Some very newbie questions


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Illyria
February 24, 2011, 03:24 PM
Hi everyone!

Let me first say that I never thought I would be posting in a firearms forum as I have honestly been very afraid of them for most of my life.

I recently have realized that I would, if nothing else, learn how to load/shoot/unload a basic semi-automatic handgun. My main question might sound dumb, but where can I do this? Do I need a license in order to go to a range and take some kind of class? I would ask at a shop, but from reviews I've read, most in my area are very degrading to people who don't already have a good grasp of firearms.

Also, it probably doesn't help that I'm a relatively young (22) and soft-spoken woman.

Anyway, I just wanted to get a little advice from everyone here. Thanks for any feedback! :)

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CoRoMo
February 24, 2011, 03:31 PM
...where can I do this?
Go to this website... http://www.nrainstructors.org/searchcourse.aspx
Check the box next to NRA FIRST Steps Pistol Orientation and NRA Basic Pistol Shooting Course. Enter your zip code.
Do I need a license in order to go to a range and take some kind of class?
A driver's license, probably. No other license that I would assume though, just ID, and maybe not even that is required.
I would ask at a shop, but from reviews I've read, most in my area are very degrading to people who don't already have a good grasp of firearms.
That's a shame, and not too uncommon. Just find an NRA course near you, especially if one has a women's only class and/or good reviews.
Also, it probably doesn't help that I'm a relatively young (22) and soft-spoken woman.
Poppycock!!!

il_10
February 24, 2011, 03:34 PM
First off, congratulations on taking the first step!

Let me first clear up a few common misconceptions. In almost all states, you don't need any license to handle, fire, or own firearms. With only a small few exceptions, there are no registration requirement for firearms. In most states, they are tools and private property no different than any other.

I'm also pleased to hear that you're interested in getting proper training before you jump in. Let us know where you live and I'm sure we can provide some information on a place or two near you where you can get this training. As far as online information, this forum is a wealth of information, and http://corneredcat.com/ is a wonderful source for women shooters written by women shooters.

Lastly, don't let anyone tell you that you can't do anything based solely on the fact that you're a woman. Gun shop chauvinism can run pretty deep, but all the women I've worked with learn to shoot far better and far faster than I did. Handle and fire as many different guns as you can. Find what fits you before you consider purchasing. You may find that the ultra-lightweight snub nosed revolver many gun stores would try to sell you to be far and away a poor choice!

springfield30-06
February 24, 2011, 03:46 PM
Do I need a license in order to go to a range and take some kind of class?

What state are you located in?

Illyria
February 24, 2011, 03:47 PM
I'm in the Southern Connecticut area.

KodiakBeer
February 24, 2011, 03:49 PM
The best advice, and I promise you this is REALLY GOOD ADVICE that will benefit you for years to come, is (after some basic familiarization) to buy a .22 handgun.

The best .22's are by Ruger and Browning, though any .22 will serve.

If you start out with a .22, you will find because of its low recoil and very cheap ammo ($15 for 500 rounds!) that you will become very, very good, very, very fast.

After you've shot thousands of .22 rounds and are a very proficient and safe shooter, then (and only then) begin looking at "serious" handguns. Don't let some guy talk you into going out and buying a Glock or 1911 (or whatever) before you've mastered handgun shooting.

On every range there is a guy (or gal) shooting 7 yard groups the size of a trash can lid and flinching with every shot. Don't be that guy (or gal)... There is a name for those people, that name is: "People who didn't start with a .22". Centerfire ammo costs between $15 and $25 for a box of 50 rounds. .22 ammo costs $15 for a carton of 500 rounds. It takes between 5000 and 10,000 rounds to become truly safe and proficient with a handgun. Between the cost of the ammo and the low recoil, a .22 is the most cost efficient and effective way to get into shooting.

My 2 cents...

2ndAmFan
February 24, 2011, 03:51 PM
+1 to what other posters have said, and welcome to THR. Do be especially careful of what clerks in gun stores will tell you and try to sell you. You have to try out various guns yourself and find what works best for you, and a lot of ranges will rent guns so you can do that. I'd be curious to learn what you try out and what you settle on buying if you want to keep us posted.

kingpin008
February 24, 2011, 04:00 PM
While Kodiak is correct in saying that a .22 handgun is fantastic for learning how to shoot and become proficient with firearms, definitely attend a safety/familiarization course before jumping in with both feet!

