Ruger LCR


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grant1265
February 25, 2011, 10:45 PM
Just picked up a NIB Ruger LCR today and will not be able to shoot it for a while. Just want to hear some feedback on this gun and make sure it was a good choice in a snubbie. If you have this gun or have owned it before please give some info on accuracy for what it is and how it is overall.

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Jon Coppenbarger
February 25, 2011, 11:22 PM
have shot the 38 one and only at like 7 yards an it was a accurate and fun revolver. With the 357 out now alot of folks are really buying them.

which one did you buy?

Flint Ridge
February 26, 2011, 12:02 AM
I have the .357 and really like it, though I shoot mostly .38 specials through it.

Nice trigger. While you are waiting to shoot, why not get some snap caps and start getting comfy? I did about 2,000 dryfires (drop of oil each 1,000 per manual) and the trigger is even better - which I did not think possible.

bikemutt
February 26, 2011, 12:24 AM
Great revolver, I love it. .38 special.

Added XS front sight, nice.

Flint Ridge
February 26, 2011, 01:16 AM
+1 on the XS front sight I did that as well

Magnumite
February 26, 2011, 02:07 PM
It's a Ruger, no snap caps required.

shootingthebreeze
February 26, 2011, 02:20 PM
My concern with the Ruger LCR and other "light" revolvers is the stress the revolver is sustaining especially with P+ loads.
There have been failures reported relating to the Ruger LCR already. I'm concerned that aluminum frames just can't take the stress of sustained firing like at a range.

shootingthebreeze
February 26, 2011, 02:23 PM
http://thetruthaboutguns.com/2010/05/robert-farago/ruger-lcr-blows-up/

Just an article relating to an LCR failure.

I'm more in favor of steel all around with revolvers. Yes, it weighs more, but one can get a very nice all steel snub of good quality which can be pretty much invisible for carry purposes.

bikemutt
February 26, 2011, 02:25 PM
I agree the gun may not handle long term stress, especially with +P loads, then again it's really not intended to be a range gun.

I would take mine to the range over say, a root canal. I find it unpleasant to shoot more than half a box through it.

Flint Ridge
February 26, 2011, 03:04 PM
Yes I know I don't have to have snap caps - I've got them and use them.

DPris
February 26, 2011, 03:10 PM
The .38 LCR can easily handle AT LEAST 5000 rounds of +P loads.
At that point, you can expect some minor, but measurable, frame stretching.
Should still be in specs.
Denis

shootingthebreeze
February 26, 2011, 03:16 PM
DPris, I'm still leary of such revolvers- I favor all around steel. Yes, these revolvers are not range guns-however, they need to be exercised at the range initially upon purchase to get used to their feel and so forth. My concern is failure at the wrong time during a defensive situation. Failure can never be predicted, and when I fire a weapon I want to be totally secure in the weapon's performance.
In other words, I don't want a question mark in the back of me head when using it.

bergmen
February 26, 2011, 03:24 PM
http://thetruthaboutguns.com/2010/05/robert-farago/ruger-lcr-blows-up/

Just an article relating to an LCR failure.

I'm more in favor of steel all around with revolvers. Yes, it weighs more, but one can get a very nice all steel snub of good quality which can be pretty much invisible for carry purposes.
Well, in the third sentence they claim that the "LCR is made of “aerospace grade” 7000 series aluminum."

Since there is no such thing as "aerospace grade" aluminum of any type, I become suspect as to their credibility.

Also, they indicate that it was likely fired with the cylinder out of time. Any revolver fired in this manner is subject to at least this amount of damage, maybe more. This can easily be induced by the operator if they are not indexing the cylinder after closure or turning the cylinder during closure.

"It appears that the chamber was not properly aligned with the bore when the round fired, and that the bullet struck the forcing cone out of alignment. The bullet most likely took the path of least resistance, leading to the catastrophic failure of the barrel and frame subassembly."

