What is the difference between a .243 and 30-30?


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Tough Guns
March 3, 2011, 12:39 AM
as far as ammo, distance, and recoil? what can ya shoot with a .243 that you cannot with a 30-30? which one has more power? thanks

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lizziedog1
March 3, 2011, 12:42 AM
what can ya shoot with a .243 that you cannot with a 30-30?

nothing!

Tough Guns
March 3, 2011, 12:48 AM
then why are there different names for them like that?

The Lone Haranguer
March 3, 2011, 01:07 AM
Other than being developed by Winchester, the cartridges have nothing in common. .243 Winchester (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.243_Winchester) .30-30 Winchester (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.30-30_Winchester)

ReadyontheRight
March 3, 2011, 01:16 AM
Flat shooting?

shiftyer1
March 3, 2011, 01:38 AM
So if they have nothing in common what are the differences? I was seriously in the market for a .243 but never thought to compare it to a 30-30

memphisjim
March 3, 2011, 01:43 AM
30-30 bigger and slower probably better penetration 150-250 yard
243 lighter can hit 4000fps with the right load increased range

shiftyer1
March 3, 2011, 01:51 AM
How about at 100 yards? Are they neck and neck as far as accuracy at that distance? Also how does the recoil compare?

evan price
March 3, 2011, 02:00 AM
243 will shoot lighter bullets at higher speeds for a flatter trajectory. 30-30 will shoot heavier bullets but with more drop over distance due to the lower speed of the 30 caliber. It's really a matter of ballistics. I suggest you study up on ballistics and calibers.

memphisjim
March 3, 2011, 02:04 AM
at 100yards 30-30 probably penetrates better with less noise

Tough Guns
March 3, 2011, 02:07 AM
whats the recoil difference?

shiftyer1
March 3, 2011, 02:19 AM
I've tried looking up the ballistics but to be honest....it makes more sense to me in english not numbers. Thats why I like some of these threads, when folks that already have an informed opinion share their knowledge and explain it in plain english, I can learn something new. Thanx :)

Davek1977
March 3, 2011, 02:39 AM
My take on things is that the 30-30 and .243 have roughly the same amount of felt recoil, but are suited best for different tasks. I grew up shooting both. The .243 is a decent medium/small game round out to about 300-400 yards. The 30-30 is a good deer round, but better served in hunting brushy areas where shots aren't likely to be over 150 yards. Recoil is far from severe with either, and many young hunters start out on either caliber.

shiftyer1
March 3, 2011, 02:55 AM
So basically the 30-30 is a medium sized game gun out to ?150 yards and with the right load, so is the .243 BUT a .243 is also a coyote getter out to 200-300 yards? So it's a little more versatile? I'm not trying to knock 30-30, I own one and love it. Just comparing, I haven't seen a very wide selection of 30-30 rounds. The .243 seems to have more variety

memphisjim
March 3, 2011, 03:02 AM
pretty fair assessment

jeffmack
March 3, 2011, 03:05 AM
30-30's are often used in lever actions with tubular magazines. This means they (usually) need a round nose, because a pointy nose might strike the primer of a cartridge in front of it in a tube, causing a catastrophe.

Lever guns have good follow up shots, but the round nose bullet usually makes for a slow moving, closer range gun. 30-30's are great for deer and pigs in brush. Some even hunt black bear with them.

.243 has pointy bullets, usually fired from a bolt action. The pointy bullet moves faster, allows for less drop, which makes them more appropriate for longer distances than 30-30 (usually).

natman
March 3, 2011, 03:08 AM
http://www.amazon.com/American-Ammunition-Ballistics-Edward-Matunas/dp/083292900X

http://www.amazon.com/Popular-sporting-rifle-cartridges-Harvey/dp/0910676747

Try and find a copy of one or both of these books. Popular Sporting Rifle Cartridges is especially good at explaining in words what various cartridges are for.

Unfortunately, it was a while ago when I needed information at this level, so both are now out of print, so you'll have to find a used copy.

