Nightstand gun with children in the house?


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ratt_finkel
March 5, 2011, 04:41 PM
I'm curious. For those of you that have young children in the house. Where do you keep your bed side gun so it's both readily accessible and safe from the kiddos?

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browneu
March 5, 2011, 04:43 PM
On the nightstand in a biometrich safe.

Shadow 7D
March 5, 2011, 04:55 PM
a lock box (and no, they are not a 'safe' hell then can't even resist a screwdriver....)
like a gunvault or similar would work fine, keeping little hands off what they shouldn't be on.

Check out Corneredcat.com, she has an excellent article on Gun-proofing your child, since, by now you realize that you can't child proof anything.

If you are concerned, two espoused practices are, it's on you belt, until you go to bed, then it's on the nightstand,
a version of this is to leave the lock box open at night, and either put you gun on, or lock it up when you get up in the morning.

Gouranga
March 5, 2011, 05:03 PM
During the night in a corner shelf 6 ft off the floor. During the day IWB on my person. If I am not taking it IWB then it is in a biometric safe.

DWC
March 5, 2011, 05:33 PM
In my night stand top drawer on The Pistol Pad which interfaces the gun to my alarm system.

Seen at:

http://www.thepistolpad.com

DWC

baronello
March 5, 2011, 06:00 PM
We don't have kids in the house, but when guests visit, I always hide my revolver somewhere else besides the bedside drawer. My shotgun remains under the bed, as I figure if they were fooling around in the bedroom I would just shoo them out and close the door. This is a serious issue and one that everyone needs to remain vigilant about.

Sam1911
March 5, 2011, 06:03 PM
Shotgun under the bed, empty chamber, cable lock.

kimbernut
March 5, 2011, 06:08 PM
Wife's resides full time in a gunvault. Mine normally resides in the night stand drawer but if the grandkids are around it goes either in the gunvault or top shelf (7.5 feet) of the closet. Backup J-frame stashed plenty high but readily available.

geekWithA.45
March 5, 2011, 06:13 PM
Homak gun safe.

I think you'll find that the general consensus is that some sort of lockbox is needed with kids.

Owen Sparks
March 5, 2011, 06:27 PM
I don't have any children but I helped a buddy child proof his bedroom. We figured out how to put his guns where the kids can't get to them but he can.
His wife bought an antique wardrobe that stands over 7' tall. He keeps a loaded shotgun and a 1911 on top of it. His two small children could not reach them if they even if they stand on the tallest chair in the room, plus they do not know about the guns anyway. This is one good option for parents of small children. Simply put your guns "up" on something high, remove anything that could be used as a ladder by a curious climber and don't tell the kids about it.

Shadow 7D
March 5, 2011, 06:31 PM
Um, no, that works, for a little while
by the time a kid is 4 or 5, the can scale, or, MOVE stuff and get up there, like an end table or dresser.

two parts, keep the gun secure,
and train your kids

friscolatchi
March 5, 2011, 06:33 PM
Everything is locked in a safe with ammo locked separately in another part of the house.

I have locked steel boxes and lockers scattered throughout the place. My EDC du jour is concealed on my person at all times until bedtime when it's in my briefcase or nightstand next to the bed. There is not ever more than 1 loaded weapon around and it is always an arms length away.

I spend a lot if time fussing about and organizing my collection. For example, I stage my current season's hunting guns in a locked cabinet in the garage, for example the 12 gauge for turkey and 1 22 pistol is available without going into the house. Ammo is always locked separately in my "secret" location. What I would not want to happen is a BG getting to my stuff before I do. The only problem that I have is remembering where I put things! Getting old maybe. Maybe more ginko?

donny640
March 5, 2011, 07:21 PM
Please keep your guns locked up if not on your person. The little ones will find them. My three year old niece went to climb a 6ft closet, we grabbed her before she got hurt. That is the closet my sister would store all the medications and mr. yuk stuff in.

