Pistol for Daughter


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Gary G23
January 24, 2003, 05:52 PM
With my son-in-law heading off for the war effort, I'd like to get my daughter a pistol for home protection while he is gone. Most of my guns are 40 or 357 without manual safeties, but I feel a 9mm with a manual safety (she has a child in the home) would be best for her. What would you recommend given the parameters specified (9mm, manual safety)?

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Min
January 24, 2003, 06:18 PM
I'd recommend a Taurus PT-111/9mm. It's got one of those internal locks that she can use to disable the gun's functionality.

Plus, it's relatively cheap.

craigz
January 24, 2003, 06:23 PM
Beretta 92FS. Comfortable and fun to shoot, relatively cheap 15-rounders available, and an action that's smooth as glass and easy to hand cycle.

Mastrogiacomo
January 24, 2003, 06:47 PM
Advice from another female shooter, get her a 92FS Beretta 9mm. I have two Beretta type M compacts, which fire eight rounds. They're small, compact, manual safety, slender grip and very comfortable to shoot. Low recoil and highly accurate. However, I have the compacts in type M because of a permit restriction. If she can get the full size, I highly recommend them as well but if it's a smaller version she's after, have her check out the compact L and the compact M to compare. They're fantastic guns and I'm sure she'll be very pleased with how well they perform and how easy it is to maintain. Also, relatively inexpensive -- I don't have a job and own two Berettas so that should give you some idication of how affordable they are. :D

DAL
January 24, 2003, 07:02 PM
Take her to your favorite gun store, set the minimum caliber limit, and let her see what feels best for her. A Beretta might be right for her, but then again, it might not be. Make sure she can hold the gun in a straight line with the bones of her forearm (the radius and ulna, I believe). If she has to cant the gun out of alignment with the bones to reach the trigger, the gun is probably too big for her. When you find the right gun, buy a case of ammo and take her out to practice with it multiple times. Also, don't forget to teach her about safety, if she doesn't already know about it.

If she has small hands, you'll probably want to stay away from double-stack guns. Although I've never fired one, I do like the way the SIG P239 feels in my hand. Also, a single-stack 1911 in 9mm would probably fit just about anyone's hand (I'm guessing somebody makes this).

Good luck on your search, and let us know what she chooses.
DAL

Mastrogiacomo
January 24, 2003, 07:10 PM
I agree, let her decide but just to add -- I'm only 5'2" 115-120 lbs and have tiny hands that have been described as "piano hands" from my Italian instructor. In martial arts classes, I'm the delicate one...

As I said, if the Beretta in full size is "too much gun" which I doubt because it wasn't for me, go to the compacts. The M will have a more narrow grip. Also with narrow grips: the Beretta Cougar and Vertec -- both of which are available in 9mm. The best thing to do though is take her to a range to rent some guns and maybe try one of these out. Also, take her around the shops to feel how some of them handle to her grip. Lastly, take your time with the guns. Don't be too quick to buy. This should be a gun she actually practices with, not keeps in the closet for a rainy day. If that's all she plans for the gun, save your money and buy a dog...

Sisco
January 24, 2003, 08:43 PM
My niece bought a gun for protection at home, found out she got a Jennings .380. Took her out to the range where we spent most of out time clearing jams. I suggested she take the Jennings to a pawn shop and see how much they'd charge to take it off her hands and get a good 9mm. :evil:
She told me she had fired her father-in-laws Beretta and didn't like the recoil. She shot my Ruger P-95 and liked it, said it wasn't anything like the Beretta.
I've never shot a Beretta but I can't imagine that much difference in recoil between the two. Don't know what kind of ammo she was using in the Beretta, we were shooting +P handloads in the Ruger.

10-Ring
January 24, 2003, 09:13 PM
Let her decide..rent a bunch of guns & let her try them out...various guns & calibers. Discuss pro's & con's of each.

Bruz
January 24, 2003, 10:05 PM
When she is trying them out have her try a Walther P99 9mm...I know that alot of shooteres do not like tupperware guns, but it is very light and has adjustable, ergonomic grips. Have her get a Doberman too!

