue.

The whole point of getting a custom gun in my mind is to get something that you can't get off the shelf. If a Pro gives you what you want, why pay a 'smith to reproduce it instead of just buying the Pro? On the other hand, not everyone wants a gun with the features that other people think they should have on their gun, either.

One thing I'd suggest is that if you don't already have clear-cut preferences for features on a custom 1911, maybe you shouldn't go buy one yet.

JiminCA
December 29, 2003, 11:25 PM
One thing I'd suggest is that if you don't already have clear-cut preferences for features on a custom 1911, maybe you shouldn't go buy one yet

That is the problem in this thread. The original poster hasn't used a 1911 enough to know what he does and doesn't want. There's little point in getting a custom built if you can't benefit from getting it done the way you want to suit your shooting style, strengths and weaknesses.

My recommendation is to get a used Wilson CQB, Protector, 96A2, Classic, etc. They're out there in very good shape for 12-1400 bucks. Wilson will honor the warranty for used buyers. Shoot the thing and figure out what you like and don't like. Then go get a custom. You will be able to sell the Wilson it for pretty much what you paid for it (although I'd bet you probably won't sell it).

Or just get a good base model Kimber. Not one of the upper models, just the classic custom. Find a nice used Series I gun and shoot it. Again, should hold its value given the desire out there for Series I guns. A classic custom with a nice set of Hogue grips and some Heinie or Novak sights is a great shooter, and all you have to do is spend 100 bucks for the sights and grips. You don't even need that stuff but it will make the gun nicer.

You need some experience before you can make this choice. It is like picking components for a sound system when all you've done is read magazines about sound systems. You have to go listen to make your choices.

In your case you have to go shoot in order to make intelligent choices. Don't rush the process - enjoy it. 1911's are definitely a process in terms of learning the guns and exercising all the options.

Good luck.

John Forsyth
December 29, 2003, 11:37 PM
Well said JiminCA. Good post.

9mmepiphany
December 30, 2003, 01:56 AM
picking just the right custom touches is a learning process. it does take some experience with the 1911 to see what works for you.

to that end i'd suggest the basic kimber also

denfoote
December 30, 2003, 06:36 AM
My idea of a custom 1911 would be to send my Springfield Loaded off to Larry Vickers for accurizing. But, since he only does a handfull of guns per year, I am afraid that I might be old and gray before I get it back!!

dandean316
December 30, 2003, 08:34 AM
One thing I'd suggest is that if you don't already have clear-cut preferences for features on a custom 1911, maybe you shouldn't go buy one yet
That is the problem in this thread. The original poster hasn't used a 1911 enough to know what he does and doesn't want. I should clarify a bit about these points. I have 11 Para Ordnance's at this time. That includes single stacks, double stacks, single actions and double actions. So, yeah, I don't have a "true" 1911 (single stack, single action) in many books, but it's not like I'm going from Glocks to a custom 1911 here. My original intent of the question was to get your opinions on certain features for my semi-custom 1911 RRA I will be getting. I figured if they can trick it out a bit for me, I'd ask some opinions and maybe get a couple of add ons. Simple extra stuff like top serrations and ambi safety.

How this all started is I wanted to get a nice Kimber, but for about the same money I can get a standard RRA. But then with the RRA I can get all these extras, so I started going down this custom path.

But Sean was right - since I am not sure if I want things like snake skin checkering or ivory grips, I shouldn't buy a custom yet.

So, I'm going to order the plain Jane RRA or see if anyone around town has a nice used Kimber. Then I'll take all these suggestions you guys gave me and trick out one of my Para's.
Thanks for all your help!:)

Ankeny
December 30, 2003, 11:11 AM
You can't go wrong with the RRA. I would suggest hard chrome if you are actually going to use the pistol. There is no reason why the gun wouldn't take you as far as you are willing to go in USPSA or IDPA shooting.

Harold Mayo
December 30, 2003, 11:28 AM
You have a lot of questions about custom guns for someone who is wanting to spend $2500 on one.

No offense, but I would recommend some extensive research on the web to start with (which you are doing) at sites like this one as well as:

www.pistolsmith.com
www.1911forum.com

Look at pictures, correspond with people...get a feel for what you should have that way.

