Falling with a gun


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double bogey
March 9, 2011, 04:35 PM
Last night about 11:30 my dog was barking, so I picked up a flashlight and pistol and walked out to see what he was barking at. Now I live in a suburb, and its not unusual for my dog to bark, he can come in or out through a dog door. So when he continues to bark, I go check it out. So I sneak out my back door, flashlight in one hand and Glock in the other, about 5 steps out my eyes still not adjusted for the dark, I stepped right into a green plastic lawn chair that was laying upside down. Apparently my leg got tangled up on the arm hole, one chair leg got into my inner thigh just below my crotch, and anothe leg hung up under my left armpit. I tumbled and ended up twisted up in the lawn chair, gun pointed at my kitchen window after hitting the ground pretty hard. Thank God I practice trigger finger discipline, because when I was on the way down I don't have any idea which direction the gun pointed. I have no doubt that if my finger had been in the trigger guard, the gun would have discharged. My leg and arm are bruised pretty bad, and I am sore today. I still don't know what the dog was barking at, if it was a bad guy he got a good laugh and went on his way.

So everyone, keep your finger out of the trigger guard until you are ready to shoot. Oh, and turn on a light or use the flashlight thats in your hand.

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Owen Sparks
March 9, 2011, 04:59 PM
I posted a week or so back about accidentally touching an electric fence with a canned drink in my hand. My involuntary reaction was to clench my hand so hard that it crushed the can and squirted the drink everywhere. Had that drink been a gun and my finger been anywhere near the trigger, straight or not, it would have fired.

Be careful.

armoredman
March 9, 2011, 05:14 PM
Sorry, I just envisioned a Chevy Chase moment there.

tarosean
March 9, 2011, 05:25 PM
I posted a week or so back about accidentally touching an electric fence with a canned drink in my hand.


hmmmmm maybe you need to change your user name.

Owen Sparks
March 9, 2011, 05:26 PM
That is what it was like, I squeezed the can so violently that the majority of the drink landed on top of my head and shoulders. Since then I kept my index finger curled under the trigger guard on my AR or behind it on shotguns or actually wedged it behind the trigger of my big Ruger Redhawk effectively blocking it even if a stitch or something hung inside the trigger guard.

btg3
March 9, 2011, 05:31 PM
So I sneak out my back door, flashlight in one hand and Glock in the other, about 5 steps out my eyes still not adjusted for the dark, I stepped right into a green plastic lawn chair ...

If that lawn chair had been a bad guy, rattlesnake, or whatever your dog was barking at, your post might have a slightly different tale to tell.

If it was a person, their eyes would be already be adjusted and they would have an advantage. If you turned on the flashlight, they likely would still see you first. Might there have been a better approach to the situation?

Friendly, Don't Fire!
March 9, 2011, 05:33 PM
I recall falling once. I had my dad's .410 and the family was out on an island off the coast of Maine in the late 60's. The family would run around the islands, looking for lobster buoys, neat stuff washed up on shore, etc.

I was running and fell on a large ledge, my weight landing on the gun (all 93 pounds of me at around 13) and the left side of the stock and receiver of the bolt action single shot JC Higgins .410 got pretty dug up. Later, when we came home at the end of the summer, I refinished the stock and sanded the gouged receiver and re-blued the gouges.

That was the first and only time I ever fell with a gun.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
March 9, 2011, 05:36 PM
I stepped right into a green plastic lawn chair that was laying upside down.

Now you can laugh. It sounds like something that I would do, I'm glad you were only bruised and you didn't shoot a hole into your kitchen. And you came through it with no broken bones!

phoglund
March 9, 2011, 05:52 PM
What? No reconnaissance by fire? You suburbanites are such funny fellows! :neener:

Seriously though, it seems like having an uncluttered and/or mentally mapped property might be the best preventative for this sort of problem. Good job keeping trigger discipline!




Disclosure: My property is often somewhat cluttered and definately not mentally mapped.

.

longdayjake
March 9, 2011, 06:12 PM
The area I used to hunt alot was a lava field. When it would get a little layer of snow on it I was likely to fall two or three times in one day because the rocks would get slick or the snow would cover a crack that my foot would somehow find its way into. Though I never had a ND because of it, each time it happened I had more and more resolve to always anally enforce trigger discipline when around my friends.

Owen Sparks
March 9, 2011, 06:23 PM
I teach a martial arts class and part of learning how to throw people is learning how to fall safely. You want to spread the impact out over as much time and as much area as possible and not land suddenly on a small part of your body like an elbow or knee. Roll with it. Many untrained people will react to falling by clenching whatever is in their hands in a subconcious attempt to hang on to something. If that something has a trigger it will fire.

double bogey
March 9, 2011, 06:57 PM
Today I have moved some of the clutter, had a couple of words with my 5 yr. old grandson about leaving clutter. Made me think about it today. I go out and check noises mainly to keep alert and be ready for a situation. Probably won't go out in the dark without turning on the floodlight because I really can't sneak quietly outside anyway due to the door to get out is noisy. I like the doors noisy, it's also hard to sneak in without making noise. I can laugh about it today but I still hurt. It helps that I seem to know how to fall. Makes me think about the glock with no manual safety though. My 1911 would have had the safety on. Still would have my finger off the trigger too.

jonmerritt
March 9, 2011, 09:04 PM
ouch, glad all is ok.

xcgates
March 9, 2011, 09:24 PM
I have to second Owen Sparks here. As odd as it sounds, I remember one particularly awesome fall when I was running in high school (I ran cross country). It involved taking a 90 degree turn, encountering a patch of ice, and somehow managing to tuck-n-roll, and end up right back on my feet, even facing approximately the right direction. I didn't even get a serious bruise. Part of that is because when I'm actively training, while I don't regularly fall, I'm more aware of my body, and even though I don't fall, I probably tumble more than people who aren't active.