Mark IV Series 80
January 24, 2003, 11:01 PM
I wouldn't push your daughter into an autoloader....... a revolver is often the best choice for shooters with limited experience.

The revolver is easier to verify whether it's loaded or not, easier to load and unload (did she forget about the one in the pipe?)

The revolver is easier to learn...... what does this button do? What about this lever? What if it jams?

Women do not always have the hand strength to rack a slide, and many don't like to break their finger-nails by loading magazines, manipulating levers, and racking slides.

You could show her, and let her shoot, some small and medium-frame revolvers by Smith & Wesson and Ruger, and see which one she likes the best.

I wouldn't recommend an autoloader to anyone as their first defensive handgun.

Pico
January 24, 2003, 11:06 PM
Instead of hoping the child won't figure out how to take the weapon off safe think instead of a trigger lock and/or a gun safe.

That being said, find out if she can rack a semi-auto first. My wife has trouble with both of mine. If that's the case, put a revolver in her hands. If she has strength to rack it, Glock 19 or 26 even though they don't have a manual safety, CZ 75 compact/PCR, or Beretta 9000. For the last tell her to watch Minority Report and say it's Tom's gun.



Pico:)

Mastrogiacomo
January 24, 2003, 11:08 PM
Christ give me a break! :eek: Biggest mistake of my life in handguns was buying a revolver. Even my little hands can rack a slide. "What does this do, what does that do..." Take lessons! If you're going to buy a revolver and leave it in the closest, don't bother and just get a dog. The best investment in a gun is a pistol: whether it's a Beretta (my first choice) or a Glock, Sig, Walther, etc. The pistol should be her choice as she's buying it and using it at the range, but for the love of God don't push her to buy a revolver. I'm still kicking myself for giving in to the revolver hype. :fire: :cuss: :banghead:

Shane
January 24, 2003, 11:10 PM
Okay, your parameters are basically 9mm with a safety. You never said to rule out single action 9mm's though.


How about a Browning High Power? Just one mode of trigger pull to learn, and she still has a manual safety.



BTW, I also like Berettas as a couple posters mentioned. A beretta is a good choice.

I have one gripe though, if this thread (click to open thread) (http://www.berettaforum.net/cgi-bin/ubbcgi/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=6;t=003753) is true, Beretta is going with plastic parts more than my liking. Something to consider if its a new Beretta. I don't know whether or not this thread in the Beretta board is correct, I'm just throwing it out for discussion.

TarpleyG
January 24, 2003, 11:15 PM
I agree with Mark IV, a revolver should at least be considered. I don't know what people have against revolvers. I was going to get one for my wife and she said she didn't like it. Wanted a semi, she said. She knows VERY LITTLE about guns and I am slowly getting her in the swing. A revolver is easier for her to deal with.

GT

Shane
January 24, 2003, 11:19 PM
Oh, and I also agree with those that have given the advice to consider revolvers as well.

Mastrogiacomo
January 24, 2003, 11:22 PM
There are some wonderful pistols out there and choosing a gun should never be limited to not knowing how it works. This is why we go to NRA instructors, which anyone with a revolver should do as well. If this is her choice for a revolver great but don't let it be because she's afraid of the complicated look of a pistol. They aren't that complicated and it can be overcome with just a lesson or two on how to handle them. Pistols are also more accurate at a distance and in my opinion, easier to control. Unlike revolvers, pistols also have a manual safety.:)

Mastrogiacomo
January 24, 2003, 11:25 PM
Try the www.berettaforum.net for info on Beretta guns and their parts. It's a great site for info on all things Beretta. :D

Shane
January 24, 2003, 11:33 PM
Try the www.berettaforum.net for info on Beretta guns and their parts. It's a great site for info on all things Beretta.

Thanks for the link. I agree its a great site for info. The thread I linked to (three posts above) came from Berretaforum.net.

Nick96
January 24, 2003, 11:50 PM
I have to go with Mark IV on this. If she doesn't know enough about handguns to pick what she wants (and why) - then a revolver is a better choice. Probably nothing more than a .22 at that.

