Downsides to reloading.


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slowr1der
February 12, 2011, 07:43 PM
Lately, I've been thinking about the positives and negatives of reloading. I've come up with lots of positives, but the only really negative I can think of is that with factory ammo if you ever get rid of a gun and have left over ammo you can sell the ammo off. Or you could also sell off ammo if you ever have more than you feel you need and prices go up. However, if you have a ton of reloads you can't legally sell them, so if you sell a gun and no longer have a need for a caliber you are basically stuck with rounds you might not use. Other than that I can't think of any other negatives. Is this an issue for anyone? Are there any other downsides to reloading?

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dawico
February 12, 2011, 08:00 PM
I have had the same issue. Buyers usually aren't interested in reloads or componants.

Another downside is looking at all the empty cases and componants I have, and feeling like a lazy butt by not putting them all together.

BeerSleeper
February 12, 2011, 08:06 PM
If you've loaded "a ton of reloads" for a caliber you have one gun for, and sell that gun, perhaps that's poor planning.

There's nothing to prevent you from selling off your ammo cache, reloaded or not.

You do need some sort of license to be "remanufacturing ammo for the purpose of resale for a profit", but one guy selling off surplus inventory of a caliber he's abandoned can make a pretty strong argument he's not in the business of reloading for profit.

Whether or not you want to take on the liability of someone else shooting your reloads is an entirely different question.

918v
February 12, 2011, 08:51 PM
Excuses, excuses, excuses...

Coltdriver
February 12, 2011, 08:53 PM
Exposure to lead and mercury is a downside.

Iam2taz
February 12, 2011, 09:00 PM
The initial cost.
After that its all down hill.
I am only reloading calibers that I have. It is a short list. However, I know a number of people who would cash out my 9mms or .308s tonight, if I wanted to sell them. If you do a good job reloading and your friends know about it, you won't have one bit of trouble selling your extras.
I am sticking to conservative platforms though. 9mm, .38 /.357, .45, .223 and .308. All easily traded or sold.

Reokue
February 12, 2011, 09:01 PM
If you reload a ton of a caliber and then have no need for a caliber, that's really really bad planning. For my single gun calibers, I only reload as needed or a small surplus.

-Reokue

Chris Rhines
February 12, 2011, 09:12 PM
Downsides?

Reloading is insanely, mind-numbingly, soul-crushingly boring. There have been people found, slumped in front of their reloading presses, eyes glazed over, dead of sheer ennui...

I do it anyway, but nothing short of a lobotomy will ever get me to enjoy it.

-C

dave from mesa
February 12, 2011, 09:38 PM
Downsides?

Reloading is insanely, mind-numbingly, soul-crushingly boring. There have been people found, slumped in front of their reloading presses, eyes glazed over, dead of sheer ennui...

I do it anyway, but nothing short of a lobotomy will ever get me to enjoy it.

What he said.

TH3180
February 12, 2011, 09:44 PM
Blisters, that's the only one I can think of.

JimKirk
February 12, 2011, 09:52 PM
If you reload and sell the gun for which you have all them reloads...

Downside is ..... now you got to go buy another gun:D

Jimmy K

GLOOB
February 12, 2011, 10:07 PM
The biggest downside is that you'll forever feel compelled to pick up your brass.

918v
February 12, 2011, 10:19 PM
Exposure to lead and mercury is a downside.

We don't taste our reloads, hence our exposure to lead or mercury is nill.

TH3180
February 12, 2011, 10:48 PM
We don't taste our reloads, hence our exposure to lead or mercury is nill.
Speak for yourself. 147g taste the best.:D

cfullgraf
February 12, 2011, 10:51 PM
but the only really negative I can think of is that with factory ammo if you ever get rid of a gun and have left over ammo you can sell the ammo off.

Simple, don't ever get rid of a gun. Then there is no downside.

Although as GLOOB said, I get a little obsessed about policing brass sometimes.