WardenWolf
March 5, 2011, 07:34 PM
Depends on the kid. Some kids listen and don't get into your stuff, others are little plunderers. I'd recommend a biometric safe. They're much safer and faster to access than a cable lock or a trigger lock. Just jam your thumb into it and go. These are absolutely the simplest and safest solution because you can always open them quickly. It just requires gross muscle action. I would never trust one of those 5-finger safe things because I don't think you can reliably open it under pressure. Could you type perfectly at high-speed in a high-adrenaline emergency? No? Then you probably can't open one of these during a robbery.

DammitBoy
March 5, 2011, 07:49 PM
I always kept my 1911 without a round in the chamber, it was too much for little hands to draw back the slide and chamber a round. As soon as they were old enough to understand, they were educated in firearm safety and the rules of the house.

The main rule was they could look at and hold any gun in the house they wanted to as long as I was there and they had my permission. I would tell them all about the gun they were interested in until they were bored silly.

Never had any issue with fiream safety in our household and my daughter is an avid shooter. My son chooses to not be interested at all.

Jesse Heywood
March 5, 2011, 07:50 PM
When my kids were young I had a security file cabinet by the bed, used as a nightstand. They were two keys, one on the key chain of the wife and I. The file was unlocked at night, locked when I got up in the morning. The kids were taught how to shoot about age 7, knew what the guns could do, and were told that any time they wanted to handle the guns they could. Even with all the training, I was not willing to take the chance of them having access to loaded firearms.

donny640
March 5, 2011, 08:03 PM
All depends if you have older kids that have been taught about guns or a three year old that is going to get in and find everything. Always watched the toddlers but always made sure they had no way to access the guns.

Shadow 7D
March 5, 2011, 08:08 PM
Um, I will point out something that some of the mods pointed out before

Kids are cleaver, if it can be done, and they know it can, they will find a way to do it
(so, don't count on them not racking the slide)

the strongest grip is both hand manipulating a lever with the thumbs
So 2 things
don't count of a heavy DA from stopping a kid from pulling a trigger
If the have to muscle it, the above grip, puts the barrel, where the pointy stuff comes out, right in their face...

Better in a safe, than a child in the ground.

Now that said, I'm not telling you to lock up your guns in a gun safe, rather, please keep them out of reach of children when they aren't on you. Also, most not home invasion burglars pick up their weapons in the house, so...
if you can get it, so can they, just they are awake, and you aren't.

ratt_finkel
March 5, 2011, 08:31 PM
Thanks for the great ideas. The kids don't live with us permanently yet. 4 year old boy and 6 yo girl. Working on custody.

At some point, I would like to educate them rather than shelter them. In the mean time, the biometric safe sounds like a great idea.

USAF_Vet
March 5, 2011, 09:11 PM
Two kids, both educated about the guns. 12 ga under the bed, empty chamber, action locked, safety on. Carbine on the top shelf of the closet. Educate them and satisfy their curiosity with a family range day.

sweater914
March 5, 2011, 09:11 PM
Dad always had his gun room, and all three of use were told to stay out of the room unless he was around. Not all the guns were locked. I was one of those kids who would plunder, but the guns were much more than the candy and cookies I was sneaking away from the kitchen. My Dad also had a pretty good temper which my brother and sister did not want to test, when we did it was usually pulled hair or semi-permanent hand prints on our collective bottoms. The bedroom was also more or less off limits.

While in Europe I knew things weren't going well in my Dad's Air Force job when the M1A NM was loaded with a 20rd mag up against his nightstand, usually meant a terrorist threat to the base or individual officers like my dad, I had no itch to even enter the doorway to the room. After another move a Remington 870 sat quietly in the closet, loaded. By high school I had a rack of FR8 Mausers, and a bunch of ammo in my bedroom. My dad even let me keep a 1911 in my desk drawer unloaded with no mag, so I could tinker with it, taking it apart and putting it back together.