Cryogaijin
March 3, 2011, 03:48 AM
Go with the .243. It is a more flexible cart, and far more modern. It is far more useful for hunting varmints than the 30-30, though the 30-30 is a >little< bit better on heavier game.

Even so, I'd actually consider something in between. The .260 remington, 7x57 mauser, 7mm-08 or the like. Fairly similar recoil to the .243, better on heavier game.

I loved my 7x57, (Custom rem 700 mountain rifle. Came in under 6lbs before the scope. Too bad my dad pawned it.) It would be my go-to rifle these days, if I still owned it.

That said. . . well. . . 30-06 is awesome. :)

lizziedog1
March 3, 2011, 07:30 AM
Cartridges Of The World is another good reference book.

Please don't get too focused on names and numbers. All cartridges are designed to do exactly the same thing, launch a projectile. Some launch large ones at slower velocities, some launch smaller ones at higher velocities.

It takes time to get all this down.

The 243 or the 30-30 will both take deer. Remember, deer are made of flesh and blood. It doen't take a magnum or super duper caliber to kill a skinny little whitetail.

243winxb
March 3, 2011, 08:59 AM
what can ya shoot with a .243 that you cannot with a 30-30? Wood chucks at 400+ yards. The high velocity of the 243 will drop a deer faster that a 30-30 with a 150 or 170 gr bullet at any range. http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=558629

lizziedog1
March 4, 2011, 07:52 AM
The high velocity of the 243 will drop a deer faster that a 30-30 with a 150 or 170

Oh, really!!!:confused:

If you were in the woods and looked up to see an angry bear quickly closing ground on you, which would you rather have? Granted, something even bigger would be better. But between the .243 and .30-30, no brainer.

DPStx
March 4, 2011, 08:43 AM
The main difference between the 2 is in the ballistics. The 30-30 has the power to drop a deer at longer ranges than it's typically used, but it gets more difficult to hit them well because the bullet starts to drop pretty fast. 243 shoots about 1000fps faster and has much higher ballistic coefficient which means it starts faster and holds onto its velocity much longer. This means that it shoots flatter and retains "killing power" longer.

I shot my first deer with a Win 94 30-30, and every one since then with my Win 70 243. Both are a fun to shoot...

DPSTX

BrocLuno
March 4, 2011, 08:46 AM
They impact the critter differently. 30-30 flat nosed Winchester Silver Tip will start expansion as soon as it touches something (thwack) that you can hear and it will deliver that energy quickly. That why it has worked for 100 years or so. It actually performs better than the numbers would indicate. 243 hits faster and builds a progressive wound channel. May, or may not, be able to break bone and can come apart. However, it also works well on small to medium sized game and has more effective point blank range. Both good, just typical trade-offs as to what they do.

Abel
March 4, 2011, 08:59 AM
30-30 ammo is cheaper.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
March 4, 2011, 09:00 AM
.243 and 30-30 combinations of numbers are all different! Also, the .243 begins with a decimal point, 30-30 has a hyphen and .243 doesn't!

Old Time Hunter
March 4, 2011, 09:05 AM
30-30 ammo is cheaper.
Much cheaper!

I know for where I do most of my hunting, the .30-30 is the better cartridge. Just don't shoot prairie dogs or squirrels with the .30-30, 'cause if you do, there ain't noth'n left of 'em.

243winxb
March 4, 2011, 09:43 AM
Winchester Model 94, the most accidental discharge prone guns ever made. :uhoh: :D http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=385433

Old Time Hunter
March 4, 2011, 11:27 AM
Winchester Model 94, the most accidental discharge prone guns ever made. :uhoh: :D http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=385433
Read your link and you were the only one making claims as to the "most accidental discharge" in relationship to the Winchester '94. Do not think your unsubstantiated claims would hold much water in a court of law. Especially if you used the basic statistical PPM that industry, government, and lawyers use to illustrate culpability beyond industry standards. Cosmoline covered it better than I could, but it appears you are one man band with your vendetta against the Winchester '94....by the way, how many idiots(they must be since it is so, so unsafe) have purchased them during the rifles life span? Betcha the PPM is one of the lowest in the industry.

