Legal way to bring .22 from Canada?


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tulsamal
February 5, 2011, 01:12 PM
My son is 12 and about to turn 13. His maternal grandfather is 72 and lives in the Ottawa, Ontario area. He sent me an email telling me that he has a single shot .22 rifle that he has owned since he was a teenager. He was wondering if Franklin would like to have it?

Seems like I've heard about this before. Form 6 and all that stuff. Since we are talking about what will probably turn out to be a $60 rifle, the main "point" is that the rifle is a family heirloom. It wouldn't make any sense to spend a lot of money getting it to Oklahoma. So is there some process that doesn't need a lawyer or cost a mint to do something like this?!

Thanks,

Gregg

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TexasRifleman
February 5, 2011, 01:17 PM
Does it happen to be a rifle that would qualify for C&R status? I believe a C&R FFL can do the importing directly if so for C&R rifles if non military, or I've been told that anyway.

Might make it cheaper. Still has to go the Form 6 route I believe.

http://www.atf.gov/forms/download/atf-f-5330-3a.pdf


Also, has it always been in Canada or did it originally come from the US? If it started out here it can come back easier. I don't mean made here, I mean originally purchased here then later taken to Canada.

rodregier
February 5, 2011, 05:00 PM
I strongly suspect is is going to have to go the Form 6 route.

My understanding is that if an item is permanently exported from the US in commerce, there is no special enhanced status for that specific unit to return to the US later.

Since the original owner won't be returning with it to the US, I doubt there is any special import status in the US deriving from it. Such status allows the original owner to leave the US with a few firearms and later return with them w/o supplemental permits. Registering them with US Customs before departure (you get to keep the paperwork) wildly simplifies such transactions.

Since only select FFL's choose to pay the additional USG fees necessary to import firearms, expect to pay a "larger than domestic transaction" fee to the FFL for their services.

I suspect a Form 6 requires an export permit issued by the origin country (Canada).

Just to complicate matters, there is also the Canadian gov't export considerations. That class of firearm won't need any extraordinary paperwork, but getting even a proforma export permit from Canadian authorities will be complicated if the firearm in question hasn't yet been registered with Canadian authorities as required by extant Canadian law.

tulsamal
February 6, 2011, 01:53 AM
Also, has it always been in Canada or did it originally come from the US? If it started out here it can come back easier. I don't mean made here, I mean originally purchased here then later taken to Canada.

My father-in-law is a Canadian citizen and always has been. He told me he's had the gun since he was a teenager. Odds are it is some American brand but he bought it in Canada and it has been there ever since.

Did he register it? I haven't asked him. He's complained to me before about the intrusive gov't and how stupid the gun registry was. Since it was "just a single shot .22...." my guess is that it's been under a bed for 50 years and nobody ever registered it.

I do have a C&R.

Gregg

TexasRifleman
February 6, 2011, 12:27 PM
My father-in-law is a Canadian citizen and always has been. He told me he's had the gun since he was a teenager

OK. In the fine print it says that if the gun was taken to Canada during a move for example, and that can be proven, then it can come back without being "imported" but that doesn't sound like the case here. Just wondered.

Shadow 7D
February 6, 2011, 06:01 PM
I'd call customs and ask, phrase it as a 'childhood rifle' that has been with family, leave it at that and ask what you need, I know you can bring personal guns back in to the US from over sea, it's a personal import, don't believe a FFL is required (there is no transfer of ownership)

GRIZ22
February 6, 2011, 09:25 PM
I know you can bring personal guns back in to the US from over sea

Yes but that's with proof you tool them out of the US. As you've said call CBP and the inspectors can give you the correct answer.

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