And the notion of a "safety" on a handgun passing for "child proofing" is absurd. The only "childproof" gun is one that is completely empty - gun and ammo separated and independantly secured. If she's afraid to leave a loaded revolver laying around - good - she should be. She needs to be as or more afraid of leaving a loaded semi laying around. If she wants a gun in the house, she needs to figure out a way that ONLY SHE can access it. Like a touch pad gunsafe or a padlock through trigger guard with the key on a string around her neck

I personally know a woman who got a semi, received instruction, went to the range and practiced with it and appeared to be knowledgable about it. But, in a rush to get the thing unloaded and out of the reach of the kids, managed to blow a hole in the floor with it. Luckily there wasn't a child or her head in the way when this occured.

The lesson learned - the simpler the better. Semi's (any size, shape, model or caliber) are for people that are "into" guns - period.

rick458
January 25, 2003, 12:18 AM
Many women like commanders even in .45

dairycreek
January 25, 2003, 01:07 AM
Is she strong? Does she have large hands? Is she a motivated learner as far as guns/shooting are concerned? I raise these questions because I have four daughter (all grown and gone now) and all of these questions (and many more) arose as I tried to teach them about guns and shooting. One became a "revolver person". Two became "auto persons" and the fourth just never got interested. My advice is to provide the best instruction you can and then just let her choose. Good shooting:)

Dienekes
January 25, 2003, 01:49 AM
We're long on variables and short on facts here. An NRA class would be a VERY good idea here unless she already has a good basic understanding of all this. Better that than a $600 gun and no skills to go with it.

All general statements, including the one I now make, are incorrect. BUT I have instructed on this topic and have some experience at it.

Women and semiautos are not usually friends. Sometimes--but often not. A J or K frame with a nice DA is hard to beat, but make sure the strength is there and the load is one that can be tolerated.

Semiautos can work; the KISS principle is better. As mentioned, there are complexity and strength issues. Simple guns that come to mind are Kahr, Glock, and DAO Rugers (P95?).

Storage and safety are critical with a child around. Theoretical protection from goblins is of small comfort if a child is hurt or killed to get it. A quick-open combo type safe would be good. One of the advantages of a semi-auto would be the ability to keep it completely empty and the mag separate or on the person until wanted as well.

A very tricky issue and one deserving of a lot more thought than just 'which bullet launcher to buy'. It could be that the best decision would be NO gun--it's that big a deal.

CWL
January 25, 2003, 06:25 AM
I would suggest a HK P7M8 for ultimate safety because of the 13-14lb squeeze-cocker safety. Few kids or BGs will be able to figure it out unless they are familiar with it. Only problem is the price... But if you want the best...

If considering a Beretta, please look at the more compact models. The 92fs is a big pistol. many US military men have problems with the size of the grip, myself included. Not a good thing to try & retain if sweaty & nervous.

I also like the idea of a revolver. No safety, but personally, any kid that wants to can figure out how to flick the safety off a gun. Securely locked gun, or well-trained kids are better than a safety.

mainmech48
January 25, 2003, 06:41 AM
IMO, the biggest "plus" in favor of revolvers for anyone, male or female, who's just learning to shoot is their ability to use very mild "mid-range" target loads without modification.

This allows the novice to "work their way up" to full-power defensive loads in stages, as their skill levels and confidence increase. It's been my experience that the basics of proper trigger control, sight picture, etc., are more easily acquired for many people without the added distractions of sharp recoil and very loud report.

Positive reinforcement is crucial in building a positive attitude toward learning a new skill set. Reactive targets such as a falling plate or "swinger" where the feedback is both visible and audible will help immensely by rewarding the beginner with "instant gratification" for performing correctly.

A .357 revolver, with its ability to allow the shooter to progress at their own pace through perhaps the broadest power range available in one handgun, make it a great "1st gun".

Gary G23
January 25, 2003, 07:21 AM
Thanks for such DIVERSE responses. It gives me a lot to think about. I personally agree with Mastrogiacomo on the revolver issue but I will let my daughter decide. The decision on how to keep a gun accessible to an adult but inaccessible to a child is a hard one to make. I'll definitely give it much thought. I have been robbed at gunpoint before and am well aware that the bad guys never give you a two minute warning though.