jbr
March 4, 2011, 11:37 AM
I love hunting game - hate chasing it. I stopped using my 30-30 for anything over 100-125 yards. I like a bullet that passes thru the animal thus leaves a good blood trail. 30-06 is still one heck of a verstile gun with plenty of knockdown power. Just my opinion. Given the choice .243 for me. 30-30 just has too limited a range for where i hunt. But nice for the woods.

HOOfan_1
March 4, 2011, 12:44 PM
I have a Savage 340 in .30-30. Load it with 150 grain Horandy Interlock bullets. It has taken deer in one shot dead in their tracks at 190 yards. If I am in fairly thick woods, I am using a Winchester 94, Marlin 336 or some .44Mag, .45 Colt gun with open sights.

.30-30 has probably killed several million more deer than the .243. That isn't to say that the .243 is no good for deer, that is to say that anyone who says the .243 is utterly superior for deer hunting is full of bunk.

KodiakBeer
March 4, 2011, 01:18 PM
.30-30 has probably killed several million more deer than the .243. That isn't to say that the .243 is no good for deer, that is to say that anyone who says the .243 is utterly superior for deer hunting is full of bunk.

And there is the oft-quoted refrain about the .22 killing more people than the .357 (or whatever), but that doesn't make the .22 the better defensive round, just the more commonly used.

The .243 is a LOT more versatile than the .30-30, just because it's effective at longer ranges. If you live in some densely forested area and never plan to hunt anywhere else, then the .30-30 is fine. However, if you ever anticipate shooting a deer at 250 or 300 yards, then you're far better off with a .243.

HOOfan_1
March 4, 2011, 01:30 PM
Yet the .30-30 is superior for heavily wooded areas. So there you go, each has its niche. I would say if you plan to shoot out to 250-300 yards you are MUCH better off with something bigger than the .243 as well.

suzukisam
March 4, 2011, 01:45 PM
243 is far superior in almost every way assuming a quality bullet is used. for one as a general rule the 243 will out shoot the 30-30 in every instance.

you can move an 85gr tsx at almost 3400 fps. and only drop 21 inches at 400 yrds

a 150 gr 30-30 is moving about 2150 and drops 44 inches at 400

the weight of the 150 gr is an advantage, I guess? but it would only apply under 150 yrds. inside 150 a 243 with a tsx is going to drop about anything you would need to. as far as bears go I'd rather have my 45-70 or 300 wby mag. but I'd rather have my semi auto 243 over a 30-30 any day. and with hand loads you are able to customize the 243 ammo with a more drastic result over the 30-30. every new hunter I have every advised, I have recommended a 243. it's excellent to learn marksmanship with and a 6mm bullet lends itself to inherent accuracy.

also I would never shoot with a gun counting on hitting brush and having accuracy. a 30-30 is very much less susceptible to this, but you should have a clean shot either way.

Having said all this... a 30-30 is all kinds of fun to shoot. and if you are shooting/ hunting 100 yrds give or take. than I would pick the one you "like" the best. I love lever guns, but I would say the 243 is a far superior cartridge

GuysModel94
March 4, 2011, 09:28 PM
Sam: I would agree with everything you stated except the statement that the .243 is "far" superior. If that were so the 30-30 would have faded away. The .243 is a great first rifle for new hunters, but does have one fault. In the hands of someone who misplaces a shot it has left a lot of wounded animals afield, something the .30 cal. does a lot less of.

gatorjames85
March 4, 2011, 09:32 PM
Quote:
The high velocity of the 243 will drop a deer faster that a 30-30 with a 150 or 170

Oh, really!!!