As others have said, pretty much any gun shop will either have an introductory course for new shooters, or be able to point you towards one. Just ask around, and you should find something that will work for you.

Good luck, welcome to THR, and enjoy your new interest in firearms! Newbie questions are fine, by the way - especially when it concerns asking for help learning how to be safe and responsible with guns. :)

CoRoMo
February 24, 2011, 04:01 PM
I thought this series of threads by miss lead, was wonderful. Just FYI really.

Confused female (me) needs advice selecting a gun (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=521722)
I finally got to shoot some guns... (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=522608)
Could someone explain what a "target" gun is? (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=523481)
:D I did it. Pictures coming soon. More advice needed. (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=524283)
I have a lot of love for my new S&W revolver - but is it defective? (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=525112)
I can't believe it but I got my carry permit (with picture) (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=529248)
Best SD ammo for a .38 Special (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=530253)

speaksoftly
February 24, 2011, 04:08 PM
First off, congratulations on taking the first step!


+1 Welcome

Uteridge
February 24, 2011, 04:17 PM
I would either go to an NRA first steps pistol orientation or take a course from a respected firearms academy. I am a big fan of Gunsite in Arizona and would highly recommend the Gunsite 150 course out in Arizona or one of their courses in Indiana. LFI run by Massad Ayoob is another well known firearms academy that offers courses in the Northeast including New Hampshire and Connecticut.

KodiakBeer
February 24, 2011, 04:18 PM
While Kodiak is correct in saying that a .22 handgun is fantastic for learning how to shoot and become proficient with firearms, definitely attend a safety/familiarization course before jumping in with both feet!

+1. Buy the .22 AFTER taking a basic safety course.

kayak-man
February 24, 2011, 04:35 PM
Welcome to the THR!

I would recomend taking some form of gunsafety orientation. If you're shooting at a rental range, there may be a brief safety lecture that you are required to go through (5-10min) or there may not.

They will probably tell you this at the range/gunshop, but when you do find a place try shooting, bring safetyglasses and hearing protection. If you can, use both the earmuff type noise dampening things and earplugs. Could you get away with just using one? Probably, especially since the .22 pistols aren't that loud (compared to some of the bigger guns out there). On the other hand, its very possible that something else might be shooting something bigger and louder.

I can't say this enough, use ear and eye protection.

OK, rant over.

Let us know what you do decide on, and how it all goes. Good Luck!

On every range there is a guy (or gal) shooting 7 yard groups the size of a trash can lid and flinching with every shot. Don't be that guy (or gal)... There is a name for those people, that name is: "People who didn't start with a .22".

Actually, I prefer to be refered to as "the guy who's first handgun was an Airweight J-Frame" :D

Chris "the Kayak-Man" Johnson

blume357@bellsouth.net
February 24, 2011, 04:42 PM
As above, find a good course.. probably a basic handgun course from an NRA instructor would be best... but often you can find a woman's only course in many areas if you would be more comfortable with that.

Sadly, after you take the class you will be so much better informed and trained than the average male gun owner it is scary.

ForumSurfer
February 24, 2011, 04:47 PM
Between the cost of the ammo and the low recoil, a .22 is the most cost efficient and effective way to get into shooting.

Given today's economy, I can agree with that. A 22 (or a 22 conversion) is great aide in becoming efficient.

However, you don't need to start with a 22 if one doesn't want too. I started out on 38/357 revolvers and 1911 45's. With some proper instruction and lots of practice, it doesn't matter what caliber you choose so long as you can make whatever weapon system you choos work.

Uteridge
February 24, 2011, 05:04 PM
Just about any gun is fine to learn on as long as you are not shooting a gun that is small for the caliber. I taught my little sister on a 9mm XD service model, I taught my wife on a 6 inch .357 loaded up with .38 specials and I have taught several of my wife's friends with a 9mm Beretta 92 (as well as countless Marines on the Beretta). A .38 is a great gun to learn on but if you try to learn on a 2 inch snubnose you will probably not shoot very much because it isn't much fun. A .22 is good but depending on what you intend to use it for is not adequate to be the only gun you own. If you are new to shooting and only plan on getting one gun you should go with a medium sized (K Frame or larger) .38 or a Compact or larger 9mm (not a subcompact). I learned to shoot on a .45 Government Model 1911 when I was very young but a full sized steel frame 1911 is enough to tame the .45 so it was not a bad gun to learn on. I would never hand a new shooter a subcompact .45 or .40 and expect them to enjoy shooting because they don't know how to control recoil yet.

