spin cylinder check


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dashootist
February 8, 2011, 01:02 AM
Do you usually pull the hammer slightly back and spin the cylinder after it is closed to ensure it will rotate freely?

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BP44
February 8, 2011, 01:59 AM
When i close the cyl. i rotate to lock though, funny i have never really thought about it 'till now:)

earlthegoat2
February 8, 2011, 02:03 AM
Are you talking about checking for high primers?

Or are you wondering when we are checking out a revolver to buy?

ljnowell
February 8, 2011, 02:30 AM
No I wouldnt. I dont remember off hand what it is, but i was told by an old timer a long time ago that it isnt good for the gun. Something about that little click-click-click sound was something that would wear or some such. Take that with a grain of salt though, as I can do my own work on most semi autos, but I know nothing more than how to take off a sideplate and clean the gunk out of a revolver.

cpirtle
February 8, 2011, 02:36 AM
I dont remember off hand what it is, but i was told by an old timer a long time ago that it isnt good for the gun.

He could have meant the movie version of spinning the cylinder while open then flipping the cylinder closed. Bad for a lot of reasons. As described for this thread I'm not sure why it would be bad other than increasing the wear a little.

I have never done this with a DA revolver but I do it every time during CAS matches while shooting SA's, had a high primer lock me up in the middle of a stage once... only once. We needed a sometimes option ;)

ljnowell
February 8, 2011, 02:41 AM
No, this was specifically that he warned me against, not the flicking shut. Heck, even I knew that one then, and I really didnt know much! Course, I was only about 12.

Sam1911
February 8, 2011, 07:57 AM
I generally don't, but a lot of the better revolver competitors do.

CajunBass
February 8, 2011, 08:54 AM
Nope. I've never even thought about doing it.

451 Detonics
February 8, 2011, 09:00 AM
I have done it every time I have loaded a revolver and even on my Action Pistol revolver, a 686, it has never done any damage...and that gun has had it done so many times I couldn't begin to count them...in 6 digits tho. It is the best way to make sure not only there isn't a high primer but also that there isn't another problem such as powder flakes under the star.

I have also seen folks have an AD doing so...caution is advised.

Using your wrist to flick the cylinder closed however is tough on the gun even tho it looks mall ninja cool in the movies.

MrBorland
February 8, 2011, 09:18 AM
I'm pretty sure the OP's referring to a "check spin", rather than flipping the cylinder closed.

My main CF revolvers are rendered DAO, so I don't (can't) check-spin. I routinely check spin my 10-shot 617 revolver, though. Tight chambers and even a little bit of crud make it likely not all rounds are fully seated, which can affect the DA pull. A check spin gets them all seated properly.

Before doing a check spin at a match, though, I'd be sure to get the SO's approval first. And be sure to keep the muzzle down range.

451 Detonics
February 8, 2011, 09:29 AM
Why can't you spin check your DAO guns? I spin check mine the same as I do my DA/SA revolvers.

ExMachina
February 8, 2011, 09:31 AM
How do you do this exactly? I've tried a few times but can't get it right. The degree to which you need to pull the hammer back seems like a very very narrow window. Too much or too little and "CLUNK",the cylinder locks (which is not a good sound, BTW)

Sam1911
February 8, 2011, 09:31 AM
Why can't you spin check your DAO guns?Gonna be a bit more difficult to do with a bobbed hammer.

451 Detonics
February 8, 2011, 11:22 AM
On a bobbed hammer gun I make sure the gun is pointed in a safe direction and with my thumb against the hammer pushing forward slightly I use the trigger to bring the hammer back till the cylinder releases...very easy to do but practice with an empty gun. I have been doing it so long it is automatic.

Sam1911
February 8, 2011, 11:24 AM
Yup. As I said. "A bit more difficult."

451 Detonics
February 8, 2011, 11:31 AM
I don't find it difficult at all and do it every time i load my Model 12. I also spin check the cylinder using the trigger on my 642 which is completely hammerless. You just have to use caution. You can also spin check without completely closing the cylinder if that feels safer to you.

Carl N. Brown
February 8, 2011, 11:35 AM
Generally, no. When handloading, I do inspect every cartridge to be sure there are no high primers. The only "spin check" I might do is when I am carrying a revolver on the mountain, to index the snake shot round as the first to fire.

svtruth
February 8, 2011, 11:35 AM
a violation of one of the four rules.

Sam1911
February 8, 2011, 11:39 AM
Sounds like a violation of one of the four rules.

To be fair, then so are several other fairly common handgun manipulation tasks. Like lowering the hammer on a non-decocker DA/SA auto. Or EVER deciding not to take a shot with an SA revolver or lever-action rifle.

There's a right way (and probably quite a few wrong ways) to do it.

cpirtle
February 8, 2011, 11:47 AM
deciding not to take a shot with an SA revolver or lever-action rifle.

In CAS this is handled by the rules. As long as you lower the hammer on an empty round or chamber you are safe, if you lower it on a live round it's a safety violation.

Sam1911
February 8, 2011, 11:53 AM
if you lower it on a live round it's a safety violation.

Right, because of the way many historic firearms were designed. Very dangerous to have a firing pin resting against a primer.

Modern DA revolvers don't risk firing pins hitting primers with a lowered hammer on a live round.

rcmodel
February 8, 2011, 12:02 PM
Spin checking a SA after you load it makes it very difficult to insure the empty chamber ends up under the hammer.