If you were in the woods and looked up to see an angry bear quickly closing ground on you, which would you rather have? Granted, something even bigger would be better. But between the .243 and .30-30, no brainer

Just because a round is better in a defensive situation against bears at close range doesn't mean it is a better all-around deer round. FWIW, no tracking has been necessary for any deer I have shot with my .243 (or for that matter .22-250). The same can't be said for me and family members in .270 and even .300 wsm. Light, fast, quickly expanding bullets are best for deer IMHO.

suzukisam
March 4, 2011, 10:52 PM
guysmodel94-

I won't say your wrong on that point, because I'm not sure it can be quantified either way. At say 10 yrds either one with a well placed shot is going to be drt and neither will be hard to do. but zero @ 100 your talking about only a 3" drop to 200. so basically anywhere inside 200 you just hold right on and your in the kill zone with a 243. a 30-30 is dropping almost out of the kill zone. so at one range it may put a heavier bullet on target but at another range your making the shot more difficult, resulting in a higher probability of a missed shot. now this is all theoretical, because anyone well trained with either rifle would only take a shot they could make, and probably could make a 200+ shot with a 30-30. what I don't understand is if the buck I shot this year was drt at a little under 200, would it not be just as drt at 10? so other than deflection I feel it is a far superior cartridge. and again if your counting on deflection based on a heavier bullet, I would say that is the biggest gamble in a possible wounded deer. this is all my opinion and many will disagree, some because they are more educated than myself and some because their grandad had one and thats all they see.. like I said before I like 30-30 but with my current caliber selection I just have no use for one. I do load for it though with a buddy. I let him work up loads on my equiment. and supervise him

Eb1
March 4, 2011, 11:03 PM
I would like to through another caliber in the mix, and that is a .25-06. :neener:

Abel
March 5, 2011, 12:28 AM
The 30-30 is way better...than just about everything. Its a rifle round for a real deer hunter. Anything else is just a crutch. People will employ all sorts of gimmicks and foolery to compensate for their lack of skills. Pathetic really. Whenever I see people at deer camp with those rifles that chamber cartridges invented after 1900, I think to myself, "What a joke". Who are they trying to fool? Themselves, is the answer to that question. Themselves.

Eb1
March 5, 2011, 12:45 AM
In response to that comment I can only say, "sale your car, and buy a horse and buggy to commute."
Its a rifle round for a real deer hunter.
That is funny to me because it has been quite a few years since I have not had deer in my freezer, and all were killed with different weapons. Be it shotgun, 30-30, .223, or .25-06.

I honestly do not see how a question like this has any conclusive answer.

Within practical hunting distances. Either one will kill, and do their job well. You have to put the bullet where the bullet should go. Miss. And you loose a deer with either. Hit. And you have venison in the freezer.
The .243 only benefit, if it is a benefit, is the flatter trajectory when shooting longer distances, but people shoot .45-70s to 500 yards. So you can't really use that as a benefit. The 30-30 has a cost for OTC ammo advantage.

I use 125 grain bullets in the 30-30, and it really changes the gun, and also changes the reaction of deer hit with the 30-30 IMO. I have also started using the .25-06 as my primary deer rifle. I can honestly say that the .25-06 seems to put the deer down better with an equally placed shot. The 115 grain Combined Technologies bullet @ 3000 fps muzzle velocity is just impressive.
Also in my experience a 30-30 with 150s or 170s move between 2000-2300 fps is a good deer round, but has a lower percentage of putting the deer down if the deer is on high alert (lung shot not nervous system).vs the .25-06. The damage just isn't as impressive compared to a lighter, faster bullet. I know this is about .243 and 30-30, but the .25-06 is similar to the .243. Similar not same.
Take this into consideration. Load a 125 grain HP to 2500+ fps, and mediocre 30-30 really starts to shine.

Until you can define what application and terrain you will be using the rifle , you will not know which one will benefit you.

lizziedog1
March 5, 2011, 01:23 AM
Since the introduction of the 30-30, the definition of "dead" has changed. It does not mean the same thing as it used to mean.

