Texans for open carry need to contact their state legislators


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TexasBill
January 26, 2011, 02:17 AM
Before this session of the Texas Legislature began, I wrote my State Senator, Dan Patrick, a conservative, pro-gun Republican, about working for open carry in Texas. Although I am a Democrat, I did vote for Patrick, mostly because of his stance on gun control.

There are a couple of pro-gun bills in the hopper, one that would prohibit employers from preventing employees from storing their guns in their cars while at work, the other to allow CHL holders to carry their handguns on college and university campuses.

However, nothing on open carry or the adoption of laws similar to those in Arizona. If that's too much of a hot button issue, try Vermont.

We have only a short window of opportunity before the Legislature shuts down for another two years, so Texans need to contact their state legislators and urge them to support open carry in the Lone State State.

If you don't know who your state senator and representatives are, you can go to http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us/ and enter your street address, city and ZIP Code and you will get a complete list of your legislators along with their addresses, phone numbers and links to their websites.

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calaverasslim
January 26, 2011, 10:49 AM
While I agree with you and have written to these legislators, Perry has already said he would veto any open carry law passed.

If they did pass this law and sent it to Perry, would the state senate be willing to override his veto? I seriously doubt it.

I think a dead issue this time around

mr.scott
January 26, 2011, 11:12 AM
I am not a fan of open carry.
To many people are irrationally afraid of guns and those people can/could cause you problems.
Also, if something bad were to go down and you were there with a gun on your hip for all to see, you are going to be the 1st target.
I prefer concealed as it gives me an advantage if a hairy situation came up.

Dean1818
January 26, 2011, 11:12 AM
Though Texas is very much pro-gun, I dont think the general populace in Texas is really backing legistlation for OC.

I dont see it coming anytime soon.

I also am just fine with my cc.

speaksoftly
January 26, 2011, 05:16 PM
I am not a fan of open carry.
To many people are irrationally afraid of guns and those people can/could cause you problems.
Also, if something bad were to go down and you were there with a gun on your hip for all to see, you are going to be the 1st target.
I prefer concealed as it gives me an advantage if a hairy situation came up.

Amen

Though Texas is very much pro-gun, I dont think the general populace in Texas is really backing legistlation for OC.

We're not. It's been brought up more than a few times and doesn't get much support...even from Texas's CHL holders such as myself.

1911austin
January 26, 2011, 05:45 PM
I am not a fan of open carry.
To many people are irrationally afraid of guns and those people can/could cause you problems.
Also, if something bad were to go down and you were there with a gun on your hip for all to see, you are going to be the 1st target.
I prefer concealed as it gives me an advantage if a hairy situation came up.

Mr. Scott,

I agree with what you have said but still support open carry. I would personally choose to remain concealed because of the reasons that you mentioned. However, I think open carry should be legal for those law-abiding citizens who choose to do so.

Dean1818
January 26, 2011, 08:19 PM
Mr OP...... Please accept my apology for stating my mind on this topic, but......

Fortunately or unfortunately, the society today is out of sight, out of mind.

There are some that are hysterical when it comes to seeing a gun.

Because:

1) Our media portrays and programs that ANYONE that isnt an LEO, or Military to be the BAD GUY.

Our media is almost ALWAYS taking an anti-gun stance. When was the last time that you heard of a guy that protected his home family making the news.

For example, TIME magazine just ran a front page report and article that gave statistic on the number of CHILDREN and TEENS that were getting shot and killed by firearms.

What it DIDNT say is that gun crimes are down over 15% and that the majority of the CHILDREN and TEENS that are getting killed are gang related,
and in many cases, are illegally owned guns.

Its a HUGE SPIN.

2) Our school system is FULL of teachers teaching negative gun bias

3) In many cases, Men have NOT been the Fathers that the good Lord intended, leaving the family for the latest hot chick, almost always destroying or damaging severely the remaining family......... the single parent, mother reared homes, end up in many cases without the male influence father that would in some cases teach proper gun safety is gone.
(About half of the USA children are brought up in a single parent home.... think about it, if you are a father.... do whatever you can to STAY with your kids)

Its not right, its not fair,..... but it is a reality.

