Ok, I am a convert (to lewis lead remover)


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Peter M. Eick
January 30, 2011, 04:19 PM
For many years I saw the standard mantra of de-leading a revolver with a lewis lead remover. Many many times I have read about them but never got one. I figured that a good stiff brush and then a copper chore boy was good enough. The barrel always looked good to me so I just went along.

Recently, I read RC's and 1911tuners comments and decided what the heck just get one. So I ordered a bunch of them for every caliber and got extra screens.

I tried it on my old diamondback today.

OOOHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!

Wow am I a believer now. It cleaned off so much of the forcing cone and pulled so much fine gunk out of the cylinder I am a changed man. It even pulled lead out of what I thought was a clean barrel. Very fine strips came out. I must have worked on it for an hour because the more I tried, the cleaner it got. After 46,000 odd rounds the lead had really built up. It was just a fine layer that blended in and was not really noticed, My old diamondback barrel actually gleams now.

I am a new believer!

So, the chore boy method is over and in with the lewis lead remover. I wonder why I waited this long to try it?

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=21587/Product/LEWIS_LEAD_REMOVER

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Nomad
January 30, 2011, 06:14 PM
I agree the Lewis is the way to go but for me, I only use it every so often. In between I use Chore Boy and chemicals.

ADKWOODSMAN
January 30, 2011, 06:25 PM
What chemicals are you referring to?
Thanks
ADK

MCgunner
January 30, 2011, 06:28 PM
Interesting. I don't know, scrub my barrels with chore boy and get 'em LOOKING clean and they shoot straight, so maybe I'm not getting it all out, but seems to get enough out. Shooting jacketed ammo now and then don't hurt, I reckon.

BUT, perhaps I need one of these things. :D

gofastman
January 30, 2011, 06:40 PM
I with they made them for .22's

GP100man
January 30, 2011, 10:27 PM
You did`nt get enuff choreboy on the old brush , it has to be enuff to fit tite !!!

& when ya pull it back thru it`ll clean the forcing cone !!

I let mine soak with Ed`s Red for 15min before starting !!

788Ham
January 31, 2011, 12:20 AM
I bought one of these about 20 years ago, I was shooting lead semi-wad cutters in my .44 mag. I thought I was getting the barrel clean also, NOT! The first thing I noticed was the forcing cone, like yourself, I was dumbfounded. Needless to say, I slowed the lead down, still dragged the brass screen tho, then started shooting jacketed bullets period.

Minnesota Wild
January 31, 2011, 12:48 AM
I inherited one of these with a Model 13 .357. It took me a bit to figure out how it worked (putting the jig on the rod when the rod was already in the barrel was not intuitive), but once I did it was incredible. I pulled enough lead out of some of my guns to cast a new bullet. I've started shooting some jacketed rounds at the end of most sessions, which helps a great deal with lead buildup, but that Lewis tool is a keeper for sure.

DBR
January 31, 2011, 01:08 AM
Lead removal by popular mechanical means can be very deceptive. Most methods leave a polished layer in the barrel that looks great but is not gone. Same in shotgun barrels; Looks clean but a Lewis lead remover scrapes out a whole bunch of stuff that didn't look like it was there.

If you really want to see what your bore looks like without fouling, try an Outer's Foul Out. It is the only thing I have tried that will actually clean lead fouling to bare metal.

StrawHat
January 31, 2011, 06:50 AM
The Lewis Lead Remover is about the simplest tool to use to clean the bore.

I have one for about 40 years now and would not be without it.

Of course, developing loads that don't lead is a better option but the LLR is needed during the workup!

Firing jacketed ammo merely irons out the lead and makes it shiny so it looks like it is gone. After you do that, it is harder to remove.

DMZ
January 31, 2011, 09:11 AM
What chemicals are you referring to?
Thanks
ADK
I have successfully used Remington 40X Bore Cleaner for several years. It works fine if you are very patient.

PzGren
February 1, 2011, 12:49 AM
I use them. By the way, why do you think Glock is warning against using lead in their barrels? Shouldn't they amend the instructional booklet by allowing lead bullets when the barrel is cleaned with the lewis lead remover?

Hoppe's used to have a similiar tool long ago.

340PD
February 1, 2011, 10:22 AM
I found it the only way to completely clean the lead out. It was so good at it that I now only use plated bullets. I really got tired of scrubbing lead out of my revolvers. I tried all hardness/load recomendations. Nothing was perfect. The extra cost of plated bullets is worth it to me. I clean a revolver now in five minutes.

MCgunner
February 1, 2011, 10:48 AM
I was dumbfounded. Needless to say, I slowed the lead down, still dragged the brass screen tho, then started shooting jacketed bullets period.

Well, that's an option and calibers like 9x19 sometimes can present problems in that to get the load hot enough to cycle the gun, it's gonna lead a bit. Heavier bullet options can be the answer. Gas checks sure do a good job. I shoot a 165 grain .357" (weighs 165, listed at 158 in the lee catalog) SWC gas check bullet out of a 20" carbine at 1900 fps with no leading. It's as good as shooting jacketed stuff.

With most loads, you're going to get SOME leading if using lead bullets and no gas check, but chore boy seems to work for me. I wrap it tight around a .22 brush to clean 9x19 and 38, around a .38 brush to clean my .45. :D I really don't worry much about it. My loads work fine in my guns and all guns need to be cleaned, after all. I cast and I have a source of free lead, so I'll keep shooting lead for the free bullets.

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