All three of us were bought up with firearms, my dad never had any issues with any of us. What few friends I had growing up in multiple locations rarely entered the house, kind of our way of minimizing curious hands and eyes, whether on purpose or subconsciously.

I have a Model 63 covered in a drawer next to my wife's nightstand. I've let my 6 year old handle some of my handguns under supervision and he knows to get mommy if he sees one out of place and not to touch it. My older stepson knows were the firearms are located and he keeps his buddies out of my gun room. The safety between the ears is much more important than the one on the gun.

Every situation is different, the arguement can go either way depending on circumstance. If you're uncomfortable lock'em up.

Wes B
March 5, 2011, 09:15 PM
In a lockbox on the nightstand next to the bed under The ABC's of Reloading.

Oldfalguy
March 5, 2011, 09:31 PM
I had 3 young children once upon a time (now they are adults) kids who I taught to shoot at a very young age and would not play with Daddy's gun but its the other kids they bring home that will mess with one and sure as hell its YOUR kids that gets shot.
I locked all guns up in the vault-
Kept a Kabar by the bed and 2 large German shepherds-
one inside and one outside.
Kids grew up, dogs passed away so I am back to one in the nightstand.
If I ever have grandkids around, while crawling and little at most I will put the Glock up and use the P7M8 till they get older then when they are here the guns go back in the vault again-

One-Time
March 5, 2011, 10:04 PM
I gun proof my kids, same as my father except my other guns are in a safe not stacked in a corner

pabner
March 5, 2011, 10:42 PM
My wife and I have two gun safes. One with a double pistol box mounted on top for quick access. None of which are biometric.

We have no children in the house but my 19 month old granddaughter is making me think we should go biometric.

She calls my wife and I without any assistance dialing. O.K. It is speed dial but she learned the numbers by watching. She was not taught. Same way with the TV. She can turn it on and channel it to Disney. The other day she picked up my cell phone and accessed my email. She proudly told Popi you have mail. Again without being taught.

I have no doubt, as she gets older and taller, she will be able to open a safe.

I know every parent thinks their child is the smartest and cutest. But children are more observant and more able to figure out things than grownups give them credit.

prefetch
March 6, 2011, 12:21 AM
do you guys trust biometric safes? anything electronic i think is prone to failure and i'm not excited about relying on. i've heard stories about them being flakey.

Manco
March 6, 2011, 08:00 AM
I use the following pistol box from Fort Knox:

http://www.ftknox.com/redesign/pistolboxes/

The lock is an all-mechanical Simplex push-button unit with no batteries or key backup required (doesn't have one anyway ;)). It's robust, reliable, and quick and easy to use.

do you guys trust biometric safes? anything electronic i think is prone to failure and i'm not excited about relying on. i've heard stories about them being flakey.

Personally, I don't trust electronic locks because they rely on batteries, and I'd have to keep a backup mechanical key handy all the time--a key that could potentially be found by those I'm trying to keep out. :uhoh:

jbr
March 6, 2011, 08:15 AM
When old enough i agree with training, exposure etc... I will say this, kids to not have impulse control. you can not trust them to keep their hands off. I came home from hunting one day and left my rifle in a hard plastic case in my bedroom - unloaded of course. Told the kids i need to clean it - not to get near it. Came home found out from the baby sitter that my son had opened the case to show a friend the rifle. I asked her why she didn't stop him - but she is only 17 and doesn't know anything about guns. That was less than 1 hour after i told him not to touch it! You have to lock them up - it's not hard to keep them handy but safe. And he's my kid that usually does exactly as he is told and is more cautious of guns than my daughter. Sometimes "kool" over rides fear and discipline! You can get a decent handgun safe for $100 or so.

jonmerritt
March 6, 2011, 09:48 AM
we were tought at a young age, guns are not toys, and what they are used for. You could leave a gun laying out in the open, we wouldn't touch it. It was loaded (as far as we knew) get mom or dad. I was when we were older we were allowed to handle a gun by ourselves (teens).