Dan

shootingthebreeze
February 26, 2011, 03:56 PM
Perhaps I'm old school relating to aluminum frames. I just trust steel.

DPris
February 26, 2011, 04:15 PM
Shoot,
I'm old enough to prefer walnut & steel myself, but I was actually surprised the LCR held up through that high a round count.

I'm not trying to sell you on getting one, your choice entirely, I'm just passing on that the gun can handle AT LEAST that much use.

I think too many people try to make it into a gun that it was never intended to be (as in regular extensive range use), but I agree that a defensive gun does need to be fired at least occasionally.

I wouldn't have any doubts about the LCR with +Ps spread out over several years.

Denis

shootingthebreeze
February 26, 2011, 05:17 PM
Denis, I think that with the Ruger LCR, it would be prudent to shoot .38s at the range for practice initially, and of course occasionally, with a limited P+ just to get the feel for them if one elects to carry P+.
I don't think it's wise to just shoot staright P+ all the time.
After re-reading the post again it seems also that it was operator error, by not making sure the cylinder was properly seated. The article thus is a reminder for all of us to make sure the cylinder is properly seated when closed.

Who knows? Perhaps my rigid thinking may change!! Just that firearm safety for me is really a big deal. I understand that Ruger over engineers their products, the LCR included. But I think that hot loads should not be fired all the time because of wear and tear. The .38 itself is a good defense round. Having the extra strength in construction should be a plus with .38.

DPris
February 26, 2011, 05:32 PM
Shooting with lower-pressure .38s will obviously extend the operational life of the LCR, but even with an exclusive diet of +Ps it'd take several years for most people to reach 5000, if used only occasionally.
For most, I'd expect 5000 rounds to not even be reached.

Ruger put 10,000 rounds (dunno how much was +P, if any) through one & said it began to wear the rifling, but was still shooting.
Given the frame stretching at 5000, I'd expect 10,000 to be at the extreme edge of its lifespan.

But- there's really not much need to be using +P at the range, aside from recoil familiarization.

Denis

Specs
February 26, 2011, 05:34 PM
The KLCR 357 is steel, not aluminum. I have read that it is best to use snap caps with 1, I believe that some have developed trigger reset problems or something when dry fired without caps. They are cheap, why not use them? I do.

grant1265
February 26, 2011, 07:52 PM
I bought the standard lcr with the hogue tamers. .38+P only.

DMZ
February 26, 2011, 07:56 PM
I predict you are going to like it.

grant1265
February 26, 2011, 08:01 PM
Thanks everyone, i actually just took it out to the range today shot about 125-150 rounds with my father and some guys we met at the range. It was unbelievably accurate for the less than 2" bbl. i was hitting bowling pins on a chain consistently from 25yrds with factory magtech, american eagle, and some reload 148gr wadcutters. The two guys there also let me shoot their baby desert eagle 9mm (accurate), romanian ak pistol(very fun by the way), and charter arms 1960's era undercover police i think(couldn't hit anything, but snubbies are always fun). Overall a great day at the range. The trigger on the lcr is the best da i have ever shot.

BruiseLee
February 27, 2011, 10:20 AM
I haven't shot the LCR, but I checked out a bunch at the 2011 SHOT Show. I have to agree it has an excellent double action pull. I told the Ruger rep the action felt like an old Smith & Wesson K frame.

BTW, I also checked out Taurus' similar polymer snubbie revolver. My friend and I agreed it had one of the worst trigger pulls of any gun I've ever handled of any type.

not a pro
February 27, 2011, 01:45 PM
bought one in 38 spl. for the mrs. and she loves it. it'll be her ccw when we take courses this spring.
we've been shooting wadcutters (mostly because the shop owner recommended them).

any reasons why we shouldn't stick with wadcutters?
other recommendations?

Nushif
February 27, 2011, 01:49 PM
I got one when it first came out and it was my second gun I ever bought. That was the .38 variety.