Jim Watson
February 24, 2011, 05:18 PM
There are some restrictive gun laws in Connecticut.
See the NRA summary at:
http://www.nraila.org/statelawpdfs/CTSL.pdf

Don't be intimidated; I have shot at the national championship level with a 13 year old girl, our club pharmacist's daughter, and she was right in there with the big hairy men.

danprkr
February 24, 2011, 06:34 PM
You might also try:
www.corneredcat.com

and if you're in TX look up:

http://www.facebook.com/warriorineverywomancentraltexas

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Packing-In-Pink/76448905205

http://www.facebook.com/DIVAWOW

Even if you're not in TX I'm betting that they'll be happy to help you if they have an referrals in your area.

Good luck, and happy shooting.

Arkansas Paul
February 24, 2011, 06:48 PM
Welcome aboard.
As has been said before, don't let someone convince you to buy a certain gun. Handle several and see what feels right to you. After you've become familiar with them, you could always fire a few at a range. Most rent firearms so you will know for sure whether or not you like them. Get what's comfortable to you.

bannockburn
February 24, 2011, 06:53 PM
Illyria

Welcome to THR. New members are always welcome here.

A number of years ago I taught my then 16 year old sister how to shoot semi-autos in one range session.

Before we even went to the range I had her read several informational and firearms safety books that I had from the NRA. I reviewed the material with her and made sure she understood everything that was covered in them.

Then I went over all the various aspects of the pistols she would be using, including how to handle malfunctions like failure to feed or failure to eject. I started her out with a .22LR target pistol, then a M1911 in 9mm., and finally finished with a SIG P220 in .45ACP. With each gun she used, I watched her progress and waited until she told me she was ready to move up to the next caliber gun.

She liked the .22 the best, was quite good with the 9mm., and shot her best groups with the .45. Since then I have started my teenage daughter out the same way, though for now her .22 is still her favorite.

Furncliff
February 24, 2011, 06:53 PM
I'd link to add a link for you to visit. It's dedicated to women and shooting.

http://www.corneredcat.com/


Please don't desert us afterward:) We need all the feminine input we can get.

welldoya
February 24, 2011, 07:16 PM
Jim Watson is correct, CT has some very restrictive laws about ownership. Best to be come familiar with them.
I've got a female relative living up there and she said she would have well over $200 in a permit just to carry a gun in her car to the range.

Illyria
February 24, 2011, 09:49 PM
Thanks for all the advice everyone. I found a few places that offer courses for around $120-$200, which I think is pretty reasonable? One of them says they don't book more than 5 people per class, which sounds great to me since I would want at least some personal attention.

I just need to find one that has times that work with my work schedule.

Also, thank you all for being so supportive. This seems like a great community so I will definitely be sticking around and keeping you all updated! I'll also make sure to ask someone about .22 caliber pistols since recoil is definitely a concern for me.

J-Bar
February 24, 2011, 10:35 PM
You may not be interesting in cowboy style shooting, but you will never find a more sympathetic group of shooters for a person wanting to learn how to shoot.

Here is a link to cowboy action shooting clubs in Connecticut. Go to one of their matches. Be honest with them. Tell them you want to find out where you can learn to shoot in your area. There will be women there. Talk to them. They will be tuned into the shops in your area that will serve your needs. You will find cowboy action shooters are interested in all kinds of guns, so you will learn a lot from these folks.

This same link can be used to find clubs in neighboring states, in case they are closer to you.

Don't buy anything until you have been trained and shot a variety of guns.

Then join the NRA so we can all continue to enjoy our sport.

http://www.sassnet.com/clubs/Clubs_list.php?state=Connecticut

Uteridge
February 24, 2011, 10:54 PM
J-Bar, great point. I forgot about mentioning cowboy shooters. They are a great bunch to hang around with and if you tell them you don't know how to shoot they will take you under their wings and spend hours teaching you and letting you shoot their guns (if they are anything like Missouri cowboy shooters) That way you can learn free of charge and get to really see what real gun owners are like. There are some shooting sports where people are really competitive and don't like to help young shooters but cowboy shooting is a great place to learn.

J-Bar, do you know Lonesome Ryder or Ivory Jack?

