I never liked Revolvers...


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Josh45
February 22, 2011, 03:31 PM
I don't know why but I never did....But I went to a store and I asked the guy at the counter about them and he let me hold one. I know the barrel was 2-3 inch but I can't remember what caliber nor make. It was extremley light. Like holding nothing.

The more I thought about it and after trying to carry my 24/7 45 and seeing how heavy it is..Well, Now Im thinking about getting one.

So my question is this, Limit would be about $400-$450 on it. I prefer 6 shot. SA Would be nice but can deal with SA/DA. Would like to use this as a carry. 2-3' bbl.

As for calibers, Something that is easy to find. 38? .357? .327? Nothing to extreme anyways! I would like to use this as my carry/plinking/range even.

Any reccomendations for a first revolver?

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docnyt
February 22, 2011, 03:45 PM
It's probably not a god idea to have a lightweight 357 revolver due to the recoil. You must have handled an airweight or such.

I'm not really a revolver fan but I do like my Dan Wesson 357 magnum with the swappable barrels. At least I can switch to 38 special. And with 2 to 4 inch barrels I have the option to carry.

Now the 44 magnum on the other hand, is a hand cannon...

Josh45
February 22, 2011, 03:57 PM
It must have been an airweight as you say because it was just to light for me. Recoil would have been horrible Im sure if I knew the caliber.

As for the 44 mag, I would love to own one but I would not be crazy for the recoil anyways.

Im still waiting for more opinions and what there take is on the recoils and for which caliber would be good.

Olympus
February 22, 2011, 04:10 PM
A good K-frame Model 19 or 66 would be my recommendation.

http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa121/adambrown69/PC040016.jpg

http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa121/adambrown69/PB060019.jpg

http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa121/adambrown69/PA300007.jpg

http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa121/adambrown69/PA300016.jpg

NMGonzo
February 22, 2011, 04:35 PM
Ruger sp101

Pick your caliber, pick your barrel

W.E.G.
February 22, 2011, 04:36 PM
You will NOT enjoy "plinking" with any airweight revolver in larger than .32 caliber.

Some people say they "don't mind" .38 Special recoil in an airweight.
Let me tell you, MOST PEOPLE do mind it quite a lot.

If its just carried for self defense, you can probably stand to shoot an airweight often enough to become proficient. That you may become proficient, DOES NOT MEAN the process will be much fun.

If you want a recreational revolver, that will be adequate for defense and concealed carry, you want a four-inch .357 magnum with STEEL FRAME. You can shoot light .38's for plinking. But mind you, a four-inch .357 is NOT a compact weapon.

Here is a pic of how a four-inch Ruger .357 compares to a FULL-SIZE Glock (.40 caliber).
The Ruger is "bigger."

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/pistol%20pics/securitysixcomparedG22.jpg

Starter52
February 22, 2011, 04:55 PM
A J-frame S&W in .38 special (5-shot) or a Colt Detective Special (6-shot) might be worth looking at. Both can be found with a steel frame and both would seem lightweight compared to a 1911.

Remo223
February 22, 2011, 05:26 PM
I DO like revolvers. But there are things about revolvers you probably won't like.

The cylinder is really fat and makes concealed carry on/in your belt not so fun.

The grip angle is different than most semis

reloading is a nuisance unless you carry speedloaders and carrying speed loaders is a nuisance. Moon clips are a nuisance to carry too.

quite often the trigger sucks in double action unless you get it tuned up and that can be expensive if you want a primo job.

To truly make a revolver concealable you need the tiniest grip you can find. That makes shooting it more difficult. Also the small grips are out of vogue nowdays and are not easy to find.

Here's my ideas...

the smallest revolver cylinder made that I know of is a charter arms undercover. It's 5 shot and rated for 38 special. It comes in a lightweight aluminum model nowdays. It has a smaller cylinder than smith or ruger 5 shooters. New ones come with large rubber grips though. throw those away. Buy a set of barami hip grips for your charter.

Full power 38 specials are not real fun to shoot in a little snubby but they aren't as bad as 357. I prefer the lower powered wad cutters. I can shoot wad cutters in my tiny grip charter all day long, one handed rapid fire. Absolutely painless.

LKB3rd
February 22, 2011, 05:52 PM
I'd go with a .38 special that can handle +p, and shoot it with some regular .38 to practice, and a handful of +p to get an idea of what to expect. A .357 would fit the bill too, but shooting .38 special.