Arkansas Paul
February 12, 2011, 10:54 PM
Reloading is insanely, mind-numbingly, soul-crushingly boring.


On the contrary, I find reloading to be a relaxing, fun, interesting, and extremely satisfying way to spend a few hours.

The downside for me is that I spend more money than I used to. "Baby, I've got to get into this. I'll save a ton of money." Yeah right!!! There's always something else to get. But that's not a bad thing.

LightningMan
February 12, 2011, 10:57 PM
The only downside to reloading I can think of is it takes time to do it, time you could use doing something else. Now if you can get someone to do it for you, you've got that solved. LM

Curator
February 12, 2011, 11:18 PM
I listen to "Books on Tape" while reloading (thanks Mike Venturino)that way I am also involved in literary activities and broading my mind while doing repetitive, boring work. Last week I "read" (listened actually to) two complete books. How can you beat that, improving my mind while saving money and finding new excuses (reasons) to go to thte range to try them out? Win, Win, Win, in my estimation.

dawico
February 13, 2011, 12:30 AM
There is nothing worse than looking in the grass for one piece of brass, and nothing better than finding it.

Sport45
February 13, 2011, 06:05 AM
The biggest downside is that you'll forever feel compelled to pick up your brass.

That's not a downside. It's another money saving feature. Sometimes I find myself spending more time scrounging brass than I spend shooting.

Sniderman
February 13, 2011, 06:21 AM
The biggest downside is that you'll forever feel compelled to pick up your brass.

So, shoot a wheelgun! :p

Skyshot
February 13, 2011, 08:23 AM
What downside, brass will soon be the new gold!

kbbailey
February 13, 2011, 08:52 AM
Before I built the man-cave/reloading room in the shed, I kept my mec reloader with it's 200 rd shot capacity bottles in an upstairs room. My wife was cleaning that room one day and accidently knocked the reloader over, breaking the plastic tube and sending about 10 lbs of #8 shot all over the old wood flooring.
That was 20 yrs ago....We are currently remodeling that room and have ripped up the old carpet. I still get the "stink-eye" look whenever you hear the distinctive sound of lead shot rattling through the vaccuum sweeper

MissouriBullet
February 13, 2011, 08:57 AM
..if you ever get rid of a gun

"Get rid of a gun?"

Friendly, Don't Fire!
February 13, 2011, 09:12 AM
While I am reloading, I am constantly thinking of ways to make the job more efficient. I do not mind having to do 500 actions on my Single Stage Rock Chucker press. I think of ways to make the job go a bit quicker, like putting one of those yellow and black clamp things on the arm of the press so I am not bringing the ram all the way to the bottom if I am reloading short cases like .380. Shorter strokes on the handle all add up.

I figure any movement that I can eliminate makes the job go just a bit faster. When I am setting primers in four trays of 50 (dedicated Frankford Arsenal Blue Trays), I have learned to pick up one that needs priming and take the one just primed out of the shell holder and put the case in that is ready for a primer. While I am priming the current case, I am picking up the next case that needs priming and so on. It takes a bit of manual dexterity, but once you have it down, it makes things go a lot more smoothly.

When I get to the point where it even begins to feel at all monotonous, I typically stop as I realize that monotony could lead to something negatively happening (or not happening). My press and all is in the basement. I don't have kids, so whichever way I leave it, when I come back, even in two months, it is just as I left it. I do make notes on post-its to let myself know what has been done and what needs doing. So, when I start again, there is no question where I left off!

As for getting rid of a gun, I am over that. I no longer get rid of any of my guns. I got to the point where I have just what I need, nothing more, nothing less.

rfwobbly
February 13, 2011, 09:47 AM
Reloading is insanely, mind-numbingly, soul-crushingly boring.