Ala Dan
January 25, 2003, 08:04 AM
My vote would have to be for the Beretta 9m/m
92fs Centurion model.

Best Wishes,
Ala Dan, N.R.A. Life Member

jrpeterman
January 25, 2003, 08:09 AM
Just a suggestion. Have her try a used S & W 669/469/6906,etc. 12 rds.+1 of 9mm, manual safety, and magazine release safety. Lots of police trade ins, etc. available.

jc2
January 25, 2003, 10:14 AM
When my daughter finally left home, I gave her the choice to pick which weapon SHE wanted. She chose a square-butted, two-inch, pre-Model 10. She liked it, she could shoot it well (very well), and she was comfortable with it.

She had her choice of (and had shot) several automatics including 1911s (full-size and Commanders), Berettas (92 & 96), a really nice Browning HP, a S&W 3914 and several other revolvers (J, L and N frames).

FWIW, the only other weapon she even considered was the 3914, but she said she liked revolvers better. So she went off to Austin with my favourite K-frame and speedloaders.

The moral of the story is: don't write-off revolvers, and let her choose. (Have you even asked her and her husband if they want weapon?)

Pico
January 25, 2003, 10:45 AM
I refer semi-autos but in some cases a revolver makes more sense. I have chosen one for my wife since she can't rack a SA slide very well. A hammerless snub nose Smith would make for a very dependable lady's weapon.

I think it's time to visit the gun store or show and put many types of handguns in her hand and see what clicks. If possible, take the best choice list to the range and rent them all for her to try. If a renting range isn't handy, go with the top choice on the list.

Pico

Mastrogiacomo
January 25, 2003, 11:11 AM
I have to laugh at some of this "ladies choice" revolvers, particularly the snub nose which you can't hit the side of the barn with if they don't kill your hands in the process trying to fire one. If it's really the ladies choice to use a revolver, which I discourage as they're only for close range, I urge her to fire one that's she's considering at the range or gun club. That may change her tune quick. I wish I had done this because believe me, I'd never have wasted my money on my snub nose revolver and just bought a third Beretta compact. If she really wants a gun, have her look into some of these smaller safes that can keep near her bed side. Some allow very quick access and even have devices that will alert her if one of her children has been fooling with the combination lock in an effort to look inside. Safety first, last and every minute of the day with children in the house...:)

jc2
January 25, 2003, 12:35 PM
I have to laugh at some of this "ladies choice" revolvers, particularly the snub nose which you can't hit the side of the barn with if they don't kill your hands in the process trying to fire one.
You've obviously never seen my daughter shoot (and her two-inch snub at that)! The only way you'd be laughing would be if you could laugh at yourself.

I would mention Paxton Quigley, who I'm pretty sure knows more about women and shooting than you do, leans strongly toward the revolver.

The bottom line is you should let the her chose for herself and not try to pontificate based on your experience and prejudices.

BTW, based on what you posted "you can't hit the side of the barn with if they don't kill your hands in the process trying to fire one"), do you have any idea of what I'm describing when I said a "square-butted, two-inch, pre-Model 10?"

Gary G23
January 25, 2003, 01:20 PM
To answer jc2's question yes I did ask them if they wanted a gun in the house. That is not a decision I would want to force my daughter into.

Mastrogiacomo
January 25, 2003, 01:22 PM
I never claimed to be an expert in revolvers and if you're daughter is able to hit the target with a snub nose, power to her. She's an exception. My revolver was so painful to fire I couldn't finish the ammo box with it and had to replace the grip to something rubber and larger. I still hate it, just as I resent it when men all jump on the revolver band wagon. Pistols are simply more accurate with less practice and more confortable to shoot. I've handled revolvers and pistols at the range so I know what a revolver feels like compared to pistols. The recoil for pistols is better too. I think if read my post I said if it is really her choice for the revolver, I recommend she fire the model she's considering buying so she doesn't waste her money with a revolver the way I did.