WardenWolf
March 6, 2011, 01:09 PM
do you guys trust biometric safes? anything electronic i think is prone to failure and i'm not excited about relying on. i've heard stories about them being flakey.
Depends on the individual safe, but biometric technology has improved a LOT in the last few years. I'm in the computer field. Nowadays, lots of laptops come with fingerprint scanners and they work, unlike the previous generations that were flaky at best. With the good safes, you can enter multiple fingers to allow more than one person to access it and to ensure you can access it if your preferred finger is injured and unreadable. Fact is, if you do your research and get a good one, biometric is, by far, the fastest, easiest, and most reliable method of getting into your safe. They all come with a key, too, in case something happens and you need to get into it manually.

swinokur
March 6, 2011, 02:27 PM
I use a Gunvault deluxe on the bottom shelf of my nightstand. I open it at bedtime and close it in the morning.It use an electronic keypad which is very fast to open. I keep a full size 1911 and 2 Glocks with spare mags in it. (G29 and G30)

I have a locking Stack On wall cabinet with my spare ammo and 870 in it. Same drill, open at night close and lock in the morning.

My other precaution is to have no round in the chamber. I am hopeful I will have time to rack the slide. Rather safe than sorry. IMO

www.gunvault.com (http://www.gunvault.com)
www.center-of-mass.com (http://www.center-of-mass.com)

xfyrfiter
March 6, 2011, 05:32 PM
I have to agree with the theory that you can't childproof anything, so you have to gunproof the child. BTW teens are worse than preschoolers.

DammitBoy
March 6, 2011, 07:04 PM
Seriously, if you know a preschooler who can rack the slide on a full sized 1911 - get them off the steroids...

tazbigdog
March 6, 2011, 09:16 PM
Trigger lock in a pelican case in the closet. Also have a Surefire 6p light for at night scenarios.

Jesse Heywood
March 6, 2011, 10:37 PM
Thanks for the great ideas. The kids don't live with us permanently yet. 4 year old boy and 6 yo girl. Working on custody.

You might want to wait until you have the custody issue settled. If the ex's attorney gets wind of having loaded guns in the house it could be used against you. Not all judges are sympathetic with gun owners. I would at least run it by my attorney and get his opinion. It might not be a problem, but you need to know if it is.

25cschaefer
March 6, 2011, 10:45 PM
I hide mine in the bottom of the toy chest, they will never look there. Just kidding, I have a baby, and a gunvault, coming in may.

Mikesull415
March 6, 2011, 10:46 PM
I agree with others on here about kids being smarter than most give them credit for. I dont have any of my own, but between 2 older sisters have 7 nieces and nephews, and they're scary smart as far as paying attention when you think they aren't. If your gun isn't on you then It really needs to be locked up

sailorken
March 6, 2011, 11:25 PM
My 1911 with laser sight is loaded, cocked and locked - kept in a handgun safe on my bedside table. Access is by a 4 push button combination accessable in the dark. All the rest of my guns are in a locked gun cabinet.

A good way to get killed is using a gun lock on your "ready gun".

The only child frequenting my house is now a teen and trained in firearm safety (and a good marksman too.) She knows where the guns are and all the rules.

Dulvarian
March 6, 2011, 11:34 PM
YMMV.

I've trained my kids over and over and over on safety. Basically the Eddie Eagle course with no eagle.

During the last monthly 'Daddy takes out the guns and you get to look at them' we found that my oldest was able to rack the slide on not one, but two of the handguns that I keep loaded (but not chambered).

I have no concerns that my daughter will be playing with my guns. There is no mystery, nothing other than a constant drilling in about safety.

My Glock sits on the top of my nightstand. None of the children have ever touched it. It sits in the same spot, and has for so long that there is a dust free spot where the gun sits.

I learned how to pick locks breaking into my dad's gun cabinet. There isn't a lock that can't be defeated if your kids really want to. Same thing with a criminal. My kids worst punishment for mishandling, or handling without permission would be a swift corporal punishment followed by an uninvite to the next time out to the range.