Eb1
March 5, 2011, 01:39 AM
DRT is what I meant by down, and dead is still dead. I think dead is still dead.

Leaky Waders
March 5, 2011, 04:24 AM
The 30-30 is a very old cartridge designed for smokeless powder. The case has a rim on it...a lip at the bottom. The 30-30 is almost always associated with a lever action and is known for mild recoil. Since nearly everyone has at least shot one and/or hunted with one it is often compared to other rounds as a standard.

The 243 is a necked down 308. It doesn't have any rim and is usually thought of more a bolt action or auto rifle (like a BAR). The 243 is often thought to be a 'beginner' round because of lack of recoil.

As others have pointed out, both rounds can be used to hunt everything within reason. Bullet construction and placement...as it comes down to in any round...would be the key.

Personally, I'd just get a 7mm08 and call it a day.

McCall911
March 5, 2011, 04:40 AM
I have nothing against the .243 at all, but for my purposes a 30-30 would be the better choice. Not only does it have a larger bullet for better surface area, it's not as much a high pressure round as the .243. To my understanding, with higher pressure rounds like the .243 you have to worry more about barrel wear. It's wise to take precautions while shooting/sighting-in to let the barrel cool before each shot. Though it wouldn't hurt to do so with a 30-30, it's not a must.

336A
March 5, 2011, 09:43 AM
The .243 Win is at it's best when used for varmint sized game up to deer. It has minimal recoil which is why it is often the first choice when introducing young hunters to big game hunting. It's drawbacks however are it's light bullets which have low sectional densities namely those below 100gr (80gr - 95gr). On big bodied deer it is often best to wait for perfect shot presentation, that being a broad side shot. This becomes more important at longer distances were the little bullet begins to run out of steam. Of course as has been mentioned another great virtue of this cartridge is it's flat trajectory.

The .30-30 is at it's best when used on deer sized game out to 200 yards, which is fine since the majority of big game taken are well within this distance every year. Unlike what some others have alluded to, the .30-30 is a very lethal and quick killer of game as can be witnessed here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1g4xILwfY60

Having said that however no two animals are going to react the same after recieving identicle shot placement. If a animals is lost after having been hit with any hunting cartridge it can be traced back to operator error. I've never lost a single animal that I hit solidly with the .30-30. Then again I don't shoot until I'm solidly set up for the shot either. If I can't get set up for a good shot regardless of the cartridge that I'm using then I don't shoot period.

I like to view the .30-30 as a true hunters cartridge. By that I mean you may have to rely on your stalking skills or other field craft if you find your quarry is outside the effective range of you or the cartridge. The .30-30 is a much more suitable cartridge for use on larger animals such as elk or moose as well, since you have the use of 170gr bullets and the newer Buffalo Bore 190gr ammo. However again you will have to rely on your skills to get close especially with elk. Another virtue of the .30-30 is cheap and widely available ammunition. It is probably the cheapest centerfire big game cartridge that can be bought today.

The above is just my opinion of course and certainly others will disagree. However I haven't witnessed anything that would change my opinion on the subject yet.

lizziedog1
March 5, 2011, 10:23 PM
The above is just my opinion of course and certainly others will disagree. However I haven't witnessed anything that would change my opinion on the subject yet.


Wait until you witness 30-30 bullets bouncing off a deer. Then you will change your mind.;)

suzukisam
March 5, 2011, 10:48 PM
The high velocity of the 243 will drop a deer faster that a 30-30 with a 150 or 170 gr bullet at any range

yes sir I do believe you are correct! shock is a major factor! with bullet that will disperse the energy into the deer, your good to go. if you've every shot a deer with a belted magnum, they just fold up! assuming good shot placement I think the shock just scares 'em to death!:neener:

336A
March 5, 2011, 11:12 PM
yes sir I do believe you are correct! shock is a major factor! with bullet that will disperse the energy into the deer, your good to go. if you've every shot a deer with a belted magnum, they just fold up! assuming good shot placement I think the shock just scares 'em to death!