Jim Watson
February 24, 2011, 10:54 PM
I have a couple of informal students myself.
One has had the classes taught by the local PD which are pretty good. I am working to get her up to speed as a competitive shooter with the gun she is most comfortable firing extensively.
The other is signed up for those classes, my main aim is to just familiarize him with his purchased but never shot guns so he can pay attention to a department instructor and not have to worry over the mechanics.

J-Bar
February 24, 2011, 10:58 PM
Uteridge;

Their names are familiar but I don't think I have met them in person...probably conversed with them on the SASS Wire.

franconialocal
February 24, 2011, 11:05 PM
Take the drive up here to NH sometime and I'll take you to the police range with my girlfriend. She is 23 y/o and very slight but she shoots like a pro now having started only about a year ago!! She was very nervous and somewhat timid (like you??) about the whole firearms realm but now she won't get off my back and wants to go shoot all the TIME!!!

Compliments to you on taking the first steps! Don't let the self-professed "experts" get you down or ruin your resolve. If you are serious about your endeavor in this then there are a ton of good reliable people you can turn to.

Uteridge
February 24, 2011, 11:08 PM
Great people. And Lonesome is a fantastic holster maker if you get the occasion to make his acquaintance. I miss Missouri. The Marine Corps had me in California for 3 years and now almost 3 years in Louisiana. Seems like there are not as many normal, sensible people in some other parts of the country.

I am an expert shot and I have still never been to a cowboy meet where I haven't been offered a chance to shoot just about every gun on the range. Cowboy events are the place to go if you want a chance to meet good people and learn a lot about different types of guns.

Don't think if you go to a Cowboy Action event to learn about guns that you will only get a chance to shoot older style guns. There are always lots of people around that have all different types of pistols, rifles, and shotguns on them. Every time I have been to Cowboy Action shooting events in Missouri we had people constantly going off to side ranges to shoot modern weapons and teach new shooters.

Jim Watson
February 24, 2011, 11:13 PM
There are always lots of people around that have all different types of pistols, rifles, and shotguns on them.

And other stuff, too. Like the guy who showed up at the Mississippi River Rangers, Byhalia Miss. with his Thompson and motorcycle scout saddle scabbard. Woo, woo.

Sorry, a little OT there, just showing how diversified you can get in The Gun Culture.

MikeNice
February 24, 2011, 11:34 PM
I have to second the advice to seek out an Instructor. NRA Instructors are usually pretty good.

I also agree with the advice to visit corneredcat.com. You can learn a lot there before you ever touch a gun. I found the advice on finding the gun that fits your hand great. There are also stories and advice directed torwards women specificly.

I also agree that if possble you should start your shooting adventures with a .22lr handgun. The ammo is cheap enough that you can afford to practice the basics. Also, it has very little recoil. That makes it much more comfortable to learn on. You can run through fifty or more rounds without noticing it.

Just as important is to remember to invest in eye protection and ear protection. Even small caliber guns cause hearing damage quickly.

jbr
February 24, 2011, 11:35 PM
Welcome aboard! My $.02. I am with a few of the other guys - start with a handgun class -purchase at least one or two sessions with a shooting instructor so you can learn the mechanics of shooting - stance,trigger pull, aim, etc... it will really speed up the learning curve - start shooting w/ a .22 and shoot a lot for a few weeks. Most ranges rent either the ruger or browning .22's. $10 is the going price where i live. Some want to sell you a brick of ammo to go with it but if you tell them you will be renting for a while for practice and eventual purchase they will usually let you bring your own ammo - either way by only the smallest amount they sell and bring your own for the rest. You can go thru 200-300 rounds with no problem in a short range session - you will be surprised. each 500 rounds fired will run you approx. $80.00 (three range trips- less if two range trips)- repeat - Then when you are completely comfortable rent a large or medium frame 9mm (with a single stack magazine if they have one) or .380 and give it a try - with just one bullet loaded each time until you are comfortable with the recoil. Then load it up and enjoy. Consider the trigger in the gun you buy. It's my most important criteria when considering a purchase. If you like the trigger you can probably shoot it well. Those .22's will spoil you! Good luck!

BullfrogKen
February 24, 2011, 11:41 PM
I thought this series of threads by miss lead, was wonderful. Just FYI really.

Post #9 here . . . . http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7119301#post7119301


So did I. It was a great, in-progress accounting of a gal going from no guns to one she really wanted and enjoyed.


I think that advice about a local NRA First Steps class is a good way to begin the journey. Ask questions from there, and try to find a club where you can find some knowledgeable shooters go to practice. Show up at a practice night/weekend, introduce yourself, and make some friends.