I had someone on this board state to me that "no one is ever offended by my OC" . I wish I could read minds like that. and maybe that person is only in rural areas. I will tell you in the suburbs (think voting public) where I live there IS a huge fear of guns.


Lastly I DO have a fear that the volume of effort of open carry enthusiasts, particulary in cities WILL have an impact on my current ability to CCW.

Maybe the right answer is OC in rural, CCW in urban areas.


I feel that I am able to fully able to excercise my 2A rights as it is now.


Sorry OP, for being one of the ones to not agree, but I do believe that there are MANY winnable battles out there. As stated before Perry has already said he would veto any such legislation.

txgunsuscg
January 26, 2011, 08:25 PM
One advantage that people seem to miss in having open carry (even if you disagree with the tactics side of it) is that it would eliminate the possibility of you losing your CHL over an inadvertent revelation of your weapon. Maybe it's changed since I went through, but our instructor told us we risked losing our CHL if, for example, we were carrying under a jacket, reached up for a can on a shelf, and revealed our belt holster and gun. In VA where I am stationed, there are plenty of gun laws that I dislike, but at least I'm not worried about losing my ability to carry a weapon because a gust of wind blew my jacket/vest/shirt open. If that happens here, I simply go from concealed to open carry until I get my concealment back in place.

xcgates
January 26, 2011, 09:00 PM
I am going for my concealed permit, and for the most part don't see myself open carrying. I do however support giving people the option.

And I don't want to worry about accidental exposure (not sure how it works in TX) when transitioning, especially as I tend to play contortionist to get in/out of my riding suit (M/C).

I will support movements for open carry.

Deltaboy
January 26, 2011, 09:33 PM
Thanks to the Nutt who shot the US REP in AZ Open carry is DOA in Austin this time around. If we can stop parking lot bans and the Hospital and College bans we will have done well.

TexasBill
January 27, 2011, 12:20 AM
Ultimately, what I would like to see is Texas with laws similar to Vermont, Alaska and Arizona where the state does not regulate the carrying of weapons by law-abiding citizens except under certain circumstances (courtrooms, while consuming alcoholic beverages, etc.).

You wouldn't open carry? Okay, that's your decision and it's fine. Why are you making the decision for me? Frankly, it is more comfortable for me to carry my sidearm in a holster on a belt. That doesn't mean I want to swagger down Main Street like some dimestore cowboy but I open carry at home and I would rather not have to "dress up" to run down to the grocery store for milk.

The public will never have a chance to become accustomed to seeing an armed citizen until they can see an armed citizen. People in other states have survived the experience; are they made of sterner stuff than we are? What's so different about Texas other than we were about the only state in the Union that absolutely forbade a citizen to carry any pistol, revolver, knife, dirk, dagger, etc. for more than 100 years? Even in New York, one could theoretically get a permit. I think it's about time the State of Texas got over the Reconstruction and Jim Crow laws.

The reasons some of you cite for being opposed to open carry sound like the fear of censure if it was discovered you were carrying a gun at all. Are you really that afraid of the media? The same media that almost no one trusts anyway?

I would also like to see Texas's CHL process overhauled. It takes far too long to get the Texas license and the process is rather intrusive. The state can issue a drivers' license in 4-6 weeks; there's no reason a CHL should take any longer. Currently, the Texas Dept. of Public Safety can take up to nine months to say "yes" or "no."

We had the nut in Tucson, before that, we had the nut at Ft. Hood. Does anyone on this forum think that's a good reason for enacting legislation? As always, on the day Mr Loughner decided to finally lose the rest of his marbles, thirty million or more gun owners did not.

MudPuppy
January 27, 2011, 12:34 AM
As a recent transplant from Texas up to hippie Seattle, I got to say, it's amazing how restrictive your rights on carrying a handgun are.