Put a lot of non +P through it, as I never got the tradeoff in shooting speed and comfort as compared to +P.

It held up just fine and worked every time. Good to carry, fun to shoot, and a real conversation piece. What's not to like?

Magnumite
February 27, 2011, 02:23 PM
That LCR failure was most likely a barrel obstruction from a squib load. Any good DA revolver will properly index the cylinder no matter how it is closed. It is a function of the hand and extractor star timing. It cannot fire without the cylinder fully in battery because of the cylinder bolt interlock. The frame failure is unlikely because that would have been cumulative over a high round count, and the amount out of time caused by frame stretch would be negligible, the forcing cone would compensate for that. Furthermore, if the cylinder would have been that severely misaligned, the highest pressure would have been in the cylinder, with the cylinder showing signs of overpressure and impending/catastrophic failure.

I tried this on my own LCR and over decades of working with my own revolvers. A revolver in good repair will not misalign that severely.

Magnumite
February 27, 2011, 02:26 PM
About the shootability of it, my experience has been you'll feel the majority of the recoil in the center of the palm of the strong hand. It's not gentle. But there is not a great deal of muzzle flip. Ruger worked that gun very well for recoil management.

DPris
February 27, 2011, 02:34 PM
My experience was that it tore skin from the base of my thumb in a conventional hold, then tore the glove I used after that. :)
Denis

bergmen
February 27, 2011, 03:25 PM
That LCR failure was most likely a barrel obstruction from a squib load. Any good DA revolver will properly index the cylinder no matter how it is closed. It is a function of the hand and extractor star timing. It cannot fire With the cylinder fully in battery because of the cylinder bolt interlock. The frame failure is unlikely because that would be cumulative over a high round count, and the amount out of time caused be frame stretch would be negligable, the forcing cone would compensate for that. Furthermore, if the cylinder would have been that severely misaligned, the highest pressure would have been in the cylinder, with the cylinder showing signs of overpressure and impending/catastrophic failure.

I tried this on my own LCR and over decades of working with my own revolvers. A revolver in good repair will not misalign that severely.
The LCR (and any DA revolver) can easily be fired out of time. Try it and you will see.

1) Swing out the cylinder and confirm it is unloaded.
2) Close the cylinder and index it.
3) Begin a DA trigger pull and manually rotate the cylinder past the point where the cylinder lock engages, placing the cylinder out of time and the hammer will fall.

I'm probably not using the proper terminology but it is simple to cause this situation. I just did this about ten times on my LCR. Does the same thing on my 442 Airweight.

This CAN be caused by a rotational jerking of the strong hand while initiating a DA trigger pull. It has to be done just right, but it can be done.

I had a Super Single Six fire out of time once with a .22 magnum round. It sheared the bullet in half and peppered the web between my thumb and forefinger with powder bits and brass shards. It didn't damage the gun but I was able to induce this several times after the event.

It is for this reason that I religiously index the cylinder upon closure (DA and SA) and keep from rotational jerking during cocking (SA) or firing (DA).

I can post a video of the LCR out-of-time firing if anybody wants to see it.

Dan

shootingthebreeze
February 27, 2011, 04:32 PM
Ok Bergmen, let me clarify, because what you wrote is very very important:

1-You load the cylinder pointing the weapon downrange.
2-You close the cylinder.
3-Then, you rotate the cylinder until it seats. Is that what you mean?
4-Aim, squeeze the trigger.

Now this is what I don't understand: If the cylinder is fully seated and the trigger is squeezed, the hammer should fall onto the primer of the cartridge which should be fully seated in battery.

Thus by indexing (which I think you mean making sure the cylinder is seated manually) and keeping the weapon upright and steady upon squeezing the trigger should avoid the problem you just stated.