They know they can't handle the guns without my permission just like they aren't allowed to use my tools without supervision. Same exact concept. I'm actually much more scared of injuries if the garage with power tools than I am in the rest of the house with firearms.

When my oldest locked the slide back on two handguns, my wife and I had a little discussion that night about whether we wanted to move to putting them in the safes. We jointly decided that our eldest has the discretion and sense not to handle them without permission and that we didn't need it.

My kids get the same rules of safety with using 'tools' as they do firearms, because to me, they are just tools.

However, if I had revolvers in the house, I would take additional steps to secure them. I'll also add that my kids are never unattended at home, and they have strict instruction and repeated lessons on what to do if they are somewhere else and become unattended around firearms.

I trust my kids. They have earned it.

While on the note of securing handguns, are all of your knives secure? I have dozens of knives all over, and most of them are sharp enough to shave with. Those are left where they are for the same reason that the guns are. They are where I want them in case I need them. What about kitchen knives? And they get the same kinds of lessons with knives as they do with other 'tools', to include firearms and power tools, etc. I've been giving them these types of lessons since they were old enough to talk.

Like I said, YMMV. Talk to your wife, figure out what works for you. My children are also well behaved, and emotionally balanced. If you had some concerns with your child's behavior and ability or desire to follow instruction, prudence would dictate that you take additional precautions.

cmat
March 6, 2011, 11:37 PM
I keep the loaded ones on the top shelf in the closet, I don't trust it down lower with a curious little 3 year old running around.

DammitBoy
March 6, 2011, 11:39 PM
Dulvarian, how old is your oldest?

Arkansas Paul
March 6, 2011, 11:40 PM
Seriously, if you know a preschooler who can rack the slide on a full sized 1911 - get them off the steroids...


Exactly!
I keep mine beside the bed, magazine in, chamber empty.
I had a GP-100 by the bed before my daughter was born but I got nervous about a double action revolver being loaded and in reach. I was afraid of her maybe handling it and dropping it, causing it to fire. I don't know if that was a rational thought or not, but it bothered me, so it got put away and an autoloader with an empty chamber took it's place. I feel it's safer, and the time needed for me to rack the slide is almost non-exsistent.
She's 7 now by the way, and likes to go out shooting her pink Cricket. She can recite the 4 rules as well as anyone on here and she follows them to the letter. I couldn't be more proud.

sniper5
March 6, 2011, 11:44 PM
No children in the house. When the little ones visit (they live 1800 miles away so they don't "drop in") the shotgun goes in the lockbox rack (Mossberg, like a cop's car mount) in the closet and the wife's revolver goes in the safe. Everything else is locked into the safe.

DammitBoy
March 6, 2011, 11:45 PM
Exactly!
I keep mine beside the bed, magazine in, chamber empty.
I had a GP-100 by the bed before my daughter was born but I got nervous about a double action revolver being loaded and in reach. I was afraid of her maybe handling it and dropping it, causing it to fire. I don't know if that was a rational thought or not, but it bothered me, so it got put away and an autoloader with an empty chamber took it's place. I feel it's safer, and the time needed for me to rack the slide is almost non-exsistent.
She's 7 now by the way, and likes to go out shooting her pink Cricket. She can recite the 4 rules as well as anyone on here and she follows them to the letter. I couldn't be more proud.

Wait til she's a teenager and she outshoots all the men who want to know why there's a girl on the range! Mine makes me grin like a racoon everytime we go. :D

FAS1
March 7, 2011, 09:09 AM
My kids are grown and gone but I still keep my HD handgun secured but accessible at my bedside. That way I don't have a concern no matter who visits. Educate your kids, but don't underestimate their curiosity or abilities.

http://www.fas1safe.com/images/12421583724691669415992.jpeg

rocky branch
March 7, 2011, 04:02 PM
saw an interesting study years ago.

