Problems with 45 seating die.


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2rott
February 9, 2011, 04:04 PM
I've been having problems since I started reloading recently with hand me down reloading equipment. The equipment seems fine but when I tried to load 45ACP I ran into problems crimping & seating. I have an RCBS 3-Die TC set for .45 auto & am trying to load 160 G lead SWC/FP bullets. I finally checked the die to see if it was clean & ended up spraying with Brake Cleaner & loads of wax & rings of lead came out. I thought I solved my problem & loaded a dozen trial rounds. I set up again to load different 45 auto rounds. After setting the seating depth & backing off, I set the crimp & locked the die. I turned the seater die to just touch the crimped & seated bullet & locked the seater plug. Next bullet I tried was seated much deeper. I tried adjusting the seater plug slightly less & the next bullet was much longer. Took the die out to check & found a bunch of wax in it after a dozen rounds. What am I doing wrong? This has happened several times before. Someone told me RCBS taper crimp/seating dies are difficult to adjust.

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Old Scratch
February 9, 2011, 04:28 PM
You might try:

1. Flaring the cases slightly more with your expander. This will shave less lead and wax on seating,

2. Seat and crimp in separate operations. This also helps shave less lead.

3. Wipe the neck area with a clean rag between seating and crimping. This will remove some of the wax build up you are experiencing.

Creating more steps is probably anathema to many, but loading ammunition is not something to be done in a hurry, if you can avoid it.

2rott
February 9, 2011, 05:40 PM
You might try:

1. Flaring the cases slightly more with your expander. This will shave less lead and wax on seating,

2. Seat and crimp in separate operations. This also helps shave less lead.

3. Wipe the neck area with a clean rag between seating and crimping. This will remove some of the wax build up you are experiencing.

Creating more steps is probably anathema to many, but loading ammunition is not something to be done in a hurry, if you can avoid it.
I'll try you're advice & flare more. Maybe the only solution is separate dies.
I just tried again & had the same problem, but this time the OAL came out longer.

BYJO4
February 9, 2011, 06:52 PM
I also agree that you should crimp in a seperate step after seating bullet. You should only need to expand the case mouth enough to start the base of the bullet into the case. Some manufactures use too much lube or poor quality lube on their bullets causing an excess build up of lube in the seater die. You should easily be able to load several hundred rounds before cleaning out the seater die. Also check the diameter of your bullets to insure the are not over sized. You might also check your sizer die and expander to insure proper size. I just had to have RCBS replace 9MM carbide sizer as it would not size case back down to spec and you could just push a bullet into case without expanding.

Walkalong
February 9, 2011, 08:11 PM
Maybe the only solution is separate diesI have loaded thousands of lead bullets in .45 ACP seating and crimping with the same die. So have hundreds, if not thousands, of reloaders before me.

Sure, separate is a little easier to set up, but once set, you never need to change it, just keep it clean.

I agree with Old Scratch. If you are getting that much lube and crud building up that fast you need to flare the brass more to keep from scraping lube off the bullet.

rfwobbly
February 9, 2011, 09:40 PM
The guys are right on. If you load plated or jacketed, then you don't need much "flair" (aka case mouth belling). But for lead you need to be a little more generous. You want to open up the case mouth until you almost never see a lead shaving. The grease build-up is simply something you have to live with.

If all this is too much, try some Berry Mfg plated bullets. No over-size belling. No bullet grease. No smoke when shooting. No barrel leading.

;)

billybob44
February 9, 2011, 10:12 PM
Most suggestions so far are right on. I would ask you what do the SWC bullets that you are loading mic at?? If they are much bigger than .452" then you will have lead shaving problems.
If your bullets mic at .452" then I would seat with one die, and crimp with a different die.
I use the new designed Dillon dies that I can pull apart without losing my adjustments. I seat with one die, and crimp with another die.
If you want to stay with your RCBS then you may add another to crimp with. On MY 9MM+.45acp., I use a Lee Factory Crimp Die to crimp with.
Again check the diameter of the bullets that you are loading-they may be larger than .452" and WILL cause lead shaving that will build up quickly in your dies..Bill.:confused:

pocketchange
February 16, 2011, 03:14 PM
Give de-burring the case a try w/LSWC. It will allow the bullet to sit straighter for seating.
Taper crimping helps too.

MtnCreek
February 16, 2011, 03:23 PM
Most likely a belling issue as the others have stated. Your RCBS die has a insert in it that cane be turned over to match different projectile shapes. Make sure you're using the side that fits your projectiles.

2rott
February 16, 2011, 05:31 PM
Thanks for all the help. I've tried seating & crimping in separate operations & that worked much better. I just ordered the Lee FCD from Midway.

Chuck Perry
February 16, 2011, 09:59 PM
If you plan on shooting a lot of lead, the Lyman M dies are worth their weight in gold. The M dies are expander dies that are especially made to assist with loading cast bullets. They also help you get the bullet started evenly into the case, due to the unique expansion they impart on the case mouth. I have an M die for every pistol caliber I load now, plus 35 Remington and 45-70 (for the big pistols :evil:).

jeepmor
February 17, 2011, 01:30 AM
I recall these as standard issues loading lead rounds. I too went to more case mouth belling and separate seating and crimping operations to minimize the buildup of lead and wax.

shoot14me
February 17, 2011, 07:09 PM
Just get the Lyman "M" die as suggested above. I fought your problem for years until an old timer turned me on to those magical dies.

2rott
February 17, 2011, 08:23 PM
Thanks guys. I'm going to order the Lyman M die for the 45acp. Do you also think it necessary for revolver cartridges like 38spl & 45colt?

USSR
February 17, 2011, 08:27 PM
The Lyman .45 caliber M die works for both .45ACP and .45 Colt.

Don

Chuck Perry
February 17, 2011, 10:35 PM
I would recommend it for the 38 as well. There is nothing else really like them; they're awesome!

Walkalong
February 18, 2011, 07:23 AM
The Lyman .45 caliber M die works for both .45ACP and .45 Colt.My .45 Colt die set includes a Lyman M die. Good stuff. My .45 ACP die set includes a Redding copy of the M die. Also good stuff.

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