Sprout
January 25, 2003, 03:19 PM
I think everybody is right :D Some women like pistols better; some women don't. Just like men. I love shooting revolvers; my twin brother doesn't, although he is a far better pistol shot than I am. Different strokes, and all that.

That said, my personal experience is that the new shooters I've taken to the range have almost universally preferred pistols. Go figure, more timme on he wheelgun for me :D

Shane
January 25, 2003, 03:45 PM
I never claimed to be an expert in revolvers and if you're daughter is able to hit the target with a snub nose, power to her. She's an exception. My revolver was so painful to fire I couldn't finish the ammo box with it and had to replace the grip to something rubber and larger. I still hate it, just as I resent it when men all jump on the revolver band wagon. Pistols are simply more accurate with less practice and more confortable to shoot. I've handled revolvers and pistols at the range so I know what a revolver feels like compared to pistols. The recoil for pistols is better too. I think if read my post I said if it is really her choice for the revolver, I recommend she fire the model she's considering buying so she doesn't waste her money with a revolver the way I did.

Just out of curiousity, what snub nose revolver do you own?

I have one snub nosed revolver, a Ruger SP 101, and recoil is VERY mild even with .38 spl +P ammo. The rubber grips I'm sure help absorb recoil. Accuracy is very good for such a small gun--I routinely can hit beer cans as far as 18 yards with the SP 101. I think the gun has to fit the user for optimum performance.


Revolvers fit ME much better than semi-autos. I can shoot a typical revolver with much greater accuracy and more comfortably (less felt recoil) than a typical semi-auto. But, everyone out there is different and probably at least half of the users will end up shooting better with semiautos. Whatever works for the user, there is no right answer IMO. The key, IMO, is to try both out and determine which works best for you.

Kruzr
January 25, 2003, 05:06 PM
Take a look at the Ruger P95. Its light, simple to maintain and very reliable. Its not a target gun but it does just fine as a defensive pistol. There are models with a manual safety or a decocker.

Mastrogiacomo
January 25, 2003, 07:35 PM
I use, or rather I should say I DON'T use a S&W Model 442. I hate the gun and can't sell it as I probably wouldn't get anything for it. I bought it largely because of security work which I have been looking for (armed) require certain firearms for different assignments: the .38, 9mm, .40 or .45. I hope I find a job that does require it because it's a worthless gun as it stands. This isn't to say all revolvers suck, I'm sure if I bought a larger barrel gun I probably would have had a more pleasant shooting experience. Clearly, if the woman in question for this thread chooses a revolver, my arguement is only that she shoot it first to ensure she makes the right choice. Recoil can be a bitch with snub noses and I'd hate for anyone to buy something only off the advice of people on the Internet without having actually fired the gun.:)

Mark IV Series 80
January 25, 2003, 09:10 PM
I never claimed to be an expert in revolvers and if you're daughter is able to hit the target with a snub nose, power to her. She's an exception. My revolver was so painful to fire I couldn't finish the ammo box with it and had to replace the grip to something rubber and larger. I still hate it, just as I resent it when men all jump on the revolver band wagon. Pistols are simply more accurate with less practice and more confortable to shoot. I've handled revolvers and pistols at the range so I know what a revolver feels like compared to pistols. The recoil for pistols is better too. I think if read my post I said if it is really her choice for the revolver, I recommend she fire the model she's considering buying so she doesn't waste her money with a revolver the way I did.Hello Mastrogiacomo,

Unfortunately, you picked the wrong revolver as your first gun.

I have the Model 638...... the same size and weight as your Model 442. These Airweight S&W's aren't fun to shoot all day at the range, they're made for concealed carry....... when you can't carry anything larger or heavier.

If you had chosen a steel, medium-frame revolver with a 6, 4, 3, or 2 inch barrel, perhaps your opinions about revolvers would be different.

One nice thing about a revolver...... you can change the grips to fit many different hands.