I wouldn't worry too much about being a young girl at a club. The Hunters Education classes at my local club have been 40% middle and high school girls for years now.

Unless you positively know of a really good local gun shop, and a really informed, decent human being working the counter, I wouldn't go blindly into one for help. Might work out, might not. In my experience, mostly it doesn't.

Dave21
February 25, 2011, 05:29 AM
First of all welcome...I'm new too! I've also got a newbie question....I want to start a thread asking for advise on my first buy but have read forums, and threads that were 'remakes' of old threads and people seem to get mad at the person posting a new thread instead of posting on the old ones. I've looked at old threads and don't see any that are particular to my needs. Sorry to steal your thread Illyria, and I give you mad props for joining a predominately male thread and asking for advice....very very cool.

On every range there is a guy (or gal) shooting 7 yard groups the size of a trash can lid and flinching with every shot. Don't be that guy (or gal)... There is a name for those people, that name is: "People who didn't start with a .22".
That was totally me at 18 when I started because I didn't know better. Luckily I'm outgoing and bothered other shooters for advice which they graciously gave me. Now I have shot placement at 25 yards. Thanks for the advice and stay safe!

Illyria
February 25, 2011, 01:40 PM
I know I'm getting way ahead of myself in asking this, but could I possibly go for a gun like the CZ-75B and get the .22 Conversion Kit? That way I could basically have two guns in one for when/if I want to start shooting something other than .22. Good or bad idea?

KodiakBeer
February 25, 2011, 01:57 PM
The CZ has a very long trigger reach, so it will depend on how large your hands are. If you're the petite type, it may not work for you. If you have medium to large hands, buying a CZ with the .22 conversion would be an absolutely great way to start out!

The CZ is one of the best handguns around, in my opinion.

TX1911fan
February 25, 2011, 02:03 PM
The CZ with the 22 conversion kit is a great idea.

Sherri
February 25, 2011, 02:24 PM
I've taken an interest in shooting and reloading over the last year. It's been an interesting trek.

There are some very good beginner videos on the Ruger website: http://ruger.com

Choose NEWS & RESOURCES, then VIDEOS. At the bottom of the screen is a link to BEGINNER SHOOTING TIPS.

Uteridge
February 25, 2011, 02:49 PM
Go to a range that rents guns and give the CZ a try. They sometimes do not work too well for people with small hands but if it is comfortable for you then that would be a great idea.

rfwobbly
February 25, 2011, 02:57 PM
Illyria -
Hi everyone!
Welcome to THR!


Let me first say that I never thought I would be posting in a firearms forum as I have honestly been very afraid of them for most of my life.
This is one of the nicest, most civil places you could ever visit. Beyond the guns, I'd be interested to hear your impression of the help you received. After all, you are the future of our sport.

I know I'm getting way ahead of myself in asking this, but could I possibly go for a gun like the CZ-75B and get the .22 Conversion Kit?
I love CZ guns and in fact own 2. However, since you have not fired the first shot this might be way, way, way ahead of yourself. You're talking about $850 for an unknown. What if gun smoke makes your sinuses go crazy? What if you need your nails re-done after every range session? What if gun ownership compels you to start dressing like Annie Oakley?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2e/Annie-oakley.jpg/220px-Annie-oakley.jpg

I mean the hat is way cool, but the scarf has got to go. :D

The point is, you can buy a used .22 gun at any dealer for $150-$200, shoot it for a year, and trade it in on your CZ (or whatever) and get 80% of your money back on trade-in. That's a much better plan IMHO.

All the best! ;)

mustang_steve
February 25, 2011, 04:14 PM
Welcome to the forums!

Being a woman is not a bad thing when it comes to learning firearms. It's been my experience that women learn how to shoot better than guys.

First, what state are you in? That will determine how easy it will be for you to rent/obtain a firearm. Illinois for example is a very restrictive state, but Florida will let darn near anyone that's not Federally restricted use a firearm. That's a good thing, as the permits required in some states can be annoying and difficult to obtain.

Once that's sorted out, go look for a firearms safety class. Go to a good one that covers semi-automatics and revolvers. It's a good thing to learn both sides of the fence, just in case you find out you like one better than the other.

Once that's done, go hit up a range and see what you can rent. Rentals are a good way to see what calibers, models, etc you like without the hassle of buying, then selling a gun. In the end, the cost of a rental is about equal to the loss from buying and then selling it off, or may even be less than said loss.