In a clinic they had a group of kids around 5-8 years old, playing in a room with no adults.
Some were from "gun" homes.

Anyways one opened a toybox and it contained several real pistols.

Very quickly they all were in the hands of the kids who were waving them about, pointing at each other and dry firing them.

Parents were in the next room behind a one way mirror-they were aghast.
Most thought their kids "knew better."

Never put anything past a curious kid given the right opportunity.
Also their friends, if in your house.

DammitBoy
March 7, 2011, 04:12 PM
saw an interesting study years ago.

In a clinic they had a group of kids around 5-8 years old, playing in a room with no adults.
Some were from "gun" homes.

Anyways one opened a toybox and it contained several real pistols.

Very quickly they all were in the hands of the kids who were waving them about, pointing at each other and dry firing them.

Parents were in the next room behind a one way mirror-they were aghast.
Most thought their kids "knew better."

Never put anything past a curious kid given the right opportunity.
Also their friends, if in your house.

The moral of the story?

Don't hide your guns in the kids toybox. :rolleyes:

tarosean
March 7, 2011, 04:33 PM
Seriously, if you know a preschooler who can rack the slide on a full sized 1911 - get them off the steroids...

Not sure if he racked it or not as the camera doesnt show it... Heres what a 2-3yr old can do.
Link to vid

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=053_1229002851&c=1

Ohio Gun Guy
March 7, 2011, 04:50 PM
I've got kids and pistol safes are the way to go IMO.

I also teach my kids; Even though they are locked up, I do not leave one in the chamber.

Smoovbiscuit
March 7, 2011, 05:19 PM
Don't underestimate a child's ability to find stuff. putting guns up high is not sufficient unless you have a toddler, or a mature trained teenager. Any age in between you should have a safe. When I was a kid I was always looking around trying to see if my dad had a gun (he always said he didn't but for some reason I didn't believe him, he always seemed like he was hiding something) and when I was in my teens I was snoopin for pills and drugs. My parents never suspected anything, so even if your kids are trained don't trust them too much!

I didn't learn gun safety until I was about 15 and my over protective parents finally let me go shooting with my friends father, who taught me gun safety and how to shoot/handle firearms safely.

I now live near my family members, and my 10 year old cousin comes over to visit sometimes. He is quite immature for his age, and not trained in guns or gun safety at all, and he doesn't have respect for other peoples property.

He once told me how his friends dad had made his friend and him angry (don't remember why) so they went looking for his gun to "bend the barrel" he said. They found the gun but
luckily they could not find the ammo. and obviously they couldn't bend the barrel.. I scolded him for doing that but he did seem to get the message or understand the severity of the situation. To him it was a big joke.

I now have to keep a deadbolt on my bedroom door and my pistols in a lock box. I keep my door locked whenever I am not in it. I open the box at night for quick access to my guns.

I really wish my aunt and uncle would take some time to teach their kid gun safety and respect. They are both in the Army too, I shouldn't have to tell them to teach their kid gun safety and basic respect of others property.

CoRoMo
March 7, 2011, 05:23 PM
The manner in which I mounted this pistol safe (http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&sugexp=ldymls&xhr=t&q=gunvault+microvault&cp=12&bav=on.2,or.&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=1045552763030742922&sa=X&ei=Ylp1TcTpC8L68AaCkdSRAw&sqi=2&ved=0CEMQ8wIwAw#) to the nightstand is something to be admired. Now the wife wants one for hers.

DammitBoy
March 7, 2011, 08:42 PM
Not sure if he racked it or not as the camera doesnt show it... Heres what a 2-3yr old can do.
Link to vid

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=053_1229002851&c=1

Moral of the story, don't hand your infant a loaded gun.

He didn't have to rack the slide, his father had just fired it, thus chambering another round.

Offlow
March 8, 2011, 11:47 AM
Glock 20 OWB when I'm awake, otherwise it's on the dresser while we sleep.