2 words: Electric Motor :D

x_wrench
February 13, 2011, 10:13 AM
do it anyway, but nothing short of a lobotomy will ever get me to enjoy it.

then you are not doing it right! if all you are doing is loading one load so you can go bang bang bang at a peice of paper, yes, it is going to be boring. however, if you actually try to acheive something, like much improved accuracy, or better balistitics than what is available by buying ammo at wal-mart, or loading for a specific purpose. then you are missing ALL of the fun. yes, i do load quite a bit of handgun ammo to be shot at paper targets. and yes, some if it is just slap it together with known good loads, that require no extra effort. but the fun (or insanity perhaps) comes when you try to get sub 1/2 or better moa groups from a specific firearm. then try to better that result by changing one item at a time. of course the goal is unobtainable, of 10 shots through the exact same hole @ whatever distance you deem appropriate. if you add in molding you own bullets to the mix, then it gets even more interesting (or insane). i am sure i will go insane before it is all said and done, but it is better than sitting in the house, watching tv until i die!

TexasRifleman
February 13, 2011, 10:22 AM
Although as GLOOB said, I get a little obsessed about policing brass sometimes.

This is probably the worst. Sometimes I spend more time looking for brass than shooting and I get annoyed with myself :)

Reloading is insanely, mind-numbingly, soul-crushingly boring.

So is television, so I sit at the reloading bench instead :)

howlnmad
February 13, 2011, 10:45 AM
There's a downside?

snuffy
February 13, 2011, 11:29 AM
First, there's no mercury involved with today's loading. Exposure to metallic lead is a concern, but only if you don't wash your hands, then eat something with your hands. Lead salts in the form of primer residue, IS a concern, especially if you're using a tumbler to clean cases.

Second, if I didn't enjoy it, I wouldn't do it. If it's a chore, then you're destined to make a mistake.

Third, there's ways to make it more efficient, IE, progressive loaders. Read that as faster, to get it over with quicker. I'm a tinkerer by heart. I HAVE to know how things work, that's why I got into reloading. I find myself to be always trying to find a better load, keeps me interested. If you don't have an inquisitive nature, you'll get bored real quick.

4, Sell a gun? Why in the world would you want to sell one of your guns? That's akin to selling a child, or your loving dog.

BeerSleeper
February 13, 2011, 12:07 PM
Sell a gun? Why in the world would you want to sell one of your guns? That's akin to selling a child, or your loving dog.
I'd sooner compare it to selling a car. Typically, you do it to make room for a better car.

You can sell a gun and put the proceeds toward a better gun. Tough to do that with a child or a dog.

cfullgraf
February 13, 2011, 12:10 PM
This is probably the worst. Sometimes I spend more time looking for brass than shooting and I get annoyed with myself :)


I spread out several large drop clothes to catch brass and have a metal detector. Even so, I begrudgingly accept up to a 2% loss rate in the grass.

res45
February 13, 2011, 12:17 PM
You don't have to be a reloader to get exposed to lead,people that shoot in indoor ranges not properly ventilated can have a higher blood level content that a reloader that takes the proper precautions when handling lead bullets or casting.

I've cast and reloaded for nearly 30 years and my blood lever are normal. My only downside to reloading is I keep wanting to buy different calibers so I can reload them,this stuff is addicting.

Xfire68
February 13, 2011, 12:35 PM
Exposure to lead and mercury is a downside.

I always thought that was a Plus! I always wanted to be a Super Hero and the only way to become one is to be exposed to a dangerous combo of industrial chemicals and hope for that one "Freak" accident to happen and Poof I am Spider/Hawk/Woodchuck Man! :)


On the serious side I don't see many if any real down sides to reloading. I would call them trade offs and the good out weight the bad.