BlindJustice
February 22, 2011, 05:53 PM
The requirements by the O.P. and use seem to not fit one revolver.

If you want a gun for the Range/plinking or to have camping Ruger makes
a robust variety of single action models not smal and not light. The Ruger Blackhawk in 38/357 or .45 Colt it's got an adjustable rear sight.

I have an all steel model 60 3" Bbl. .357 Mag but prefer .38 SPecial +P for
the range and a SD/HD load - it's all steeel and 24 oz. empty weight.

I also have a large N-frame S&W 625 in .45 ACP 5" Bbl. and at 45 oz empty the only way I'd carry it concealed is a vertical (muzzle down) shoulder holster.

I did have a 4" Bbl. medium frame S&W revolver I carried in a Milt Sparks
#AQ200 FBI cant (muzzle a bit angled to the rear ) and it was
concealable as my full size 1911 in a MIlt SParks #Axiom holster w/jacket or vest.

A used S&W 686 4" Bbl. .357 Mag is all steel and in the 37 oz empty weight range.and on the used market within your budget

Randall


.

Josh45
February 22, 2011, 06:22 PM
Olympus, That one looks sweet.

Thank you everyone for your input into this. I have much to consider!

Remo223
February 22, 2011, 06:36 PM
I don't know why so many people seem to have a problem with small revolvers. They do not kick that much with the right ammo. I learned to shoot at ten years old on a colt cobra aluminum frame pocket gun loaded with 158gr lead round nose bullets. I shot that thing a BUNCH! Recoil never bothered me then, it sure shouldn't bother a grown man now. You don't have to put +P ammo in it.

RidgwayCO
February 22, 2011, 07:53 PM
I'd recommend a S&W M67 (adjustable sight) or M64 (fixed sight). You can shoot .38 Special (+P certified) all day in comfort. You can also find used ones in your price bracket with 3" or 4" barrels. Not ideal for CC, but it can be done and it's better than carrying a rock...

Cops carried these for years, and I never heard they were being decimated by the bad guys. Heck, European cops carried .380 Autos, and I never heard they were being slaughtered either...

Deaf Smith
February 23, 2011, 10:43 PM
Josh,

Either a good Ruger or Smith will do. These two are MINE!

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=129168&d=1287341282

and maybe you want just a .38!

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=137053&d=1298591657

Deaf

dallascj
February 23, 2011, 10:55 PM
Since you already have a Taurus, I would recommend the Taurus 605 (.357) or the Rossi 461. Both can be had with 3 inch barrels which greatly helps with accuracy and recoil reduction. You should also try to rent a small frame gun before you decide to purchase, as like some have said, many do not like to shoot them, but I actually enjoy them. I also like the challenge of trying to shoot a small revolver well.
BTW, you absolutely can't go wrong the a S&W k-frame. The Model 66 is great.

george29
February 24, 2011, 01:39 AM
Just remember, the way you grip a semi-auto is not the way you grip a revolver.

ArchAngelCD
February 24, 2011, 02:49 AM
If you want a small .38 Special +P within your price range take a look at the Charger Arms Police Undercover (http://www.charterfirearms.com/products/Charter_Undercover_73840.html). It's a very good revolver...

KJS
February 24, 2011, 05:39 AM
Just remember, the way you grip a semi-auto is not the way you grip a revolver.

Exactly how do you grip them differently?

I'm asking because I'm still a relative novice who started with a revolver. I grip semi-autos in the same manner I grip a revolver, which is with my left thumb wrapped over my right thumb.

When I see a picture of a semi-auto being used I invariably see two thumbs pointing forward unlike my method of both thumbs being far back.

Just wondering.

NMGonzo
February 24, 2011, 11:25 AM
If I grip two thumbs crossed back on my semi I will get a left bloody thumb.

Manco
February 24, 2011, 01:33 PM
I don't know why but I never did....

Did you grow up watching westerns? ;)

The more I thought about it and after trying to carry my 24/7 45 and seeing how heavy it is..Well, Now Im thinking about getting one.

Well, revolvers are similar to autos in weight, by and large, if similar materials and calibers are used, so I'm not sure that's a good reason. Simplicity and ultra-reliability, on the other hand, are examples of good reasons, in my view.

SA Would be nice but can deal with SA/DA.