I think this is critical for anyone reading this and any comments are welcome.

bergmen
February 27, 2011, 07:18 PM
Ok Bergmen, let me clarify, because what you wrote is very very important:

1-You load the cylinder pointing the weapon downrange.
2-You close the cylinder.
3-Then, you rotate the cylinder until it seats. Is that what you mean?
4-Aim, squeeze the trigger.

Now this is what I don't understand: If the cylinder is fully seated and the trigger is squeezed, the hammer should fall onto the primer of the cartridge which should be fully seated in battery.

Thus by indexing (which I think you mean making sure the cylinder is seated manually) and keeping the weapon upright and steady upon squeezing the trigger should avoid the problem you just stated.

I think this is critical for anyone reading this and any comments are welcome.
Okay, let me see if I can explain this better (I probably didn't explain it very well above).

Start with the revolver unloaded, cylinder closed and cylinder indexed properly (cylinder latch engaged and cylinder locked in battery).

Start the DA pull just enough to retract the cylinder latch, freeing the cylinder to rotate.

While continuing to slowly pull the trigger rearward, rotate the cylinder until it is just past the next chamber that would align if allowed to go into battery naturally.

Continue the DA pull, the pawl will not engage the cylinder, the cylinder will stay where it is and the hammer will fall with the cylinder out of time.

If you want, I'll make a video of what I'm doing and it will be crystal clear. This is really easy to induce, I worry about it all the time and double check cylinder "in battery" state constantly.

In addition to what I am describing here, I had a very scary issue with my .357 Magnum Blackhawk. The cylinder latch is pushed into position by a small coil spring pushing a small rounded head hollow pin upward on the cylinder latch. On my particular revolver, the hollow pin was sticking in the bore and not allowing the spring to push it upward to engage the cylinder latch. I noticed this during a normal practice session when I cocked the gun and the cylinder kept rotating a bit out of battery. Had I fired, it would have been a few degrees out of time and the gun could very well have blown up. Cold sweat time.

I confirmed what was going on, could see the cylinder latch not being pushed upward and stopped the session. When I got home, I disassembled and found a rough bore where the hollow pin was sticking. I polished it with a cut-down Q-tip and some Semi-Chrome polish, cleaned it up, lubricated it and tested it. It worked fine for the rest of the time I owned the gun.

As I said, I can make a video of the LCR timing issue (also, like I mentioned above, my 442 does the exact same thing). I can easily induce this on any of my single actions also. The drill is different with the SA revolvers, one has to draw the hammer back slowly while rotating the cylinder in the same manner as the DA above.

Give it a try and with a bit of practice you will see exactly what I mean. It might shock you a bit.

Dan

Magnumite
February 28, 2011, 12:29 AM
bergman, I have tried this several times and cannot duplicate it. The only way to do that is if the hand a) rides up OVER the ejector star or b) stalls on the point of the star, in which case the cylinder will not turn further nor will the trigger continue to move rearward. My revolverS do not do either of those. Additionally, any position that cylinder is in results in rotation of the cylinder and barrel/chamber alignment. I have close to 20K rounds through my Redhawk, much of it fast DA and it cannot be induced to this type of malfuction.

As a matter of fact, I use your method to check for dragging from debris under the ejector using the very method you mention. If someone starts a DA pull quickly then stops, they can actually cause the cylinder to rotate so that chamber is aligned with the barrel. If they continue the trigger pull, the hand is moving up parallel to the ejector star "cocking" surface and ends up where it would normally be if fired normally. If the it is a S&W and the bolt does not pop up early like a Ruger, the hand simply pics up on the next chamber and alignment is maintained.

I'd have to see a video. Now my caveat is "on a properly working DA revolver". The only revolvers I've ever seen fire out of battery like that are way lower end revolvers, no where near the class of Ruger, S&W and Colt.

The debate continues... :)

bergmen
February 28, 2011, 10:59 PM
I am out of town on a business trip right now so I'm not equipped to do a video and post it.

When I get back home (Wednesday likely) I will shoot a video of both a DA and SA revolver demonstraing what I am describing here.