Well that statement stinks as much as horse apples. I've taken two deer with my 7mm Rem mag and they did no such thing as just fold up upon being shot, instead they ran for about 30 yards before falling over. What did happen though was me throwing away bloodshot meat. All of the deer that I've taken with my .30-30 have ran about 30 yards as well the big difference however was I could eat up to the bullet hole.

336A
March 5, 2011, 11:15 PM
Wait until you witness 30-30 bullets bouncing off a deer. Then you will change your mind.

I know I wish the dang deer would stop reading these posts on the internet:D

suzukisam
March 5, 2011, 11:20 PM
Well that statement stinks as much as horse apples.

Well I don't know what horse apples smell like, but if you sniff stinky stuff I'll just take your word that your the expert in such things. well every deer doesn't do the same thing, but the two I shot with 243 this year all folded up where they were. and all of them my old man shot w a 7mm mag did also.. now that I think of it the one my uncle shot with a 300wsm did also. guess they're just more cooperative where we hunt

HOOfan_1
March 5, 2011, 11:23 PM
All the deer I've seen shot with a .30-30 just folded up too.

788Ham
March 5, 2011, 11:29 PM
"The 30-30 is a much more suitable for use on larger animals, such as elk or moose as well since you have the use of 170 grain bullets" Well, sounds like there another load of horse apples to haul. "The 30-30 much more suitable for elk or moose?" You'd best be able to jack that Win. quick when you smack a bull moose and not kill him with the first one, same goes with the elk! Not saying it hasn't been done, but you're braver than I am to hunt either one with a small rifle like that. You'd have way more luck with a single shot from the .243 on either of them, the shocking power is more apt to break the neck, if thats where your shooting to hit. I've seen my Pop and brother kill a lot of elk with a .243, most of them single shots too!

wrs840
March 5, 2011, 11:49 PM
So if the .243's best attribute is being "the" lower-recoil compromise for a modern flatter-trajectory/longer range cartridge, why would an adult male want one (unless they're especially recoil-sensitive)?

A 30-30 lever is a cost-effective brush-rifle solution. A .35 Rem lever is a better brush-rifle solution.

A .223 is a cost-effective varmint solution. A 22-250 is a better varmint solution.

.270 or .308 or 30-06 are "common" deer calibers. A .243 does what "better" besides "lower recoil" for "youngsters". It's not cheaper to shoot, so what's the attraction? School me please. What am I missing here?

suzukisam
March 6, 2011, 12:09 AM
o if the .243's best attribute is being "the" lower-recoil compromise for a modern flatter-trajectory/longer range cartridge, why would adult male want one if they're not especially recoil-sensitive?

A 30-30 lever is a cost-effective brush-rifle solution. A .35 Rem lever is a better brush-rifle solution.

A .223 is a cost-effective varmint solution. A 22-250 is a better varmint solution.

.270 or .308 or 30-06 are "common" deer calibers. A .243 does what "better" besides "lower recoil" for "youngsters". It's not cheaper to shoot, so what's the attraction? School me please. What am I missing here?
__________________

well I think this is an over simplification. "better" is a relative term. there are many attributes to the 243 that are great. whether they are better for you or another guy is for you to decide. 6mm is an inherently accurate caliber. Also you do have a light recoil. I'm not recoil sensitive I shoot a 300wby magnum, however that doesn't mean it isn't nice to shoot the 243. also it is economical to shoot. with a fast twist and a heavy bullet you can effectively shoot 1000yrds. I have a video on how to bed and float a factory rifle and a 14 year old kid shoots a little over moa at 1000 yrds with heavy bergers and a factory rem 700 that has been bedded and floated.. with the new bullet designs such as the tsx's(my favorite) you can take large game with low recoil and a very flat accurate bullet. I mean a 6mm leaving at 3400 fps is a very effective tool. I love 7mm mag, 270, 300 wby mag, all cartridges I've used, but I just don't find many things my 243 can't do. so why tear up the meat more and have the heavy recoil, and cost of practice. Again I wanna stress I have no issues with any of these other calibers, actually I love them and use them and own them. 243 is one of my all time favorites. and when I get a chance to talk about all the reasons I like it... it's cool.

wrs840
March 6, 2011, 12:35 AM
^^^^
Your explanation makes sense. I'm still a noob at game hunting. I "get it" about not tearing up meat you'd rather put in the freezer though.