We have OC in Washington and guess what? All those things you point out as potential problems just don't happen. When I got my license, I went to the PD station, got fingerprinted and background check, paid my fifty bucks and got my license I think about a month later.

I have a hard time distinguishing between pro-gun and anti-gunners sometimes. I remember similar points being brought up when there was debate on CCW in Texas. And I remember Ann Richards veto'ed that. If Perry veto's a pro-self defense measure passed by the legislature, he could just as easily be veto'ed by the voters just like she was.

I think the more we hide 'em, the more people believe they're not there anyway, so why not just ban 'em. I don't mind people seeing well dressed executive just normally carrying OC. It's not porn, i'm not ashamed--it's on my hip.

(And I hope at least everyone on this board knows what happened in Arizona had zip to do with OC or CCW laws--that could have happened in Texas, Washing, or California just as easily.)

Geckgo
January 27, 2011, 01:02 AM
OC is 100% legal in LA, though most residents and even LEOs don't know it because nobody does it. I Imagine, that even if passed, it would be the same in TX.

Dean1818
January 27, 2011, 02:23 AM
A couple of things:

1) In Texas an inadvertant display of a conceal carry (i.e. wind blowing the shirt up) is not an offense. Brandishing (unholstering) a weapon in a public setting, is illegal unless used in defense of ones self, property, or another party

2) My personal experience on getting my CCL back in Texas, after I submitted paperwork was 6 weeks.


If I offended anyone with my opinions, please accept my apology.

I have seen some OC opinions where it was an "in-your-face" attitude
about the topic, and also how and where they would OC. Some of these folks
just didnt seem to care what others (think voting populace) thought on the subject. (If I grouped the OP in with that group incorrectly, please accept my apology)

I don't support that attitude. I believe that we should be VERY conscious of
how we handle ourselves as the gun owning populace.

Gun owners around the USA cheered the recent supreme cout ruling about guns in Chicago. I was happy....... however. Even though the constitution
clearly states the rights to bear arms, our highest court voted by the slimmest margin 5-4.

Its an end-zone catch at best.

The closeness of the vote alarms me. If we lose 1 conservative judge in the next 2 years I believe the court will be restocked with another anti-gunner. Not good for gun owners.

Its indicative of the times we are in. Pining away for times earlier in our history and pretending that things are the same way they were in the 50's or 60's is not the best strategy. (again in my humble opinion)

The immediate hysteria following the nutjob in Arizona, also alarmed me about how gun ownership is viewed.

As responsible gun owners, I personally believe that we have to choose our battles, actions, and legislation to support wisely. AND VOTE !

For me, in the city of Dallas (suburb) OC would put more of a dent in what the voting public felt about guns. That is un-neccessary.

If people started seeing visable guns and became more uneasy, I believe the current (acceptable to me, and fully meets 2A freedoms) CCW rules may come in to question as well.

In the country, have at it. Call me an anti if you want....we all have an opinion, but I dont support OC in the bigger cities. I believe that its "bad for business" in the long run.

In my humble opinion, maybe not even worth .02 cents......

TexasBill
January 27, 2011, 09:59 AM
One thing that has been overlooked in all the media mess is that one of the people who helped take Loughner down was a legally armed civilian. He did not display his weapon because he did not believe it was necessary.

The other problem we face is the media is making too much of a supposed "failure" of the system we have in place to prevent people like Loughner from obtaining a firearm when the real problem was the failure of various institutions and agencies to get a clearly disturbed person into the mental health system. As long as we continue to have the current cavalier attitude toward mental illness and treatment, we will continue to have loose cannons roaming the streets. Of course, new (though ineffective) gun control laws are much cheaper to enact than allocating resources to our healthcare system. The fact we will spend a huge amount of money prosecuting Loughner and then another big wad of money either incarcerating or executing him, plus the huge medical bills that will have to be paid for Rep. Giffords' treatment, care and rehabilitation, as well as treatment for the others injured doesn't factor into the equation. All because nobody who had a run-in with Loughner would take the initiative to have him even examined by a mental health professional. So don't even begin to imagine the tragedy in Tucson can be laid on current gun laws.