Then try and find someone in your area with custom guns. There's nothing like trying something out to know whether you want it or not.

Talk to gunsmiths on the phone or in person. Go with someone you like personally (or as personal as you can get in a limited time).

You can spend a lot of $$$ on a custom gun and no be satisfied, especially if you're not familiar with what you want. I speak from experience.:uhoh:

OR, buy some used stuff and trade around. You'll most likely lose money in the long run, but you'll get an idea of what you want. Used RRA and Wilson guns are nice. Used Kimber custom shop stuff is pretty good. You can find plenty of custom guns out there. Check the auction and sales sites:

www.gunbroker.com
www.auctionarms.com
www.gunsamerica.com
www.snipercountry.com (the emporium)
www.sturmgewehr.com
www.glocktalk.com
www.ar15.com

Those are some of the major ones.

JiminCA
December 30, 2003, 11:41 AM
Denfoote: LV does jobs like what you have in mind in a few months or so, depending on his backlog and "real job" requirements. Reliability jobs, accurizing, and other minor work get done as he has time, and really don't take very long. Get what you want! Call the man up. It is only the full customs that have the really long wait times.

Back to Dandean316: 11 Paras! You certainly know something about 1911's. Given all of that you know enough to make intelligent choices in a semi-custom. RRA is a good choice because they'll use anyone's components. For instance, on mine I got Brown thumb and grip safeties. Try getting Baer or Wilson to do that! Anyhow, I'd suggest that you try something different - ie with different profile safeties than your paras (maybe Brown).

RRA will work with you to get what you want. That's one of the reasons why I earmark them as one of the exceptional values out there.

Good luck and good shooting.

PS: Here is some food for thought. I have some very nice high end 1911's, including Vickers, Brown, Baer, RRA, Wilson, and others. But here is the bottom line - I can shoot in IDPA just as well with a cleaned up Kimber classic custom. If the gun runs, is accurate, has good sights and trigger, then you have what you need. A tight gun cycles a bit smoother also. Lots of rounds can make a gun very smooth.

All of the rest of the stuff (checkering, flat-top slides, serrations, etc. are cosmetic stuff that I do pay for because I like it. But it doesn't add anything much to the shooting experience.

dandean316
December 30, 2003, 11:53 AM
Yes, I will most likely go with hard chrome. Although I like the blued better, I know the HC will hold up better. But even if I get the blued, I don't care if there's a few nicks and scuffs.

I never understood not using/shooting a gun. After selling all my Mustangs, I vowed to never get into anything that I had to worry about scratching again.

Ankeny
December 30, 2003, 03:08 PM
I am really suprised at the number of people who don't see the need to checker the front strap. I put checkering up pretty high on my list.

Sean Smith
December 30, 2003, 03:23 PM
Different strokes for different folks. :D

I dislike checkering myself.

Nightcrawler
December 30, 2003, 05:46 PM
When I saw the title of this thread, I was thinking that it'd be one where the poster was asking what custom 1911 you'd get if you had the bucks.

Frankly, just about every "custom" feature you can think of is now available on a mass produced pistol. Beveled magazine wells, checkering, front serrations, extended beavertail, etc., can all be had on a stock gun these days.

So, if you want a 1911-type with a beveled magazine well, frontstrap checkering, extended beavertail, commander hammer, front serrations, [insert big brand name here]-sights, extra heavy springs (one Les Baer I examined had a recoil spring so heavy I could barely retract the slide; the gun shop guy behind the counted considered this a sign of quality), and so on, there are guns from Wilson, Les Baer, Springfield, you name it.

Now if *I* had $2500 bucks to get my Colt customized....hmm..

I'd add an ambidextrious safety. Not the extended one, I don't like those, just an ambi one. Oh, and I'd replace the stock grips with nice walnut non-chekered ones. I think those look better.

And I'd probably put the other $2300 into my savings account so I can pay for college next year.

BUT...if you're not in college, $2500 can likely buy you a top-notch pistol. (One would hope...)

Just make sure you know what you want before dropping down that kind of coin.