Thanks.

Abel
March 6, 2011, 08:31 AM
The 30-30 has been used to kill moose for as long as its been a cartridge available to the people living in moose country. As per always, shot placement is key. Here are some real world accounts, from the BC hunting forum, from British Columbia hunters on the viability of the 30-30 on our largest deer species, the moose:

http://www.huntingbc.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=31758

gkdir
March 6, 2011, 08:54 AM
For me the biggest difference is about 400 yds.

lizziedog1
March 6, 2011, 09:43 AM
Here is the perfect 30-30 solution. Etch* the word "magnum" next to 30-30 Win on the rim. Then write the word magnum with a Sharpie on the cartridge box. Now you have extended the versatility of the round. Also make sure to say the word magnum often and loudly when deer hunting. Make sure the deer can here it. Now be careful. All this magnum talk will increase recoil, so make sure you have a firm grip on your rifle when you squeeze the trigger.

*Be careful with the etching. If you use an electric tool, avoid contact with the primer.:what:

suzukisam
March 6, 2011, 10:02 AM
Here is the perfect 30-30 solution. Etch* the word "magnum" next to 30-30 Win on the rim. Then write the word magnum with a Sharpie on the cartridge box

Not sure it would be a good idea.. you might give your 30-30 an inferiority complex. I couldn't hunt with a gun that had low self esteem:neener:

Pistol Ranch
March 6, 2011, 11:49 AM
The 30-30 has probably been used to kill more deer than the .243, .270 and 30-06 combined. That said, it is, at best, a 150 yard cartridge.
The .243 can be effective on deer out to 300 yards in the hands of a good rifleman.
The 30-30 is a handy rifle to keep in a truck/tractor on a ranch for quick shots at varmints.
A scoped .243 makes an excellent varmint rifle for long range shots.
It is my belief that the 30-30 produces more "felt recoil" than an average
(7 lb.) scoped .243 rifle.
The .243 is inherently more accurate than a 30-30.

Opposing views are expected.:rolleyes:

P.R.

Abel
March 6, 2011, 12:51 PM
That said, it is, at best, a 150 yard cartridge.

I can live with that. The 30-30 is at its best within 150 yards for sure. The farthest that I've killed a deer is less than that. If you are in a setting with wide open spaces, its not the best choice. I have managed to take nearly 70 whitetails within the confines of this 150 yard parameter, some with a 30-30.

The .243 is inherently more accurate than a 30-30.


No, its not.

suzukisam
March 6, 2011, 01:23 PM
Abel- yes it is... do a little research, according to several industry leaders like Nosler and hornady(the men not the company) 6mm is the most inherently accurate caliber. No one is saying your 30-30 isn't accurate. There is a difference in an accurate gun and an accurate caliber. And as a genereal rule anything in a 6mm,or 6.5 is going to be more forgiving of a poor quality firearms than any others. Not to mention a 30-30 uses a balistically un-efficient. Bullet construction.... it is a more inherently accurate caliber. This is why I like the 6.5 swede so well, again these same guys have praised its inherent accuracy

Abel
March 6, 2011, 01:28 PM
Inherent accuracy is hogwash for people who like to punch little holes in paper out at 300 yards. The Marlin 336 doesn't even come in 243....

*Please don't try to tell me what the word inherently means. It will not have any bearing on the deer rifle that I carry with me this fall. Thanks.

suzukisam
March 6, 2011, 01:55 PM
"The topic is what is the difference between 243 and 30-30"

Not

"What calibers does a 336 marlin come in"

And I agree you should take whatever gun you like into the field.