Last August, there was a bit of controversy in Royal Oak, Michigan, because open carry was allowed (in conformance with state law) at the Arts, Beats and Eats Festival. The topic received a fair amount of media attention, but afterwards, as Royal Oak Police Chief Christopher Janke said, it was a "non-issue." Nothing happened.

We applauded the efforts of those brave souls who open-carried in California and Starbucks, which served them. Do we really want to say Texans are more sensitive or sissified than Californians?

Rick Perry says he will veto any legislation permitting open carry. If the legislation is framed properly, Slick Rick will fall all over himself to sign it. One simply introduces a bill which restores Texans' right to carry weapons, openly or concealed, without prior government approval, a right that was abrogated more than a century ago in the wake of the Civil War. Governor Perry, who made news by killing a coyote with his own handgun, would have a great deal of difficulty opposing a restoration of rights, especially when those rights have been affirmed by the Supreme Court. His political opponents would have a field day with that.

I don't want anyone to think an opposing position offends me. Rational discussion is the lifeblood of this forum. Besides, as a liberal Democrat on this forum, I have developed a rather thick skin. However, I do have a basis for my position and I have invested a decent amount of time considering it.

AXI
January 31, 2011, 06:23 PM
Mr OP...... Please accept my apology for stating my mind on this topic, but......

Fortunately or unfortunately, the society today is out of sight, out of mind.

There are some that are hysterical when it comes to seeing a gun.

Because:

1) Our media portrays and programs that ANYONE that isnt an LEO, or Military to be the BAD GUY.

Our media is almost ALWAYS taking an anti-gun stance. When was the last time that you heard of a guy that protected his home family making the news.

For example, TIME magazine just ran a front page report and article that gave statistic on the number of CHILDREN and TEENS that were getting shot and killed by firearms.

What it DIDNT say is that gun crimes are down over 15% and that the majority of the CHILDREN and TEENS that are getting killed are gang related,
and in many cases, are illegally owned guns.

Its a HUGE SPIN.

2) Our school system is FULL of teachers teaching negative gun bias

3) In many cases, Men have NOT been the Fathers that the good Lord intended, leaving the family for the latest hot chick, almost always destroying or damaging severely the remaining family......... the single parent, mother reared homes, end up in many cases without the male influence father that would in some cases teach proper gun safety is gone.
(About half of the USA children are brought up in a single parent home.... think about it, if you are a father.... do whatever you can to STAY with your kids)

Its not right, its not fair,..... but it is a reality.

I had someone on this board state to me that "no one is ever offended by my OC" . I wish I could read minds like that. and maybe that person is only in rural areas. I will tell you in the suburbs (think voting public) where I live there IS a huge fear of guns.


Lastly I DO have a fear that the volume of effort of open carry enthusiasts, particulary in cities WILL have an impact on my current ability to CCW.

Maybe the right answer is OC in rural, CCW in urban areas.


I feel that I am able to fully able to excercise my 2A rights as it is now.


Sorry OP, for being one of the ones to not agree, but I do believe that there are MANY winnable battles out there. As stated before Perry has already said he would veto any such legislation.
You make a good point, it is stimulus which causes the fear to begin with. However, I do believe that this fear is in fact a fear of the unknown.

Think of Allegory of the Cave by Plato, there is lots that people can make up in their head about guns, but one thing that the media does not have on its side is reality; if they see what it was they were once afraid of in real context, they will:

1. Be upset at the misrepresentations
2. No longer fear

Dean1818
January 31, 2011, 09:18 PM
Unfortunately, perceptions become reality (right or wrong) to the people that hold them

Our best efforts can be to take the non-shooting public to the range or hunting.

Flintknapper
January 31, 2011, 09:49 PM
OC in Texas is absolutely a dead issue this session.

IF you contact your legislators, do so in a preparatory way for the NEXT session 2 years from now.

It would be a complete waste of time to try and introduce anything...this late in the game.

Even if someone sponsored a bill...it would never see the light of day. There is too much already on the agenda.