I have to assume if it spins when I "load one, skip one, load four, cock and lower the hammer" it will still spin when I go to shoot it.
If you mess with the correct SA loading sequence and spin it afterwords, you nearly have to look down the barrel & front of the cylinder to make 100% sure the empty chamber is still under the hammer. Especially so with .22 RF SA's with recessed chamber rims, as you can't see them through the crack from the side..

With DA revolvers?
Every round I load is checked in a case guage and double checked for high primers, once during priming, and again in the case guage.
If they fit in the case guage, I know they will work in every revolver I own.

In short, spinning the cylinder is best left to TV & movie actors.

rc

cpirtle
February 8, 2011, 12:19 PM
Right, because of the way many historic firearms were designed. Very dangerous to have a firing pin resting against a primer.

But it is possible to not take a shot with an SA, happens fairly often in CAS. You just rotate the cylinder to the open chamber and gently let the hammer down. Of course you'd be doing that on the clock so you're usually better off to take the miss and move on.


rcmodel, I agree 100% on the rimfire's, my point about doing it during competition is with centerfire only. I personally have had my gun lock on a high primer so skip loading didn't do the trick in that case. I'd say about 50% of the loaders at any given CAS match will spin their cylinder before closing the gate and lowering the hammer on the empty chamber, it's common practice.

I don't have a problem finding the empty nor have a seen a centerfire that qualifies to shoot CAS where you could not see it, there could be SA's out there that are recessed that I'm not aware of. Generally speaking you just look perpendicular to the firing pin, if you see the top of 2 cartridges and clear daylight you're good. A minimum of two sets of eyes check every gun before leaving the loading table just to ensure safety.

hogcowboy
February 8, 2011, 12:36 PM
I have to admit I do but I don't flick it shut. Now that it's been brought up, seems both would cause excess wear. Maybe I'll stop.

texas bulldog
February 8, 2011, 12:38 PM
It's never even crossed my mind to do this. So, no, I don't do it.

451 Detonics
February 8, 2011, 12:47 PM
a violation of one of the four rules.

No rules are absolute and as long as the muzzle is pointed in a safe direction...ie a bullet trap...it is perfectly safe. ( a 5 gallon bucket of wet sand works very well for all calibers)

In short, spinning the cylinder is best left to TV & movie actors.

Then why do so many professional shooters do it in competition?

With DA revolvers?
Every round I load is checked in a case guage and double checked for high primers, once during priming, and again in the case guage.
If they fit in the case guage, I know they will work in every revolver I own.


That's great until you get some powder flakes under the star...all the primer checks in the world won't help then.


I agree with rimfire if done it should be done gently stopping at any sign of resistance. In a SA gun if you follow the proper loading procedure of half cock, load one, skip one, load 4 then close the loading gate and bring the hammer to full cock and let it down the hammer will be on an empty chamber and every primer will have rotated under at least a portion of the recoil shield.

If you don't like spin checking then don't...if you like knowing your cylinder won't bind in competition or on the street and are willing to use just the smallest amount of common sense then it is entirely safe to do so and will not harm the gun.

MrBorland
February 8, 2011, 03:27 PM
Now that it's been brought up, seems both would cause excess wear. Maybe I'll stop.

Stop the spinning cylinder with your forefinger and thumb before you lower the hammer, and I seriously doubt it'll add any wear.

Stopping the spinning cylinder by simply lowering the hammer, on the other hand, will likely eventually help wear the cylinder stops and slots.

jad0110
February 8, 2011, 05:16 PM
I have to admit I do but I don't flick it shut. Now that it's been brought up, seems both would cause excess wear. Maybe I'll stop.

The likely problem with spinning the cylinder with the hammer cocked back partially comes if you release the hammer back down while the cylinder is spinning at a high rate, which abuses/batters the cylinder stop when it pops up and the cylinder's stop notch slams into it. Spinning and letting it come to rest on it's own may or may not be a big deal, so I don't do it.

cpirtle
February 8, 2011, 05:23 PM
In a SA gun if you follow the proper loading procedure of half cock, load one, skip one, load 4 then close the loading gate and bring the hammer to full cock and let it down the hammer will be on an empty chamber and every primer will have rotated under at least a portion of the recoil shield.

Not trying to split hairs but the primer on last round you load will barely even clear the gate area, the one prior to that may get 1/2" into the rotation. This doesn't adequately test for a high primer on those 2 rounds, when you are on the clock.

I loaded using the skip method for 4 years until I was in first place running a clean shoot and took 3 misses at a major match because of a high primer. I had shot thousands of rounds through that gun leading up to the failure and thousands since without a high primer but it only took once to learn my lesson.

Owen
February 8, 2011, 06:12 PM
i've never even heard of this before, so no, I don't do it.

earplug
February 8, 2011, 07:19 PM
Can have cast bullet lube build up, high primer, bent moon clip, lead build up on cylinder face, dirt under extractor.
Don't have to spin it fast, just enough to ensure operation.
Knowledge that its going to work relaxes me. I'm happy.

451 Detonics
February 9, 2011, 08:23 AM
You don't have to make the thing spin like a slot machine, making it spin a dozen times completely around. All you need a one complete rotation. Pull back the hammer and roll the cylinder with one long, slow, continuous swipe of your palm. It does not add any more wear and tear to your gun than shooting it does.

420Stainless
February 9, 2011, 08:38 PM
No. I don't shoot competitively, so I'm not worried about it. Only been shooting revolvers for 6 years but so far haven't loaded up any with high primers.

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