Eibar-built .38 long revolver


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Dr. Fresh
February 4, 2011, 06:27 PM
So I just bought an old revolver and I don't know much about the history of it. It was built in Eibar, Spain in 1924 and it looks a lot like a Police Positive. The difference is, the cylinder release is in front of the cylinder, on the left side of the frame just below the barrel.

Here's a pic:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e353/dntheplaya/DSCN7362.jpg

Does anyone know anything about this revolver? Also, is it safe to fire .38 Special with it?

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Oyeboten
February 4, 2011, 09:18 PM
Good looking old Revolver, and nice condition!


Images of the other side?


Generally, the Spanish renderings of the Colt or S&W designs are considered a little 'iffy' for shooting full power Cartridges in.


.38 Special Mid Range Wadcutters are usually felt to be alright to use...and or any slightly reduced Loadings, using Lead Bullets, would probably be fine...no jacketed or hardball though.

This may be chambered in .38 Colt, rather than .38 Special, also...so you need ot check the Cylinder Bores.


Are the Cylinder Bores stepped? And, if so, are they stepped to the depth of .38 Special?


What is there for Text on the Barrel?


The Cylinder indicing, lacking any positive Notches, relying on the Hand to align the Cylinder at Battery, would be pretty archiac for 1924, even for Spain....even if Colt had used that system some decades previous on their mid frame .38 Colt DA Revolvers.


How did you arrive at that date of manufacture?

Jim K
February 5, 2011, 11:14 PM
Permit me to disagree, Oyeboten. In practice you may be right in that the gun will hold up to standard or light .38 Special loads. But many of those guns were made of cheap cast iron, not steel, and a lot have blown up firing standard loads. I know of a case where a cylinder blew apart while firing blanks, with a piece just missing a bystander.

Quality varied in those Spanish guns. In general the guns whose makers put their names on the guns are of fair quality, though still poor compared to S&W or Colt. But most guns are "no name" or nonsense named, like "THE KING AT ARMS".

That gun looks like a Colt, but is different internally; instead of having a sideplate, it has the trigger guard and the lockwork inserted from the bottom (like a Webley) and pinned and screwed in place. I strongly suggest it not be fired at all, but of course that is up to the owner.

Jim

Dr. Fresh
February 7, 2011, 05:58 PM
The text on the barrel reads ".38 Long" and it reads "Eibar 1924" on the side of the frame. This pic is the only one I have right now, but I'll take more when I get the chance.

The cylinder spins freely to the right but not to the left. When the hammer is cocked it locks the cylinder in place. The previous owner has put a couple hundred rounds through it with no trouble, and judging by the wear and tear, it's safe to say this weapon has been fired many many times. I'll probably just stick to .38 long loads though. I'm sure someone somewhere still makes them.

EDIT: The bores are not stepped but are about the right length for .38 Special.

Oyeboten
February 8, 2011, 01:33 AM
Permit me to disagree, Oyeboten. In practice you may be right in that the gun will hold up to standard or light .38 Special loads. But many of those guns were made of cheap cast iron, not steel, and a lot have blown up firing standard loads. I know of a case where a cylinder blew apart while firing blanks, with a piece just missing a bystander.

Quality varied in those Spanish guns. In general the guns whose makers put their names on the guns are of fair quality, though still poor compared to S&W or Colt. But most guns are "no name" or nonsense named, like "THE KING AT ARMS".

That gun looks like a Colt, but is different internally; instead of having a sideplate, it has the trigger guard and the lockwork inserted from the bottom (like a Webley) and pinned and screwed in place. I strongly suggest it not be fired at all, but of course that is up to the owner.

Jim


I have to defer and agree with you, now that you expanded on the matter a little more.


I am such a naive optimist sometimes!


But indeed, not knowing the kind of Metalurgy it has, not firing at all would be the best and safest bet.


Dry Fire with Snap Caps - one could likely do all one likes of course.


Primed Cases and Wax Bullets, likewise...which might just be pretty fun to do with that Revolver, too, for indoor 'Plinking' with Paper Targets across a Room, and, getting to put it through it's paces with no worries or risk of damage.

Oyeboten
February 8, 2011, 01:40 AM
Hi Dr, Fresh,



If it says ".38 Long", I think you ought to believe it.

I am also thinking that your Revolver may in fact be a lot older than 1924, and, may even have been made with the anticipation that it would only have Black POwder Cartridges of .38 Long Colt put into it.


If this is so, even if a prior owner had got away with shooting off the shelf .38 Special out of it, we have no way of knowing at what point the Metalurgy of the Cylinder may give out or burst.


Now, maybe, Black Powder Loads, using .38 Long Colt Cartridges, might be something to think about.

But, even at that, if it was me, I would make sure no bystanders are located where fragments of burst Cylinder could hit them, if it did blow.

It is a really good looking Revolver.

But, I would say, if you want something about as that, to Shoot with for fun now and then, then, consider an actual Colt or S & W of the 1910s through the 1920s or even 1930s.

Dr. Fresh
March 4, 2011, 08:26 PM
Well, it does have "Eibar 1924" stamped right on the frame.

Anyway, I think I'll have a good gunsmith look it over before I fire it.

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