Sean Smith
December 30, 2003, 07:18 PM
Frankly, just about every "custom" feature you can think of is now available on a mass produced pistol.

Indeed. Of course, it would be wise to not confuse superficial features with quality. Kimbers are cheaper than Ed Browns for a reason, and it ain't because Kimber is just that nice. ;)

cratz2
December 30, 2003, 07:26 PM
Such as...? Not to be a wiseass (believe it or not ), just curious. Because I haven't heard too many people getting hosed because they bought a Swenson or a Heinie. On the other hand, I wouldn't recommend custom guns as an "investment" either. To me, the whole question of resale value kind of misses the point of the exercise. Did my Dad buy that really nice table saw as an "investment"? Did he get "hosed" if table saw resale values tank?

You've been around Dane's site long enough to see guys selling guns that the paid $3,000 for for $2,000 and not getting any buyers very quick. There are a few names that seem to have desirable resale but there are many very fine builders that produce excellent guns that seem to have atrocious resale values these days.

I know that custom built 1911s are far from an ideal investement, my comment was directed right at the original poster that is doing research into a full house gun though he has never owned a basic MilSpec or a Springfield Loaded or a Kimber... Other than just to look very nice or to be able to say that you have a custom gun, the purpose of a custom gun is to get something built exactly the way you want it specifically built for you. How can one be prepared to make such decisions if you don't know if you prefer an arched or a flat MSH? Or if you prefer Heinies to Novaks?

Know what I mean? :p

dubb-1
December 30, 2003, 07:28 PM
I have been very impressed with all of the Rock River Arms 1911s that have come through our shop. I have sold several, and have more than a few on order. This is the one that I ordered for myself:

http://208.16.180.3/dubb-1/RRA1.jpg

Erik
December 30, 2003, 10:00 PM
I would select a Colt NRM 1991 and send it off to a reputable smith with a list of the work I wanted done to it. I would have consulted with the smith before hand, of course.

SnWnMe
December 31, 2003, 12:53 AM
Well, all these 1911s are nice and dandy but you really must get a PC945. You get quality, exclusivity and relatively low price all in one package.

I bought one last month. I just bought another one this month. I sold a Kimber to finance this...

Sean Smith
December 31, 2003, 08:33 AM
Well, all these 1911s are nice and dandy but you really must get a PC945. You get quality, exclusivity and relatively low price all in one package.

Translation: they didn't make many because there was no demand, and people still don't want them. ;)

C. H. Luke
January 1, 2004, 11:22 AM
For $2,500.00 I'd get Garthwaite or Vic Tibbets to build me one of their confections! And, it would come out to less than 2.5K too........

That said, am extremely happy with the used RR LTD bought with over 5K thru it.
I consider it to be a one-off "full Custom" 1911 rather than a semi-custom as all the components were spec'd out by the orig. owner. The 3 1/4 Lb. trigger pull is still "perfect" and a total disassembly revealed why. Everything that needed deburring & polishing, etc. was done and done right.

Peakbagr
January 11, 2004, 11:11 PM
Bullseye shooters are accuracy fanatics.
There is a reason no serious Bullseye shooters shoot chrome.
The slide to frame tolerances can't be made as tight with chrome and chrome wears faster in the Bullseye game where you can shoot thousands of rounds of practice a year.
I don't have a single chrome gun and there isn't a spot of rust on one of them.

HD
January 12, 2004, 01:09 AM
i would buy an original as nib 1911(prefer pre 1914) gvt model ...
strip it ,gauge and check every part for spec , have 1911 tuner check and doublecheck my conclusions (between us we have about 70 yrs experiance with 1911s) , then do nothing but learn to shoot it as it was issued ...
you can't get hurt $$$$ wise , and the accuracy and reliabilty are as good or better than most all of the otr 1911s available today....
all the fancy crap and hand fitting take away from what the gun really is ...
it was and still is the ultimate in a fighting handgun ...
try to make it anything else and you lose everything it was...
customs are nice , originals are better... and there won't be any more originals ever again...

gabeodog
January 12, 2004, 05:45 AM
2 Kimber TLE's

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