We'll be lucky to get campus carry, and luckier still... if the "neutered" Parking Lot bill passes.

Bernie Lomax
January 31, 2011, 10:49 PM
However, nothing on open carry or the adoption of laws similar to those in Arizona.

It is my understanding that Texas allows open carry of long guns, even though no one ever does it, at least in urban areas. Here's what I'd do: get together and organize with some OC activists on opencarry.com and start OCing long guns in Houston, Dallas, Austin, etc. After a little of that, let the legislature know that if you get OC of handguns you'll make the pain stop.

If that's too much of a hot button issue, try Vermont.

You'd be much better off with Arizona-style laws than Vermont style laws. Both states require no permit to OC or CC, but Arizona still issues a permit for purposes of reciprocity. Vermont doesn't and never has.

hso
February 2, 2011, 09:42 AM
Folks,

The thread is for folks who want to have OC in TX, not a debate on whether OC is a good idea or not.

TexasBill
February 2, 2011, 04:09 PM
There was supposed to be an open carry law introduced in this session of the legislature, but I can't find anything in the hopper that looks like one.

I've seen lots of arguments on one side and the other. I've seen lots of proposals for changing the Penal Code. If we must wait until the next session, perhaps it's time to push for a change to the Texas Constitution.

Article 1 (Bill of Rights), Section 23 of the Texas Constitution adopted on February 15, 1876, reads: "RIGHT TO KEEP AND BEAR ARMS. Every citizen shall have the right to keep and bear arms in the lawful defense of himself or the State; but the Legislature shall have power, by law, to regulate the wearing of arms, with a view to prevent crime."

By the time the Constitution was ratified, the Legislature had already gutted article 23 with the Act of April 12, 1871, which essentially prohibited the bearing of arms. The act was upheld by the Texas Supreme Court in English v. State in 1872 where the court said: "1. The act of April 12, 1871, regulating and in certain cases prohibiting the carrying of pistols, dirks, and certain other deadly weapons, is not repugnant to the second amendment to the constitution of the United States, which provides that "a well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed," nor is the act in violation of the thirteenth section of the first article of the constitution of this state, which provides that "every person shall have the right to keep and bear arms in the lawful defense of himself or the state, under such regulations as the legislature may prescribe." 2. The "arms" referred to in the second amendment to the United States constitution are the arms of a militiaman or soldier, and they do not comprise dirks, bowie knives, etc., regulated by the legislature in the act of April 12, 1871. 3. The powers of government are intended to operate upon the civil conduct of the citizen; and whatever conduct offends against public morals or public decency comes within the range of legislative authority." (Does this line of reasoning sound familiar to anyone?)

The Texas Supreme Court, in rendering its opinion, overlooked or ignored Texas' own, and at that time, recent, history in saying, "The "arms" referred to in the second amendment to the United States constitution are the arms of a militiaman or soldier, and they do not comprise dirks, bowie knives, etc., regulated by the legislature in the act of April 12, 1871."

Bowie knives? As in Jim Bowie, one of the heroes of the Alamo? As in Jim Bowie, a soldier in the Texas militia?

The Texas Supreme Court had basically adopted one of the anti-gun crowds favorite tactics: defining the militia as an organized, uniformed body of men under regular government control, like the Texas National Guard. The truth is the Texas militia didn't look anything like that. My cousin spent years working in the Texas State Archives; I've never seen any descriptions of the Texas militia as being anything like the National Guard. I am sure cutlery of all descriptions could be found in the kits of Texas militiamen and guns would consist of pretty much anything that would fire a bullet.

The Act of April 12, 1871 was enacted during the Reconstruction, not one of the brighter periods of American, or Texan, history. Far from being a measure with "a view to prevent crime," it was one of the "Jim Crow" laws intended to disarm recently freed slaves. As such, it should have been repealed years ago but remained essentially unaltered for 124 years - until 1995 when the first concealed-carry legislation was passed. Instead of repeal, lawmakers have been reluctant to correct the error of their predecessors and, even when the legislature does do something, like passing the legislation that allowed unlicensed concealed carry in vehicles, other politicians, like the District Attorney of Harris County, defied the new legislation and instructed law enforcement agencies to continue enforcing the old law, even though it would now be impossible to get a conviction under that law.