The scary part for me is the cylinder should be in complete control by the pawl and cylinder latch under all circumstances in order to prevent the situation I am describing. It is not, and I will show you how.

When you see my video, I guarantee you will be shocked. I was and still am, that is why I am extremely vigilant concerning cylinder idexing upon closure and confirming proper latching before firing.

So, as soon as I arrive home I will shoot and post the video.

Stay tuned...

Dan

dayid
February 28, 2011, 11:18 PM
It sounds like bergman is saying to start a rotation of the cylinder by pulling the trigger - then with your other hand - grab the cylinder and put it out of time (at least, when he says 'now manually rotate the cylinder' that's what it sounds like).

bergman, am I right?

If so, why the heck would anyone grab the cylinder and bring it out of time when shooting?

bergmen
March 1, 2011, 12:24 AM
It sounds like bergman is saying to start a rotation of the cylinder by pulling the trigger - then with your other hand - grab the cylinder and put it out of time (at least, when he says 'now manually rotate the cylinder' that's what it sounds like).

bergman, am I right?

If so, why the heck would anyone grab the cylinder and bring it out of time when shooting?
Yes, you are correct. The issue is that it is possible to fire out of time by manipulating the cylinder OR by a rotational jerking action while initiating a DA pull.

Like I said earlier, I have had an out of time firing on an SA Super Single Six. This must have been induced by something I was not aware of at the time, I have no idea what happened or how it occured. All I now is it sprayed my hand with brass bits and powder and it hurt like heck.

As soon as I can post a video, you will see what I'm talking about. It may not be anything to worry about but it is certainly important to realize that it CAN happen.

Also, in this link: http://thetruthaboutguns.com/2010/05...-lcr-blows-up/

there is a suggestion that an out of time firing caused this. I am maintaining that it is certainly possible.

So, stay tuned...

Dan

dayid
March 1, 2011, 12:37 AM
Even rotating my LCR out of timing (which, again, it something that I see no reason to ever want to do) - it will not drop the firing pin until the timing is correct.

Forcing a gun out of timing isn't so surprising. That's like saying you can cause any semi-automatic to fail by pushing the slide out of battery :rolleyes:

qcsmitty
March 1, 2011, 06:08 PM
Dry firing the LCR and any other DA Ruger revolvers is ok. No need for snap caps.

India
March 1, 2011, 09:08 PM
I have one, and it's about to read I had one :( I am fine with the .38 specials, but I can't stand the 357's in it :( I really really tried!! I've only had this little Ruger for 2 weeks, but I'm about to take it and trade it in. It physically hurt when using the 357's, so with it being purchased as a ccw and my dislike for it, it's just not going to be a working relationship. I wish you all the luck with it and I hope that you can enjoy it :)

Magnumite
March 1, 2011, 10:39 PM
Just shoot 38's in that new Ruger, india.

bergman, I did just that. Pull the trigger a little, enough to drop the bolt, the rotate the cylinder. On all my revolvers they fire in battery only.

We'll watch your video when you get back.

shootingthebreeze
March 2, 2011, 10:52 AM
India, you can only shoot .38 and .38+P in the Ruger LCR NOT .357!

Please read the manual and do not shoot .357 you can ruin the weapon and possibly have it blow apart.

With the Ruger LCR, it's better to shoot .38 at the range and occasionally .38 +P

shootingthebreeze
March 2, 2011, 11:15 AM
Having weighed many things and looked into many small firearms extensively I am leaning towards the Ruger LCR versus the Kahr P380.
Revolvers are simple. Simple to use, simple to clean. I have always been partial to revolvers anyway-I have a Rossi .38/.357 stainless snub and it has worked flawlessly since 1997-and it's very accurate.
I have checked the Ruger LCR recently and Ruger has over engineered this weapon. It's a fine, small revolver which can also be quite invisible during the summer months.
Nothing against semi autos-I have two which I like a lot. I am impressed with the Ruger LCR and the care Ruger puts into them. For one, the cylinder, which is small, is made of highly purified steel making it one of the strongest cylinders around. I'm not surprised that India's weapon did not blow apart above - and again, the Ruger LCR only uses .38 and .38+P so just because the cylinder is excellent don't use anything higher than .38+P!!!

redbullitt
March 2, 2011, 01:06 PM
I like mine. Maybe have 500 rounds through it.