Do you mean DAO would be nice? Your statement just seems a bit unusual when used in reference to revolvers, so I thought I'd ask. :scrutiny:

As for calibers, Something that is easy to find. 38? .357? .327? Nothing to extreme anyways! I would like to use this as my carry/plinking/range even.

If you're open to .327 Federal Magnum, then you can have 6 shots in a small, steel-framed revolver from S&W (J-Frame Model 632) or Ruger (SP101, KSP-32731X). Otherwise, you'll have to choose between a larger revolver that will be harder to carry (but nicer for the range) and 5-shot capacity in an easier to carry small-frame revolver.

I grip semi-autos in the same manner I grip a revolver, which is with my left thumb wrapped over my right thumb.

So do I. For me it helps with retention, and I shoot just as well or better with it than the popular two-thumbs-forward grip.

If I grip two thumbs crossed back on my semi I will get a left bloody thumb.

My thumbs are both below the slide when I use such a grip (which is all the time these days). I guess our hands and/or some details of our grip techniques are different.

webfox
February 24, 2011, 04:28 PM
Have you tried going to a range that rents firearms? That's what I did.

Now I own a .44 mag. :D (The recoil isn't what they claim in the movies. I shoot mine one-handed, and though slower, am still accurate - well as accurate as I can be. I'm not a competitor.)

For personal carry/ED carry, try the .38s, the magnums, the featherlights... if it's really a day to day carry item, and your life were on the line, you should research it a little and, unfortunately spend a little to find out what works for you.

Good luck in your choice. I think you'll be happy with a revolver.

Deaf Smith
February 24, 2011, 06:54 PM
And Josh,

You will really get to like wheelguns!

Deaf

hogshead
February 24, 2011, 07:28 PM
Revolvers rock. I used to be a glock man. But now I have become a diehard single action man. If you reload revolvers are even better, no searching for brass.

Hondo 60
February 24, 2011, 08:27 PM
I've found that the gun that fits your hand is the best one for you.

A K-frame S&W from the 60s-80s like a M10-5, or a M66 are great guns.

If you really want a brand new one, a Ruger SP101 - those are built like tanks & will last forever.
Your great-great grandchildren will be having fun with it.

agtman
February 24, 2011, 09:37 PM
"I never liked revolvers ..."

Well, I shoot the 10mm extensively, but own two .357 wheelies. One's a Ruger, the other a Smith.

Then I have a line on an reasonably-priced, Old School model 29, like what this guy's showing ... :what:

http://i372.photobucket.com/albums/oo166/agtman/motivator6223be86d768fdf9d37b7fd74937a22b05569439.jpg

:cool:

KJS
February 25, 2011, 03:42 AM
Have you tried going to a range that rents firearms? That's what I did.

Now I own a .44 mag. (The recoil isn't what they claim in the movies. I shoot mine one-handed, and though slower, am still accurate - well as accurate as I can be. I'm not a competitor.)

Fully agree that renting to try before you buy is an excellent idea.

As for a .44 Mag, seems excessive for self-defense against humans, though certainly a fun gun to play with. Not to mention heavy & bulky, though one quickly learns the benefits of a 3 pound gun when shooting a caliber that kicks hard.

Actually, if one were to believe movies, they might think a .44 Mag doesn't recoil at all. Dirty Harry held his S&W Model 29 with just one hand and the muzzle didn't rise at all, so use blanks and we can all get that too. I've rented a .44 as I had to see what this iconic gun is like. Actually, I found it easy to handle and not nearly as harsh as I thought it might be (using factory ammo -- I know handloaders can produce truly brutal recoil with really hot loads). Still, even just using standard 240 gr factory ammo my hand was still a bit sore the next day after 100 rounds.

Tony_the_tiger
February 25, 2011, 04:03 AM
Get an SP101 :)

http://rugerforum.net/gun-gallery/5965-lets-see-your-sp101s.html
:neener:

KJS
February 25, 2011, 05:34 AM
^Not sure if 25 - 27 ounces qualifies as really light, like holding nothing as was originally sought.

That's tiny & really light by my standards, but then I don't wear a gun, so I like lots of weight to tame recoil.

agtman
February 25, 2011, 08:34 AM
*** Actually, if one were to believe movies, they might think a .44 Mag doesn't recoil at all. Dirty Harry held his S&W Model 29 with just one hand and the muzzle didn't rise at all, so use blanks and we can all get that too. I've rented a .44 as I had to see what this iconic gun is like. Actually, I found it easy to handle and not nearly as harsh as I thought it might be (using factory ammo -- I know handloaders can produce truly brutal recoil with really hot loads). Still, even just using standard 240 gr factory ammo my hand was still a bit sore the next day after 100 rounds.