Instead of going through all sorts of gyrations about open carry, concealed carry, printing, etc., I think we need to make one simple change: one that actually simplifies the Texas Constitution. Amend Article 1, Section 23 to read: "RIGHT TO KEEP AND BEAR ARMS. Every citizen shall have the right to keep and bear arms in the lawful defense of himself or the State."

Wyoming, which already allows open carry and licenses concealed carry, is considering legislation that would allow the state to join Alaska, Arizona and Vermont as a Constitutional carry state. If passed, citizens of Wyoming would be able to carry, openly or concealed, without prior government permission.

Forget about "fixing" Chapter 46 of the Texas Penal Code. Change the law, top to bottom, to define those circumstances in which prohibiting carry is tied to the actual commission of an offense rather than simply making the carry an offense in and of itself.

Before you dismiss open carry out of hand, consider this: What if Texas had permitted open carry with a license and continued to prohibit concealed carry under almost all circumstances? What if, instead of printing, you had to worry about concealing any part of the gun, even accidentally? Would you still get the license? Would you dismiss those who wanted concealed carry?

In the end, it's not about open carry or concealed carry: it's about carry; the Right to Keep and Bear Arms without government permission. The "right of the people" that predated not only the Texas Constitution but the U.S. Constitution.

BigMustard
February 2, 2011, 05:47 PM
I agree that Texas should allow open carry. Whether or not you choose to OC or CC that is up to you. But having the option would be appreciated.

To many people are irrationally afraid of guns and those people can/could cause you problems.

I also agree that people are irrationally afraid of guns. But that is their own problem and not yours. Some people think all people with tattoos are the devil, but I don't wear a sweater everywhere.

Also, my 8-3/8'' Raging Bull is a little hard to conceal ;)

I honestly don't think it will happen anytime soon. There are too many chaotic issues that are far more important than this and I would like them to take priority.

Like the border.

TexasBill
February 2, 2011, 08:50 PM
It won't ever happen if we don't make the effort to make it happen. For more than 120 years, legislators generally did nothing about a Jim Crow law that was the most oppressive in the nation and, when they did make an effort, governors vetoed it.

What do we have right now? A CHL law that still makes license holders paranoid. A CHL process that gives the state 26 weeks to 36 weeks to do a background check and issue or deny a license. The background check to become an Austin Police Officer takes a maximum of six weeks and it's a lot more in-depth and detailed. Yes, the wait time could be less but the APD also says it can clear a candidate in as little as a week. In fact, it's quite possible to become a licensed probationary police officer, including completing academy, in less time than we must allow the DPS to process a CHL application. Think about that: it takes less time to be authorized to carry a concealed weapon in every state in the union than it does to be authorized to carry a concealed handgun in Texas.

We can do better than that but not if we waste our efforts in turf wars, petty squabbling and tossing straw men, myths and old wives' tales at each other.

CollinLeon
February 6, 2011, 04:16 AM
If we had open carry here in Texas, it still wouldn't mean that you would see a lot of people carrying... Prior to having the CHL program, we allowed open carry of rifles and shotguns and very few people took advantage of it... I was living in an apartment up in Dallas back then while working contract on a 6 month project. The area was not exactly the best of places -- gang marking on all the fences and such -- but it was cheap and since it was just a place to sleep for a couple of hours each night, I didn't care. Anyway, back then I carried a 12-gauge pistol grip shotgun with me most places... If I had to go out to my truck, I had it in my hand... If I had to go to the mailbox, I had it in my hand... I had a couple of people ask me about it and I just said that since it was legal in Texas, I did it... Some cops were at the apartment for some sort of incident one morning when I was walking out to get in my car to go to work and they asked me why I was carrying it... I told them the same thing... They ran a quick check on the serial number to ensure that it wasn't stolen and then gave me the shotgun back and I went on my way... For some reason though, I *never* had any problems with the gangs around there...

