Look at your SP101...


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chuckdeez
January 17, 2011, 05:08 PM
Specifically where the hammer strikes above the transfer bar. Is there a strike mark? Mine has approx 200-300 rounds through it, and about that many dry fires. I just noticed this today. Wondering if its normal. Its far from deep, but you can tell theres something there both visually, and if you were to drag something over the mark itself. I would post a pic but its pretty self explanatory. Appreciate any input.

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357_
January 17, 2011, 07:09 PM
Yeah, it's been there as long as I've owned it. I bought it used, it was born in 94. And I've put at least a thousand rounds through it and twice that dry-firing since I bought it this summer.

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m122/mista_nice_guy/Sp-101/DSC02717.jpg

heavyshooter
January 17, 2011, 09:12 PM
Yep, mine has that mark as well. I do not recall how long ago I noticed it but it was not long after getting the revolver. As far as I know it was there when I bought it new in the box. I have dry fired about a thousand times and I have put several hundred rounds through it. It has never been a problem. Bang every time.

chuckdeez
January 17, 2011, 09:17 PM
Appreciate the effort in your response, especially taking the pic. I was pretty sure it was normal, but my only other revolver (s&w 617 circa '91) has absolutely no wear in that area, although I know it is a different design. I'll keep an eye out for serious peening or deformation I guess.

markallen
January 17, 2011, 09:39 PM
When you release the trigger, the transfer bar drops below the firing pin. The hammer then comes to rest on the frame.
Perfectly normal. Metal to metal contact, it's going to leave a mark.

Drail
January 18, 2011, 12:41 AM
Actually that mark on the frame is made when the hammer strikes the transfer bar and the frame when firing. Slightly more of the total energy is transferred to the frame than the transfer bar. If all of the hammer's energy were to strike just the transfer bar, it would break. It is a critical fitting operation and if misfit the transfer bar will not last long. If you hold the trigger back and lower the cocked hammer all the way down to the frame, and then slowly allow the trigger to go forward the hammer should not move at all (as the transfer bar moves down). If it does the transfer bar is holding the hammer up off the frame and the hammer will move forward a hair as the transfer bar moves down out from under it. If your hammer moves the fit is off. Fitting adjustment is made on the nose of the hammer that strikes the transfer bar. Test yours and see if the hammer moves any when the trigger goes forward. What you are describing is normal on a Ruger.

NMGonzo
January 18, 2011, 08:03 PM
same here ... is fine

Sauer Grapes
January 18, 2011, 08:26 PM
Same here, hammer doesn't move.

branshew
January 18, 2011, 10:50 PM
Look at your SP101...

"...Now back to me, now back to your SP101, now back to me. Sadly your SP101 isn't me, but if it stopped using .38 specials and shot more .357s, then it could shoot like me..."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owGykVbfgUE



Sorry - couldn't resist

chuckdeez
January 18, 2011, 11:41 PM
funny, but Im gonna guess that not many get it. Thanks to everyone else who responded.

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