What is the best DA trigger on a current production .22 revolver?


PDA






Animal Mother
February 10, 2011, 07:46 PM
I've been looking at .22 LR revolvers, and want to get a new production revolver with a nice DA trigger. It appears to me that based on that criteria I'm limited to either the S&W 617 or the classic Model 17 or 18. I see that there is a Model 617 with either 6 or 10 shots. Does the capacity have any effect on the trigger?

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22-rimfire
February 10, 2011, 10:29 PM
The cylinder capacity has no effect on the trigger that I am aware of. The frame size has an indirect effect due to the springs that are used. Generally smaller the frame size, harder the trigger.

You are pretty much limited to the Smith revolvers you mentioned. I do like the Model 63. I have a 5" and they now only make a 3". The trigger isn't bad for a J-frame. Smooth but a bit stiff. I am content. The M617 trigger should be better. I don't have a 617, only a couple M17's and an 18.

The Colt Trooper Mark III has an okay trigger. It is obviously not in current production, but you can find them in as-new condition and cost about the same as M17's. They will all have 6-round cylinders. The Colt Diamondback generally has a better trigger than the Trooper.

Honestly, I shoot them single action more than double action anyway.

Tacoma
February 10, 2011, 11:04 PM
All current production K framed S&W's will have pretty much the same trigger. All are easy to lighten the pull on if desired.
As for 6 vs 10 shot, many seasoned wheelgun shooters do not like the feel of the trigger on the 10 shot as it's a shorter stroke. If this is your first revolver, or you don't shoot allot of others, you may actually preffer the 10 shot version. I have both and can tell you there is a difference. Not a huge one but notable.

BCRider
February 11, 2011, 01:37 AM
If you are looking for a nice trigger out of the box there really is only the one choice. Either the S&W 617 or the Models 17 or 18 from their current Classics series. Or with some patience you could find a 17, 18 or K22 used somewhere.

If you're willing to buy a gun and then have it modified to improve the trigger than perhaps a Taurus 94 would be a good starting basis.

MrBorland
February 11, 2011, 11:19 AM
If you are looking for a nice trigger out of the box there really is only the one choice. Either the S&W 617 or the Models 17 or 18 from their current Classics series. Or with some patience you could find a 17, 18 or K22 used somewhere.

Agreed, though there are few factory triggers, the 617 and 17 included, that can't be improved further by a good action job by a good revolver 'smith. Note that rimfire ammo is relatively tough to ignite, so these triggers can't be lightened much without running into reliability issues. A good 'smith can lighten it some, but make it smoother, and smooth is more important than light.

I see that there is a Model 617 with either 6 or 10 shots. Does the capacity have any effect on the trigger?

I have a 10-shot 617 and a 6-shot K-22 (a pre-17) and the triggers are comparable in terms of pull weight and when the sear breaks.

Some say the 10-shot has a shorter stroke, but I don't feel it. The 10-shot uses a different hand that's likely shorter, so the cylinder locks into position with less cylinder rotation, but with similar pull length. And it really needs to be like this, otherwise, the 10-shot hammer would fall much earlier than the 6-shot, imparting less "oompf" to the case rim, leading to reliability issues unless a stiffer mainspring was also used. It'd also stands to reason that the pull of the 10-shot can't be lowered as much as the 6-shot before misfires start occurring, and I've never read or heard that yet.

RugRev
February 11, 2011, 01:00 PM
I would vote for the 17, 18 or 617 as lightest trigger possible. With tuning the k frame .22LR's in my experience can be reduced to about 8 lbs. DA which is 1 to 1.5 lbs heavier than a centerfire counterpart. The Diamondback is built on a small frame so I doubt a tuned .22LR could get down below 9 lbs to 9.5 lbs. I had one once in .22LR I wish I had back considering the current prices they sell for. I sold it as I liked the trigger better on my K frame .22. The Trooper sized frame might get a bit less than the D'back pullwise, I don't know. The Dan Wesson .22LR would be heavier than these as although it is a medium frame it has a very short hammer arc requiring a relatively heavy spring. The SP-101 .22 would also have to have a trigger around 9.5 to 10 lbs. DA.

"If you're willing to buy a gun and then have it modified to improve the trigger than perhaps a Taurus 94 would be a good starting basis."

I doubt the Taurus could get anywhere near a K frame in pull quality or weight. It is a small frame gun and from what I have come across on the boards (no first hand experience) one can change the trigger return spring to a Wolff 6.5 lb one and reduce the trigger pull somewhat but the mainspring must stay as is or misfires will occur. One probably would be better trigger-wise with a J frame or SP-101 in the small frame catagory. The other problem is finding a gunsmith that will work on a Taurus.

22-rimfire
February 11, 2011, 01:27 PM
I haven't shot my Trooper Mark III's in 22. The 357 mag version has a fine trigger. As far as I know it has not been gunsmithed. Bought it slightly used a few years ago. It is my favorite range 357 mag revolver and I love the trigger. My suggestion is that if you find a Trooper Mark III that you don't discount this revolver because it is not currently produced. The only thing about them is you do not want to dry fire them as they are known for breaking firing pins when dry firing.

MCgunner
February 11, 2011, 01:48 PM
The best is a K frame, period. All the little J frame stuff are stiffer'n all get out. They're "kit guns", though, and more an outdoor thing shot SA than a DA revolver. That's how I look at mine, anyway.

halfmoonclip
February 11, 2011, 03:47 PM
I've seen decent triggers on J and K frames; one of the nicest DA triggers I've seen was on a Centennial.

My (much) older M63 has a grooved trigger; you're probably better off with a smooth, rounded triggerface.

I learned to shoot DA with that gun, a 'Little Metal Man' silhouette, and a willingness to shoot a lot of ammo and not be too worried about tiny groups. If the 'blam' was followed by a 'ding' from the LMM taking another beating, I was happy.

The 10 shots I've handled did have a different feel DA, due to the shorter stroke of the hand. It has to get the same size cylinder moving with less mechanical advantage, so it does affect the trigger pull. The hammer and trigger move the same distance as in any other K frame.
Moon

ChristopherG
February 11, 2011, 04:47 PM
Certainly one of the K-frames is the answer to this question. The 10-shot is different than the 6, but it's not a qualitative difference, just a difference.

The way to work on the trigger of a new S&W DA .22 is to shoot it, and dryfire it, and shoot it and... so on.

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