Use by date on ammo?


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Steve H
February 27, 2011, 12:24 PM
I have never seen ammo that has a "use by date" until this. Anyone understand why this has use by date?

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TexasRifleman
February 27, 2011, 12:26 PM
As I understand it, and I may be completely wrong, the "BallistiClean" uses a lead free primer compound that has a shorter shelf life than normal primers. That's why the ammo is supposedly "non-toxic".

I have always suspected this is where the urban legend of "the government requiring ammo that goes bad" came from.

esheato
February 27, 2011, 12:26 PM
News to me...

Ske1etor
February 27, 2011, 12:27 PM
Primers degrade over time, not sure if that's why they put that on there though.

Sky
February 27, 2011, 12:29 PM
All the above and maybe a marketing plan on quicker turn over?

Mt Shooter
February 27, 2011, 12:30 PM
I see it is way over the use by date, perhaps you should send it me for proper disposal.

Wildbillz
February 27, 2011, 12:31 PM
Have you tried firing any of it?

WB

Steve H
February 27, 2011, 12:33 PM
Have you tried firing any of it?

Not mine, just saw the pic on the internet.

azranger
February 27, 2011, 06:33 PM
I currently have ammo that I have put the date I bought it on the box, and some of it's dated in the mid 90"s. I shot some last week at the range with no notice of deterioration(I am only talking factory ammo here):o

rice paddy daddy
February 27, 2011, 06:39 PM
In the 1980's I was firing M2 Ball, dated 1918, in my Garand and Model 1917. no problems.

Animal Mother
February 27, 2011, 07:54 PM
As I understand it, and I may be completely wrong, the "BallistiClean" uses a lead free primer compound that has a shorter shelf life than normal primers. That's why the ammo is supposedly "non-toxic".


BINGO.

Lead-free primers have a very short shelf life compared to non-lead free primers. I've shot ammunition loaded back in the 1940s with no issues, but from what I understand, lead free primers can become unreliable after just a few years.

Larry E
February 27, 2011, 09:22 PM
I've fired Canadian 9 mm military surplus ammo loaded in the early 1940's in the late 1980's or early '90's, and it all fired just fine. The only problem with old ammunition is that case necks can age harden and can crack/split on firing.

The no lead primers are less stable than either the old corrosive primers or modern non-corrosive lead based primers.

jscott
February 27, 2011, 09:34 PM
I currently have ammo that I have put the date I bought it on the box, and some of it's dated in the mid 90"s. I shot some last week at the range with no notice of deterioration(I am only talking factory ammo here)

Mid 90's. :eek: Wow, my ammo is lucky to last 2 weeks. I've even got my 3 year old pulling the lever on the reloader to keep up.

DoubleTapDrew
February 27, 2011, 09:42 PM
Sounds like their lawyers got involved to protect them from legal recourse for a consumer who doesn't shoot it by that date.

FROGO207
February 27, 2011, 11:03 PM
MY ammo expires on the day I shoot it.:D Seriously I have some 45 ACP that the box shows from the 1920's and 3 rounds fired OK for me last year. I did save the rest of the box and the empty casings.

Hatterasguy
February 27, 2011, 11:25 PM
Wow that sucks I expect ammo properly stored to last at least 50 years, if not longer. The Russian spam cans full of good old highly corrosive ammo will probably keep for 100+ years!:D

Caliper_RWVA
February 27, 2011, 11:27 PM
In the 1980's I was firing M2 Ball, dated 1918, in my Garand and Model 1917. no problems.
Hmmm, I was going to say that I just shot some Bulgarian surplus with a 1955 headstanp from my M38, but you've got me beat...

Hypnogator
February 27, 2011, 11:46 PM
In the 1980's I was firing M2 Ball, dated 1918, in my Garand and Model 1917. no problems.

Err, no -- you may have shot .30-06 rounds dated 1918, but the M2 Ball cartridge was not developed until 1938. :uhoh:

xcgates
February 28, 2011, 02:41 AM
Ahh, lead-free "safety" concerns rise up again. I remember trying to deal with that lead-free solder junk. For crying out loud, removing lead from everything causes more headaches than it is worth, IMO.

Sav .250
February 28, 2011, 11:51 AM
If the ammo goes"bang", then all is good. :)

MilitisDeii
February 28, 2011, 12:20 PM
I was able to set off primers
of cartridges which were manufactured
in the 1930s and put in a lake long ago.

After some drying up even the powder did burn.

It was amazing, I really did not expect that.

I would assume that well stored ammo can
last literally forever but surely much longer than
a human life span.

x_wrench
February 28, 2011, 10:44 PM
most of what i shoot are reloads that i make. most of it never sits on the shelf for more than a year. if i make something up (like special accuracy loads for hunting), i will seal both the bullet and the primer so no air can get inside of the brass. all of my long term ammo, sets in military surplus ammo cans with good seals on them. 30-06 shells that were made in the 40's are still being shot today that were stored in ammo cans. at my age, if it lasts another 20 years, it will probably last longer than i will.

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