Yep, I agree. There's a lot myth and mystique and misinformation that surround the .44 magnum and S&W's model 29 in particular. I never had a .44mag with shorter than a 4" barrel (of the 3 I've owned, 2 had 6" tubes). I never thought the recoil was brutal, but that was all with factory loads, not nuclear-level handloads. :eek:

:cool:

Nar
February 25, 2011, 04:01 PM
Just going to say this because i don't think anyone else has yet. An old S&W model 10. it's a .38 special and I love mine it was the first revolver i bought and it is still one of my favorites. Also you can probably find one used for a fair price.

tom327
February 25, 2011, 11:08 PM
Here are two candidates--S&W Model 10-7, 6 shot .38 special; Ruger SP 101 5 shot .38 special (yes, it's the .38 version).

Of the two, the model 10 is the better shooter, but either would be entirely adequate for carry/self defense.

Both at least $100 below your price limit.

DrLaw
February 26, 2011, 12:05 AM
You sound like a younger person who has only experienced semi-autos.

A revolver will force you to do something that you might not do with a semi-auto.

That is, get accurate. When you are dealing with just 5 or 6 shots, you tend to not just shoot like crazy in hopes you hit something. You tend to want to be fast, but accurate as you don't have all those shots handy, and learning to do a speed reload takes time and practice.

Did you know you can hide a 4" barrel revolver just as easily as a 2" inch? The thick parts of a revolver are the cylinder and grips. The barrel is comparatively thin.

So, my recommendation would be a 4 inch barrel gun, ala a S&W Model 10, 13, or 15 for your first revolver, or the Ruger comparable model. Colts are harder to find and a little more costly than what you were saying. Even some of the good Smiths (pre-lock) are kicking around $500-600 when you find them. Adjustable sights raise prices.

Tell you what, get proficient with a revolver and you will know why Michulek is sooooooo good at what he does.

The Doc is out now. :cool:

engineer88
February 26, 2011, 11:34 AM
The two guns I carry the most are a Ruger SP101 2'' DAO and a bobbed S&W 637. In my personal opinion and needs they fill the two niches I have for carry revolvers. Light, pocketable (637) and durable, iwb (SP101). I like the durability of my SP101 because I like to practice with it often.

Now for just something to shoot at the range, use for home defense or just plain have fun with a 686, GP100, etc makes a lot more sense. However to be fair, I think my little airweight and SP101 could perform admirably for home defense too in a pinch, just not as good as a shotgun.

Try some out at a range of you can. One thing revolvers majorly differ in from autos is if you handle it and don't like the grip, it is no reason not to buy it. You can always change the grips. Good luck!

shootingthebreeze
February 26, 2011, 01:34 PM
For safety purposes I would steer away from "light" aluminum frame revolvers; stick with an all steel design.
Second, you need to shop, shop, shop. Each person is different-each person's hands are different. So again, shop, shop and shop! The weapon must feel comfortable to you, the shooter.

george29
February 26, 2011, 02:05 PM
A revolver needs to be gripped hard and high, been described as choking the grip up high. A semi-auto one grips usually as high as the tang if available, but usually no higher than the grip itself. Inevitably, shooting most revolvers just by holding the grip will result in limp wristing and missed shots.

I learned shooting with semi-auto's (1911 & 1903), so it was a while until I grasped the concept that a revolver is shot differently.

As has been said here, a K-frame class revolver (10, 13, 15, Lawman, speed-six) as your first revolver would be a good idea.

bikerdoc
February 26, 2011, 02:08 PM
I like revolvers and prefer 3 inch all steel and wood guns especially ruger security sixes. I got 3.

I also like autos especially CZ, and 1911's

But I digress get something that is not light.

loaf_fan
March 8, 2011, 03:14 AM
It's hard to beat a S&W. I purchased a Model 66 4 inch to flip and make some money on ($280 cash, and not wore at all.) then found I could not part with it. It's going to be my CCW if Illinois ever gets with the rest of the country.

BTW Anyone have a suggestion for a good shoulder/carry holster for my S&W that doesn't cost an arm and a leg? Say under $50?

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