Bush Pilot
February 13, 2011, 01:03 PM
Before I built the man-cave/reloading room in the shed, I kept my mec reloader with it's 200 rd shot capacity bottles in an upstairs room. My wife was cleaning that room one day and accidently knocked the reloader over, breaking the plastic tube and sending about 10 lbs of #8 shot all over the old wood flooring.
That was 20 yrs ago....We are currently remodeling that room and have ripped up the old carpet. I still get the "stink-eye" look whenever you hear the distinctive sound of lead shot rattling through the vaccuum sweeper
You don't remind her who knocked it over years ago? Guess not, you're still alive.

kbbailey
February 13, 2011, 01:24 PM
You don't remind her who knocked it over years ago? Guess not, you're still alive.

She's a pretty good sport...I occasionally clean my black powder guns in her claw-foot bathtub...she insists on getting out first though.

swiftak
February 13, 2011, 02:20 PM
The problem with reloading is that its going to cost me more money. The only time I come out of my reloading room is to watch the news. I get so depressed that I go back in right away. If I buy a TV for the room I won't have to come out for anything.
Won't my wife be thrilled. Anyone got an old army cot?

Tuckerp229
February 13, 2011, 04:25 PM
Lately, I've been thinking about the positives and negatives of reloading. I've come up with lots of positives, but the only really negative I can think of is that with factory ammo if you ever get rid of a gun and have left over ammo you can sell the ammo off. Or you could also sell off ammo if you ever have more than you feel you need and prices go up. However, if you have a ton of reloads you can't legally sell them, so if you sell a gun and no longer have a need for a caliber you are basically stuck with rounds you might not use. Other than that I can't think of any other negatives. Is this an issue for anyone? Are there any other downsides to reloading?

Big downside for me is that I cannot get enough of it, nor can I have enough die calibers nor new presses or specialty tools. As with the printers you buy, it is not the price of the printer that kills you , it is the toner, all the stuff that you "just gotta have" to go along with reloading.

Rollis R. Karvellis
February 13, 2011, 04:55 PM
Wait till you start scrounging lead.

TH3180
February 13, 2011, 05:10 PM
I did find one down side a few weeks ago. Dried blood is a real pain to get off a press. That's what happens when you try to de-prime your thumb.

McCall911
February 13, 2011, 05:16 PM
To me:
1--More clutter and expense than I could possibly bear.
2--I have very little patience.
3--The idea of reloading scares the crap out of me.

Hey, somebody has to keep those poor ammo makers in business! :D

mbruce
February 13, 2011, 05:22 PM
Only downside for me is shortage/availability of components...

Hondo 60
February 13, 2011, 08:13 PM
Downside?

I bought a 7.62x25 Tokarev. & a spam can of ammo.
The ammo is surplus commie stuff, so it's berdan primed.
And it bugs me to no end that I can't reload it!!!!!!!!
I hate having to just recycle all that brass. ;)

oneounceload
February 13, 2011, 08:33 PM
Downsides -
Exposure to materials known to cause health issues if you are not careful (think little kids)

Space needed is more than a comparable amount of factory loaded ammo

Savings come from buying components in bulk (see space above)

Having too much of incompatible components on hand means having to buy more in bulk

Takes time - for some that is a critical issue

rsrocket1
February 13, 2011, 09:29 PM
Downsides:
You get into reloading to save money and spend way more money overall because you are shooting more than ever.

You feel compelled to find that "perfect load" and run through a hundred rounds by the time you "think" you found the perfect load for your gun, but aren't quite sure you shouldn't now run through another hundred to find the perfect seating depth for that perfect load.

You blow through a pound of every powder on the store shelf looking for that extra 1/4 MOA for your "plinking" rounds.

You load up 1000 rounds for SHTF and keep them stashed "just in case" (are you sure that load has the perfect terminal ballistic for hunting wild animals AND home defense?).

You are never satisfied unless you have at least 1 each of
A sealed 8 pound jug of fast and slow rifle powders
A sealed 8 pound jug of pistol powder
1k each of any primer type you need
500-1000 projectiles for the calibers you reload
1k+ brass ready for reloading of each caliber you shoot.

There are more and more chunks of time where your whereabouts are unaccounted for by your family until they simply write it off to "he's reloading".