Don't be afraid of the gun. Provided it's well maintained and quality ammo is used, much like a car it will only do what you tell it to do and when you tell it to. So long as you carefully follow the techniques and safety practices taught to you in the course and you'll be set.

I do suggest you start with small caliber until you develop a good trigger pull. It makes adapting to large caliber pistols SO much easier. It's one of the things I wished I did.

kayak-man
February 25, 2011, 05:04 PM
Definately try it out first. I've bought a few guns without shooting them, and for the most part they worked out great, but theres a couple purchases that I would have done differently.

Also try out some other ones - you may try out the CZ and find that you really like it, and I hope you do, but there very well could be a Ruger, GLOCK (Its spent in all caps, I'm not emphasizing it) or H&K sitting in the case that fits you even better.

Personally, I'm not a big fan of the conversion kits, buts thats mainly because I'd prefer to have two seperate guns so that if something .... happens... to one I still have the other. Also, I like variety - I want my big guns to feel like big guns and my small guns to feel small. That being said, I think the idea of a conversion kit is great, as you get inexpensive practise with the same gun, and since its all personal preferance, my opinion on the matter is as usefull as a surfboard in Kansas.


rfwobly:
The scarf isn't that bad, but there's no way in this world you'll see me in a hoop skirt!

Well, okay, I guess if it somehow led to me owning an AR-15 I might... or a good FAL.... maybe an M14.... yea, I might be willing to wear a hoop skirt for an M14....and ammo... lots of ammo ... :evil:


Chris "the Kayak-Man" Johnson

Illyria
February 25, 2011, 05:33 PM
Thanks for all the advice again, everyone!

I found a couple options near me in Connecticut. There's a pistol permit class that goes over the basics, safety, etc. with revolvers and semi-automatics near me that I found via the NRA instructor site. It's $130 for the public class or $175 for a private course. Doesn't sound too horrible to me considering the price of things around here (for example, I charge $45/hr for Spanish tutoring - which even to me is totally crazy since I'm originally from Indiana where things are cheaper.)

I really just can't get over how welcoming everyone on here is. It's great to know that there are some sweet, down to earth people in the world willing to lend a hand.

mustang_steve
February 25, 2011, 06:10 PM
Great to hear a fellow Hoosier is on the boards. I grew up in the Fort Wayne area....but now have been a Floridian for some time now.

edit: forgot to mention those prices are pretty reasonable for a comprehensive training program.

BullfrogKen
February 25, 2011, 06:13 PM
Indiana where things are cheaper

Yeah, well welcome to Connecticut.

FROGO207
February 25, 2011, 10:37 PM
Welcome to the community Illyria. Sounds like you have a handle on things already.:cool: I have started all the new shooters (that I have helped learn) on the .22 also. You should be able to find one for a reasonable price when ready. If you look on Gun Broker.com and key in on .22 pistols or .22 revolvers and look at completed auctions this will give you a feel of ACTUAL prices paid, not what the person selling one thinks it is worth. Armed with this info you will be able to get a better deal when you decide to purchase one. Do keep us informed, just think of us all as big brothers and sisters that want to see you succeed.:D

MOHunter1978
February 25, 2011, 10:45 PM
I don't know how it is where you live, but in MO the conservation dept puts on handgun classes for women. The NRA is always a great source for info too.

LKB3rd
February 25, 2011, 10:47 PM
I live in Southern Ct also. North Cove outfitters in Old Saybrook is a good place to go look at some guns, and they run classes for the pistol permit, which you need to buy a handgun in CT. Chris's range in Guilford is also a good place, and he would rent you guns to try out (no permit required to rent).

eta: I see you have it sorted out. That price is in the ballpark unfortunately for the class. It will include range time as well. They'll have you load, fire, and unload/clear both semi auto's and revolvers.

Illyria
February 25, 2011, 10:56 PM
Thanks for the recommendations! If I don't find any place closer to me that rents I'll look there. However, it's a bit far of a drive since I live in Norwalk. I'm glad to see someone else from CT here.

LKB3rd
February 25, 2011, 11:00 PM
There is a shop with a range in Norwalk. I forget the name, but it is right near where rt123 starts at rt 7, between rt 7 and main st. They probably have rentals there.
editing after looking at map.... 4 New Canaan av
http://www.forestandfieldnorwalk.com/

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