As far as accuracy goes, unless you get into expensive, custom semi-autos, the modern, double-action S&W or Ruger will generally have a higher degree of accuracy out-of-the-box....... I have a Colt Combat Commander that I can shoot pretty well: 1.25 inch groups at 7-10 yards. My S&W Model 66 can shoot that kind of group at 25 yards.

I think that if someone is willing to learn a semi-auto and practice at the range with it, at least twice a month, then a semi-auto is a good way to go.

Many police officers don't practice that often, and I read about negligent discharges by police with their semi-autos.

Mastrogiacomo
January 25, 2003, 11:21 PM
Just curious, I changed the grip on mine to a larger Houge rubber grip. The small grip it came with was hard plastic, painful and too small for me to handle well. Did you do anything to your 638 to make it more comfortable to shoot? What was your reason behind your choice?

JohnKSa
January 25, 2003, 11:46 PM
I have to laugh at some of this "ladies choice" revolvers
Mastrogiacomo,

I tend to agree. Even the "experts" generally admit that snubbies aren't usually easy to shoot. Yet, we often see them prescribed as the perfect gun for an inexperienced shooter, simply because the shooter happens to be female.

My wife's experiences mirror yours.

The bottom line is you should let the her chose for herself and not try to pontificate based on your experience and prejudices.
jc2,

Uhhh... you mean as opposed to pontificating based on your own prejudices and the experience of your daughter?

Since when is posting one's opinion pontificating? And since when does someone have to establish that they are an expert before their experiences are worth listening to?

Blackhawk
January 25, 2003, 11:56 PM
Mastrogiacomo, you're alright! :D

Mark IV Series 80
January 26, 2003, 12:18 AM
Just curious, I changed the grip on mine to a larger Houge rubber grip. The small grip it came with was hard plastic, painful and too small for me to handle well. Did you do anything to your 638 to make it more comfortable to shoot? What was your reason behind your choice?Hi Mastrogiacomo,

With some defensive rounds, these Airweights can be punishing to shoot..... If you want some non-painful practice, try shooting some 148 grain wadcutters...... You can even use these wadcutters for defense.

The M638 came from the factory with rubber (Uncle Mike's) grips.
I changed them for smooth, wooden, exposed backstrap "boot grips".

These grips don't make the gun more comfortable to shoot......They do make it a better concealment piece....... covering garments tend to "grab" on a rubber or checkered grip, giving away the fact that you are armed.......

The M638 can be carried much more easily than a heavier, larger gun....... which means I'm more likely to have it with me.

Dienekes
January 26, 2003, 01:09 AM
Mastrogiacomo has a point( perhaps Freudian) about taking advice from the internet. Pretty hard to say if it's Leonardo DeCaprio or Sean Connery on the other end hitting the send button.

Perhaps the best move is to shut down the computer and let the lady take an NRA class where at least the 'instructor' has credentials and his advice can be evaluated...

Mark IV Series 80
January 26, 2003, 02:02 AM
Excellent advice, Dienekes.

I think that everyone should take an NRA Handgun Safety class before buying their first handgun.

I took the class some years ago..... it was an eight-hour class taught at an outdoor range.
Several of the students had never fired a handgun before taking this class.
The 3 instructors were NRA certified.
Safety was the number one topic. They got into the technical (what makes a gun work), the legal aspects, firing the guns at the range, and cleaning the guns afterward.

The time and the money for this class was well spent.
The instructors provided our lunch, the guns and the ammunition.

The guns? They brought along a dozen Smith & Wesson 4-inch police trade-in revolvers.

DAL
January 26, 2003, 11:29 AM
but I absolutely love my S&W 642, which is the stainless version (more or less) of the 442. It is so concealable that I am rarely without it, and it is also quite accurate. I'm sorry yours didn't work out for you, but I wouldn't trade mine for anything (that's a bit of an exaggeration, but you know what I mean). That revolver probably just isn't for you, Mastrogiacomo.
DAL