I have a 4 year old son and he learned THREE years ago to not touch guns without daddy present. But he is an exceptionally good and smart child.

I do think a handgun safe might be in order in the coming years though.

jim goose
March 9, 2011, 12:48 AM
Semi auto only, no revolver. Gun at top of closet under sweater stack and mag in top drawer of dresser.

ReadyontheRight
March 9, 2011, 01:08 AM
It's sad how easy it is to open up a Gunvault. It's not really a "safe", just something to keep the kids out.

I agree with gun-proofing your kids, but gun-proofing their friends is much more difficult. This is where something like a Gun Vault is valuable.

TheProf
March 9, 2011, 05:07 PM
Gun proofing for kids...

1. Keep all other guns in the safe.
2. Keep SD gun on your person.
3. Or...on those rare occasions...use the +1 system.

For instance, you if believe that keeping your handgun on the top shelf is enough to keep it away from your 8 month old child, add ONE MORE layer of protection: perhaps use a special retention holster or keep the chamber empty.

What ever your system for keeping your SD arms from kids...add ONE MORE layer of protection than you think you might need.

If you think that teaching your 10 year old about guns is "good enough" to keep him from playing with that loaded gun in your den....well...add ONE MORE layer of deterrent. (By the way...kids...no matter how educated...are still kids.)

1max2nv
March 10, 2011, 12:41 PM
I keep mine with out a round in the chamber.

ScottieG59
March 10, 2011, 06:30 PM
I have had to deal with this issue for years. I also know from experience that complex solutions often fail badly when stress is added to the mix. Experience has also shown me that I will get nervous when when forced into a life threatening situation. I can not count of being in top form.

This is not the same as when I was in the Army. I was able to remain calm and focused despite the incoming rounds. Maybe being with other armed soldiers helped. Also, our rules of engagement were not the same... we did not worry the police or prosecutors.

Somewhere, I try to find a workable solution that accounts for my 6 curious children, my anti-gun wife and my requirement to be ready.

I like big powerful service size firearms, but I also carry concealed during the day. For now, I carry my mouse gun (Kahr P380) and it is easy to keep it away from the kids and does not alarm the wife. When the kids are asleep and I go to bed, I get my Glock 20 out and keep it by my bed, in a container without a lock, and with the door locked.

I know the locked case would slow me down too much.

pickinatune
March 11, 2011, 11:19 AM
if not on my person, I keep an Auto in the night stand drawer with a the slide locked back and a mag sitting next to it. Train the kids not to touch the night stand at all, but in the event they do- they don't have a clue how to load the gun.

seamaster
March 11, 2011, 12:30 PM
Gunvault finger control access...............

seamaster
March 11, 2011, 12:32 PM
too many accidents around the world....lock those guns up around kids

Uteridge
March 11, 2011, 12:40 PM
One trick that my dad did for years was to put a couple of nails into the wall on the inside of the closet above the trim, wrap them in electrical tape, and store a gun up there. It is a good 7-8 feet off the ground and you would have to go inside the closet and look up to find it so it was even relatively safe in the event of a burglary. You could probably do the same thing with one of the pistol racks they make to go on the webbing of the door on my browning gun safe.

B yond
March 11, 2011, 10:57 PM
Quick-access electronic safe bolted to the headboard. No, not a lockbox, an actual safe. The rest of the guns are in a stack-on gun locker unloaded, except for the HD shotgun which is loaded with an empty chamber.

WardenWolf
March 11, 2011, 11:49 PM
Don't underestimate a child's ability to find stuff. putting guns up high is not sufficient unless you have a toddler, or a mature trained teenager. Any age in between you should have a safe. When I was a kid I was always looking around trying to see if my dad had a gun (he always said he didn't but for some reason I didn't believe him, he always seemed like he was hiding something) and when I was in my teens I was snoopin for pills and drugs. My parents never suspected anything, so even if your kids are trained don't trust them too much!