You shoot in order to reload.

I'm sure many of you can think of more downsides.

EMC45
February 14, 2011, 02:24 PM
Reloading boring??!?!!?!?!?!?!?! NEVER! From scrounging WWs to picking up brass to banging steel plates to bringing home dinner....Reloading will never get old. I told my brother yesterday that if I couldn't reload then I don't even want to shoot anymore. It is what makes shooting fun for me. I have reloaded since 98 and have been shooting since 82. I have thousands upon thousands of primers, more powder than I can recall, and brass out the wazoo. About 19 5 gallon buckets of un-rendered WWs so I have my work cut out for me. I thank God for the freedom we have and the ability to do the things we do in the reloading/shooting community!......P.S. There is a downside....Trimming brass!!

cougar1717
February 14, 2011, 02:42 PM
The downside (for me) is that there will be a time when you want to go shooting, but you didn't have the time to replenish your ammo pile. At least there's rimfire.

dmazur
February 14, 2011, 02:42 PM
Reloading is insanely, mind-numbingly, soul-crushingly boring.

Well, I suppose it could be. I work on home-improvement projects, too, and painting is right in there for an excitement level. I've found it to be less boring, however, if you don't actually watch the paint dry...

I also tie flies. There is a certain satisfaction is catching a fish on a fly that was the product of 30 minutes of eye-squinting, tedious frustration. The bad thing about tying flies is that they get completely lost when they get lost...there are no components to recover.

No, reloading can be a challenge, as others have said. If you're trying for accuracy with a rifle, you can try dozens of combinations of powder charge and seating depth until you find the right one. And you need to keep records of all that if you're going to avoid chasing yourself. If you're just reloading for pistol competition, there's the challenge of getting the process down so you can reload 2000 rounds that are as good as factory. No double charges and no squibs, because you were paying attention the whole time.

It's a mindset thing. Almost anything you do can be boring, if you have the wrong mindset. I find it's easier to tune the mindset than to constantly search for something new so I'm not bored... :)

Arkansas Paul
February 14, 2011, 03:34 PM
Quote:
Exposure to lead and mercury is a downside.

I always thought that was a Plus! I always wanted to be a Super Hero and the only way to become one is to be exposed to a dangerous combo of industrial chemicals and hope for that one "Freak" accident to happen and Poof I am Spider/Hawk/Woodchuck Man!

That's just awesome! Let us know how it turns out. :)

Waldog
February 14, 2011, 03:58 PM
The only down side I can think is the "Devil Spawn" of 45 ACP cases with small primer pockets. AND, picking 380 cases out of batch of 9mm cases.

Otherwise, I see no downside what so ever!!

BeerSleeper
February 14, 2011, 07:10 PM
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=270949

Not a great way to sort 380 from 9, but the best one I've found so far.

45Autoloader
February 14, 2011, 07:15 PM
Downside?

Looking up at the clock and realizing it is 2:00 am and you have to go to work in the morning....

BigBob3006
February 14, 2011, 08:22 PM
With very few exceptions, I seem to always sell to friends. Well they don't buy the reloaded ammo, I get a higher price if it goes with the rifle. I also get higher prices than I'd ever get in a trade. I also keep a steno pad on every rifle I've ever owned and it contains Everything I've ever had done to the rifle and by whom. It also contains all test performed on the rifle and the results. It also contains a lot of particle test that end in N.D.G.These pads also go with the rifle.

Every once in a while I'll get a call from a friend of a friend of a friend who have looked at one of these pads and call for suggestions or help. I get to meet people I would never have met otherwise.

jolly roger
February 14, 2011, 09:37 PM
Downsides are that I HATE sorting various brass for tumbling. Love the loading though. Very relaxing. Regarding vacuums...my wife sucked up a live primer that I apparently let escape from a box. Kaboomed in the vac bag with no problem but...I now vacuum the reloading room...

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