"Peace through superior firepower..."

<soapbox>

I got my CHL just for the convenience of it though... I firmly believe that the ONLY "license" that anyone needs to carry ANY firearm is the 2nd Amendment. The Founding Fathers did not provide any exceptions... In fact, they said that the right to bear arms SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED... Pretty plain... No exceptions for places that serve alcoholic beverages, polling places, schools, courts of law, or whether a person is mentally unstable or even a former felon... Either you believe that the Founding Fathers knew what they were saying and *meant* it, or you have started sliding down that slippery slope that the leftists have been trying to lead everyone down for so many years... As far as I'm concerned, the 2nd Amendment is an *absolute* right and as such, there are *no* exceptions...

</soapbox>

CollinLeon
February 6, 2011, 04:25 AM
Change the law, top to bottom, to define those circumstances in which prohibiting carry is tied to the actual commission of an offense rather than simply making the carry an offense in and of itself.


I guess that would be a good start at getting rid of the leftist influence in Texas laws, but from a philosophical standpoint, I do not think that there should be a difference in penalty for the commission of a crime that is dependent upon what tool that the perpetrator used at the time. By allowing firearms to be treated that way, we are saying that they are different than other devices that perform the same end result. For example, the penalty for ax murderer should be the same as for someone who uses a knife or a firearm.

TexasBill
February 6, 2011, 05:24 AM
CollinLeon, I agree. Unfortunately, the use of a firearm in commission of a crime is already an aggravating circumstance and a separate charge. It might be possible to get the use of any prohibited weapon (illegal knife, dirk, dagger, bowie knife, club, etc.) treated similarly. However, since ax is not on the list of prohibited weapons, I guess the ax murderer gets off light.

CollinLeon
February 6, 2011, 05:29 AM
Which I personally think is misguided... If anything, the person who kills someone with an ax should be punished more since it is a more vicious means of killing someone than simply shooting them... Regardless, I think that each of the tools should be treated equally... If a person intentionally strangles a person with a feather boa, it should be treated the same as if they intentionally shot the person.

TexasBill... Regarding your tag line... I can understand the "no Glocks", but why "no Kimbers"? I have M1911 series in both Colt and Kimber and they are both nice weapons...

Guillermo
February 6, 2011, 11:10 AM
I am disgusted that gun owners seem to only answer the call to action if they would be affected.

While I would not open carry on the way to the grocery I would if I were hiking.

And even if I will not I, unlike a lot of gun owners, will support others right to do so.

I am starting to pen some letters to my legislators now.

Thanks for pointing out that dead legislation or not, it is time to step up and support open carry.

Hawaiian
February 6, 2011, 12:43 PM
I hope you can get legislation passed for OC in Texas. I believe you should have the right to OC. That said, OC is legal in Oregon, and in the 9 years I have lived here I have never seen anyone OC in public. There are lots of gun owners and CHL holders in Oregon, but very very few choose to OC. Only a few that are trying to make a point and they end up drawing negative attention to themselves. So, making it legal won't do anything to get Joe or Jane average citizen comfortable with OC because most will never see it anyway.

RioShooter
February 6, 2011, 04:13 PM
Perry has already said he would veto any open carry law passed.

I can't find this statement anywhere. As a matter of fact, his spokesperson said he would be open to the idea. See the following link.

http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/05/22/2209564/gun-rights-advocates-pushing-for.html

Flintknapper
February 6, 2011, 05:02 PM
Perry will sign it if the NRA and TSRA are behind it.

Both are neutral on the subject right now....and there is virtually NO chance for OC this session. That doesn't mean the "groundwork" for it and contacting your legislators is not needed though.

Everything that can be done prior to the next session (in two years) should be done....I am all for that. Start talking it up now, let your legislators and lobbyists know how you feel. Also, the TSRA and NRA need to hear from you, or they will NOT move on it. They have no plans to forward it.... of their own volition.


Flint.

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