I didn't learn gun safety until I was about 15 and my over protective parents finally let me go shooting with my friends father, who taught me gun safety and how to shoot/handle firearms safely.

I now live near my family members, and my 10 year old cousin comes over to visit sometimes. He is quite immature for his age, and not trained in guns or gun safety at all, and he doesn't have respect for other peoples property.

He once told me how his friends dad had made his friend and him angry (don't remember why) so they went looking for his gun to "bend the barrel" he said. They found the gun but
luckily they could not find the ammo. and obviously they couldn't bend the barrel.. I scolded him for doing that but he did seem to get the message or understand the severity of the situation. To him it was a big joke.

I now have to keep a deadbolt on my bedroom door and my pistols in a lock box. I keep my door locked whenever I am not in it. I open the box at night for quick access to my guns.

I really wish my aunt and uncle would take some time to teach their kid gun safety and respect. They are both in the Army too, I shouldn't have to tell them to teach their kid gun safety and basic respect of others property.
So you're saying he's a brat BRAT. Which incidentally sounds like a burst from a machine gun.

There's no children in my home (I WAS the child, but I'm long an adult now) so it's not an issue here. I just keep my guns where it's convenient. Got a P-64 on my hip and a holstered Tokarev sitting next to me. My dad always kept them up high in the closet and I knew I was never to touch that shelf. If I had kids, though, I'd go with a biometric safe. Nice thing about those, besides fast access, is you can also set it up so multiple family members can access it. No keys, no combination, no problem.

TexasBill
March 12, 2011, 12:42 AM
One loaded on the hip; one in lockbox in my wife's nightstand. Others unloaded and locked up.

C5rider
March 12, 2011, 08:39 AM
time to chime in here. My dad built guns. We always had about 30 rifles stacked up in an open cabinet. We were going to the gun club with dad when we were about 8-years old. We were taught how to handle a gun safely and we were the wieird kids who told all of our friends that you NEVER point a gun at someone else, not even by accident, unless you intend on using it. We hunted and shot firearms all through my high-school years. It was nothing to grab my dad's 1914 Mauser and go out back for some plinking.

Through college and building a career, I got out of guns. I've now got two boys and I've debated long and hard about how to safely have both kids and guns in the house. I like one, I love the other.

I've always had my shotgun and one rifle that dad built for me but, when I bought another handgun, I also bought a safe to put it, and all my ammo into it. My oldest son goes to the range with me and shoots my 22lr revolver. My youngest (5 years old) shoots the bb gun. They're learning about guns and how to handle them. I've already considered that when they get old enough, shooting could easily become something that keeps us close. My dad went to the range the other day with me. The first time he's shot a gun in over 25 years. It would be neat to have both dad and my oldest son at the range, three generations of shooters.

Gun safety is a MUST, but each situation must be handled in a very personal, sober way. I've seen little kids that were safe around guns and teenagers that I wouldn't let handle a rubber band pistol.

gym
March 12, 2011, 01:25 PM
When any of my 4 grandkids are here, 1yr-8yrs old, the guns go in the safe. The one I carry stays with me. At night i sleep with it between the edge of the mattress, "unseen". You can't get it unless I roll to the side, or sit up. The kids never have seen a gun at my home, their patents are not gun people. Also they don't come in my bedroom unless I invite them. "wife's kids". I respect their wishes. To me both the son and son in law are whipped, they both like guns, but are afraid of their wives. Whipped like butter,
When they get older I will corrupt them, I can tell which one is the shooter already.

mdauben
March 12, 2011, 06:45 PM
On the nightstand in a biometrich safe.
I would agree with this one. From my own experience as a youngster, top shelf of closet, between the matresses, hidden in your underwere, there is no where in a normal house you can "hide" a gun that a determined child won't eventually find it. Safetly training and stern warnings are good, too, but children are children and are not always cognizent of the ramifications of their actions or their own mortality. Locking up all your guns is the only way to be sure they don't get their little hands on one. :o

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