I did add the bright green sight to the front. Much easier to see than the one it came with. Easy install and still shoots to where I point.

I think it is important to note that it is a pocket carry gun. It simply will not get fired like a 9mm glock, so for me the 5k or 10k number is irrelevant. It is not exactly pleasant to shoot an extended range session with it lol. BUT it is very pleasant to carry every day. For practice I load up standard or other mild loads. It is much more friendly to fire this way, but I make sure to stay up on the recoil with some +p ones as well.

It has a surprisingly great trigger for sure.

For accuracy coffee cans and milk jugs at 25 yards are very fair game. Havent really done any official accuracy testing. It has done everything I have asked of it so far.

DPris
March 2, 2011, 01:28 PM
Shooting,
Are you not aware the LCR is made in two versions, one a .38 & the other a .357?
Denis

shootingthebreeze
March 2, 2011, 02:30 PM
No I did not I thought it was the .38 and .38+P; learn something every day!

Specs
March 2, 2011, 06:05 PM
The 38 spec+p is so marked and so is the 357 mag. I don't think you could put 357 mag in the 38 spec. It won't fit.

Jon Coppenbarger
March 2, 2011, 06:15 PM
did you all know that if you put a obstruction in the barrel and you pull the trigger with a live round it can cause damage to your revolver!

bergmen
March 3, 2011, 06:05 PM
Just shoot 38's in that new Ruger, india.

bergman, I did just that. Pull the trigger a little, enough to drop the bolt, the rotate the cylinder. On all my revolvers they fire in battery only.

We'll watch your video when you get back.
Okay, I recorded and uploaded the video this morning:

http://good-times.webshots.com/video/3009868140053667879lwWugB

I start by opening the cylinder to check that the gun is unloaded.

I then close the cylinder and index it (bringing it into battery).

When I start the DA pull, there is a point in the sequence where the cylinder can be rotated at will, out of the direct control of the pawl or cylinder lock.

I rotate the cylinder to a point past the next chamber in sequence and the hammer will fall as though it were in battery, and it will do so out of time.

I then rotate the cylinder back to an in-battery state (cylinder lock latched). There is audio with the video so you can hear the various states of the sequence.

I am showing this only to indicate that it is possible but highly unlikely that a revolver can fire out of time. Other forces can influence the cylinder's position such as a sudden jerking motion during the DA pull (a loaded cylinder will have much more inertia and can be made to rotate much easier than an empty cylinder).

Check the video out and see if it is clear. If not, I can reshoot it while vocally describing what I am doing.

Dan

shootingthebreeze
March 4, 2011, 11:09 AM
I just don't understand why one would manipulate the cylinder while squeezing the trigger. It's just something I would never do while firing.

bergmen
March 4, 2011, 12:10 PM
I just don't understand why one would manipulate the cylinder while squeezing the trigger. It's just something I would never do while firing.
I am only showing that it can be done. I am not indicating that someone would intentionally do what I am demonstrating, only that it is possible for the gun to actually fire out of time (which was the original purpose of this demonstration).

Dan

shootingthebreeze
March 4, 2011, 01:53 PM
Probably that demonstration could be duplicated in other revolvers as well I don't know- yet, I would say that handling the cylinder during trigger squeezing could (and I just say could) cause eventually some problems with the internal mechanisms and so I would not suggest to do this ever even as this demonstration shows.
The revolver is designed extremely well and what I like about it is its simplicity. Probably it would help to have a gun smith check a revolver periodically after so many rounds fired. I actually trust revolvers because of how reliable they are time after time.