Mastrogiacomo
January 26, 2003, 11:47 AM
I agree with you DAL but, this wasn't a buy for personal protection as it was for job purposes. I'm currently going for an orientation with a security firm Monday that has armed guard positions. For some armed positions, guards aren't permitted to carry a pistol. Some companies prefers that the guards already own a variety of calibers so they can be considered for whatever assignments comes up. I made it clear to them when I applied that I had not only own the gun permit, but 9mms and a .38 too. This just tells them that there won't be a delay in me starting a position because I don't have the required firearm. On a side note, I imagine the 442 would make a great backup choice and I'd like to try and get used to it especially as it cost me to buy it in the first place. I'm sure there are better revolvers for home defense, but that wasn't the reason for the purchase of mine. Give me a Beretta any day...:)

seeker_two
January 26, 2003, 12:05 PM
Mastrogiacomo:

Since you're interested in a snubby, but don't like the way the S&W handles, you may like Ruger's SP-101. It weighs a bit more, but it's easier to shoot. And the factory grips seem to take away a lot of recoil. I'd suggest a .357 version so you'll have the longer ejection rod to work with.

As for the lady in question, a good K- or L-frame sized revolver in .38spl would probably be ideal, but it's best to let the lady try out several types to find what she likes. And I especially like the idea of her taking a shooting class. Some classes are set up esp. for women & run by women to create a comfortable learning environment. Pay for one for her as an early Christmas/Birthday/Easter/Presidents' Day gift. And encorage her to practice--even if you have to reload ammo for her! :D

Good luck!

PCRCCW
January 26, 2003, 12:32 PM
Take her to a shop and let her play....get a small list of her favorites and then find them to shoot, borrow, beg, rent etc.
She may like the feel of a certain gun and hate the way it shoots/feels in action. Its the only way she will get the gun she likes and will want to shoot enough to become proficient with.
shoot well

cqWpa
February 3, 2008, 11:12 PM
I agree with taking her to the store and letting her handle a few different models. Personally, I think a revolver is great for someone who doesn't shoot regularly. No slides to pull and safeties to remember under stress. I had a Bersa 380 that 'spoke' to my girlfriend. Took her out shooting a few times, worked on her handling skills and familiarity and now, that's her handgun of choice for ccw and home defense. If it's for defense, try to take that stress factor into account.

Rotorflyr
February 4, 2008, 07:25 AM
Gary G,
May have missed it, but you didn't mention how much experience (if any) your daughter has with firearms, makes it tougher to recommend a firearm and remember no one gun fit's (or is liked) by everyone.
Your best bet is to take her to a shop, let her handle as many as she can, even better would be if you had a local range with a good selection of rentals available (but a lot of people don't have that option) and then let her decide which one works best for her (no matter the design and caliber)

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I did see the HK P7 mentioned, and while it is true the M8 could be considered pricey, the PSP version can be had for a fair amount less. Some differences between the two versions, but essentially the same gun.

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Also, is this gun intended to be carried or for home protection? If it's for the house, a shotgun or other long gun might be a better option, as would getting a dog (big or otherwise) they make good early warning systems!

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Mastrogiacomo,
While your experience with revolvers hasn't been positive, again not everyone is the same and there are lot's of women who shoot revolvers (including snubbies) very, very well.
One lady (in her 50's) that was in my CCW class used one for the shooting portion, wasn't a snubbie (4" Taurus iirc) but she was shooting .357's out of it and did quite well with it, not only was it her first revolver, it was her first gun period.
Also, while you may have small hands and have no trouble racking the slide on an Auto, some people, no matter what their gender can have problems doing it (even with practice) not to mention that not everyone is going to put the time in with an Auto to become proficient with clearing jams, breaking them down for cleaning etc......and for them a revolver could/would make more sense.

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I think one of the biggest mistakes people make with snubbies (talking about those with little/no revolver experience) is they go with the ultralight/airweight version, because they are light and "so comfortable to carry" Unfortunately the light(er) weight makes then less comfortable to shoot (for some) which in turn can make them tougher to shoot well.

Firepower!
February 4, 2008, 09:50 AM
It seems like that your daughter does not have experience with heavy calibers. In that respect, I am assuming she does not even have experience with 9mm. That can cause problem in terms of recoil issue.

I suggest the following, in the order of preference:
First: Walther P22
Second: Makarov

Regards

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