And I like to punch holes in animals at 300 not paper... but to each his own!

Abel
March 6, 2011, 02:00 PM
"The topic is what is the difference between wre and 30-30"


Sure it was. That was covered ad nauseum in the first two pages of posts. We're just havin' fun with it at this point. Carry on. :)

Still Shooting
March 6, 2011, 02:20 PM
If I were to start over as a hunter, and I only had a choice between a .243 and a 30-30, I'd be inclined to go with the .243 as a "first" gun. -But I'm not a beginner, and I started out hunting 'chucks with a Savage 340 in .22 Hornet. I got a Remington 760 in .270 as a high school graduation gift, and as soon as it was acceptable I got rid of it. The gun couldn't group tighter than 4-5" at 50 yards. Overpowered and underaccurate.

I have my Dad's remington Model 14 (.30 Remington) today; he's where he no longer needs it. The gun was bought in 1920 for $12 by my grandfather, who raised and fed 5 kids through the depression. For 2 generations, it was never fired without bringing home venison. Most of my Dad's hunting buddies, the men with whom I learned to hunt, carried 30-30's. They were all good hunters, and all had venison most years. So I will not disparage the 30-30 (or the .30 Rem - same ballistics).

My own 2 go-to guns are my .257 Roberts (Ruger 77) and my maternal granddad's 6.5x55 Swede sporter, now mine. My Roberts has done several whitetails, a muley, and an antelope. One bullet per animal, all DRT.

My young wife had never handled or fired a gun until a year ago. I gave her a Ruger M77 lightweight .243 as a first gun, and she carried it this past fall. She has "eyes" for my Ruger .270 Win. already, and who knows where she'll end up. But she started with the .243, and became very, very accurate with it. She can carry it all day, and she has confidence that she can put the bullet exactly where it has to be to do the job. That counts for a lot. Thus, my opening statement.:)

lizziedog1
March 6, 2011, 08:23 PM
6mm is the most inherently accurate caliber.

Was this bestowed on the 6mm by the gun gods?

Before I keep reading this thread I better go look for my hip boots and crack a window open.:confused:

Pistol Ranch
March 6, 2011, 08:46 PM
Quote:

Was this bestowed on the 6mm by the gun gods?

Before I keep reading this thread I better go look for my hip boots and crack a window open.

"It is better to keep your mouth closed and appear a fool than to open it and remove all doubt"...Mark Twain

P.R.;)

suzukisam
March 6, 2011, 09:36 PM
Was this bestowed on the 6mm by the gun gods?

Before I keep reading this thread I better go look for my hip boots and crack a window open.

ignorance is no excuse to be rude!

rc109a
March 6, 2011, 09:54 PM
All the deer I've seen shot with a .30-30 just folded up too.

I am still trying to figure out how to fold up these deer. Does it make them easier to pack out of the woods? Do you have to shoot them several times to get them backpack size? I am just messing...

gatorjames85
March 7, 2011, 10:27 AM
.270 or .308 or 30-06 are "common" deer calibers. A .243 does what "better" besides "lower recoil" for "youngsters". It's not cheaper to shoot, so what's the attraction? School me please. What am I missing here?

It has been my experience that the .243 causes more explosive wound channels on impact than larger, slower rounds like .308 or 30-06. This makes it a great round for thin-skinned animals like deer. It is also flatter shooting than the non-magnum .30 rounds. FWIW, when I went hunting out in west Texas , all the guides said that they used .243's for deer.

D*N*R*
March 7, 2011, 01:13 PM
Entertaining thread. I cant think of two more different rounds to compair(besides low recoil)I hunt -some times- with a 30 30 because its there. Witch is the only reason there are 30 30s.((If 30 30s never existed before and were introduced today people would ask ??Is this some kind of ar round?? because its ballistics arent ideal for hunting. Sorry 30 30 diehards -- nothing wrong with it inside 100yrds. My opinion is if your a 150yrd hunter why not have a 300yrd gun - 150 is covered and then some.

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