Poper
March 5, 2011, 02:44 PM
Bergman,
I watched your video.
It appears the hammer fell with the cylinder turned far enough for the firing pin to miss the primer.

Anybody know how far out of time can the cylinder be and still result in a primer strike?

Zip

bergmen
March 5, 2011, 09:16 PM
Bergman,
I watched your video.
It appears the hammer fell with the cylinder turned far enough for the firing pin to miss the primer.

Anybody know how far out of time can the cylinder be and still result in a primer strike?

Zip
Yes, potentially (cylinder turned far enough for the firing pin to miss the primer). I would think that the only way an out-of-time firing could occur is if the cylinder is only a few degrees out of battery, otherwise it would miss the "hot spot" on the primer so to speak.

I have always wondered about this. In my one experience (noted above) with the .22 Magnum out-of-time firing, the bullet was sheared almost in half which would suggest a cylinder position a fairly significant distance out of battery. I have no idea how the firing pin could possibly have hit the rim with sufficient force to set off the round. This was a real head scratcher.

Dan

Sleipnir
March 5, 2011, 09:24 PM
I cannot replicate the out of battery condition in my Ruger SP101, at the point where your LCR fires out of battery my SP101's cylinder rotates into full battery lockup.

shootingthebreeze
March 6, 2011, 09:10 AM
India, I have seen the .357 model just yesterday. I did not know that the LCR came in the .357 model.
It is slightly heavier than the .38 but I can see where you have difficulty with the punishing .357 load.
If I decided with the Ruger LCR I would stick with the .38 and .38+P model. The .38+P has about the same punch as a .40. However I probably would stick with .38 rounds just for accuracy sake.
Though the .357 is heavier as stated, I still think it is too "light" for .357 loads.
I would ask if you can shoot .38+P loads before trading it in. It's a nice firearm. That might be an option for you.

DPris
March 6, 2011, 02:51 PM
Ask if you can shoot .38+P loads before trading it in?
Why?
Denis

shootingthebreeze
March 6, 2011, 03:03 PM
DPris, I'm just thinking of the heavier construction the .357 model offers. Though still lighter than your average .357, offering nice concealed outlines, its construction to me seems sturdier if one was shooting .38+P loads and, if .357 used, India would still have that option.
But it's up to India-both models are nice-and again, Ruger over engineered each; the cylinder is made of highly purified steel. I'm impressed with how they look and feel.

Specs
March 6, 2011, 03:05 PM
38+p is a nice soft shooting round in the 357 LCR. It's also not a bad SD round. The extra weight and Hogue grip on the 357 makes for a light recoil in 38 or 38+p. I just ordered a case of tmj 38 spec +p for target. I carry 357 magnum for SD in mine, but do not shoot it for fun.

shootingthebreeze
March 6, 2011, 07:20 PM
Thanks, Specs, good information. Based on what you wrote, the little extra weight of the .357 Ruger LCR makes for a softer recoil with .38 and .38+P, thus, increasing control, and accuracy.
That's what came to me when I examined the .357.

About a 4 ounce difference between the two.

India
March 7, 2011, 10:56 PM
We did end up keeping it, the dealer didn't want to give us anything for it. Ended up buying an FN 5.7, don't know if it is something I want to carry due to the size. .38's in this little ruger are doable :). I'm just going to have to take all the hand guns to the firing line, fire them all and then choose!

Specs
March 8, 2011, 08:22 AM
If nothing else, the Ruger would make a great car gun. It's stainless, and it's completely reliable. I plan to use mine in my truck if I find a 9mm pocket pistol.

shootingthebreeze
March 8, 2011, 10:59 AM
India, the Ruger LCR .357 would make a nice carry firearm. When compared to the .38, their sizes are remarkably the same!

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