Heck, one time I tripped in the woods and went down into a classic pushup position, *not* rolling with it. I'm still not sure why I did, but when I looked down, there was a rather nasty looking, sharp and sturdy broken stump just a few inches from the center of my chest. That would have been pretty nasty.

I'm not saying you have to be a fitness guru (Lord know I'm not right now), but some familiarity with falling (as odd as that sounds) is not a bad thing. Was actually a somewhat important thing when I did nordic skiing as well, because you had to be aware of your equipment, and control things (mostly) so you limited the damage to both your body, and your equipment.

In this case, your body and your gun.

Ringer
March 9, 2011, 09:37 PM
This post caught my attention because I took a tumble a bout a week ago on some thin black ice on my front steps. My leg is still swollen. Was on my way to work carrying a laptop over my shoulder. I was also carrying in my hands a holstered G19 a banana and a cell phone. I hit the second step going down my concrete walk and my feet immediately went out from under me to the left. No chance to tuck and roll. My right thigh hit hard on the retaining wall next to my steps. Glock went bouncing down the remaining steps. I got up, picked everything up and off to work.

I don't consider myself inactive but I should have done a better job at spotting the ice. The sidewalk and steps mostly just looked wet.

Anyway good job keeping finger off the trigger. Falling, sometimes it happens.

Cosmoline
March 9, 2011, 10:06 PM
e continues to bark, I go check it out. So I sneak out my back door, flashlight in one hand and Glock in the other, about 5 steps out my eyes still not adjusted for the dark, I stepped right into a green plastic lawn chair that was laying upside down

Why didn't you have your flashlight on? I think this is a classic example of why folks should pay more attention to basics rather than getting worried about some ninjas aiming for the light. If you can't see where you're going, either turn on the light or don't go there.

CZguy
March 9, 2011, 10:44 PM
I was also carrying in my hands a holstered G19 a banana and a cell phone.

Somehow when I read this, I started laughing.

I'm glad you are recovering, and the OP as well.

xcgates
March 9, 2011, 10:54 PM
Defense, food, and communications, looks like he had the basics covered!

Onmilo
March 9, 2011, 11:51 PM
Don't go looking for the bad guy.
Let them come to you.

jbr
March 9, 2011, 11:58 PM
I've got to remember my banana in the morning

788Ham
March 10, 2011, 12:00 AM
He didn't say anything about his mashed 'nanner either! :cuss:

ZeSpectre
March 10, 2011, 12:03 AM
Don't go looking for the bad guy.
Let them come to you.

Yeah, when the dog "alerts" me to something at night, my reaction is to go into "hunter" mode where I try to be as still as possible and listen/watch for any possible sound or motion. I've found it works a lot better than rattling around like the 3'rd tank battalion.

CZguy
March 10, 2011, 12:10 AM
Yeah, when the dog "alerts" me to something at night, my reaction is to go into "hunter" mode where I try to be as still as possible and listen/watch for any possible sound or motion. I've found it works a lot better than rattling around like the 3'rd tank battalion.


Yep, I learned a long time ago that when you stay in the foxhole you live. When you get aggressive and get out of the foxhole you can get shot.

Owen Sparks
March 10, 2011, 12:39 AM
There is an old military axiom from Napoleans time which states "One entrenched man will cost you three." Meaning that a soldier firing from cover has a three to one advantage. My plan is to seek cover behind somethig solid and let the bad guy come to me.

Oldfalguy
March 10, 2011, 01:13 AM
Last year I was drinking Crown one night...............
Yep, first mistake...
"Decided" to go see if I could spot any skunks that had been leaving a bit of stink behind them.
Suppressed Ruger+ night vision out the door-
Was under a porch on uneven ground (=quite a slope 35 degrees)
Well duh I slipped, feet went downhill, sideways- finger off trigger arm extended, hand up.
No shots fired-
Went to bed, woke up with pillow stuck to head- had split my melon open and bled like a stuck pig-
Wife not happy with the state of the sheets- my head hurt too-
Never again............I hopeI blame that on tainted ice in the Crown.

Tim the student
March 10, 2011, 01:37 AM
I've fallen quite a bit carrying rifles for Uncle Sugar. It happens. Trigger discipline and muzzle awareness are key. Another key is letting yourself fall, and not trying to fight it too hard - worse stuff can happen when you try to reach out and grab something etc etc.

joshk-k
March 10, 2011, 01:47 AM
I was hunting in ORegon's Coast Range in the fall of 2009. I was descending into a steep ravine, carrying a .30-30 lever action with two hands. There was around chambered and the safety was on. The ground cover were 2'-3' high ferns that obscured the actual terrain. I misstepped and fell head over heels tumbling down the hillside. I went maybe ten feet or so before some vegetation stopped me. It was a big wake-up call for me: When I am out in the woods by myself, I need to be sure of every step I take. I was glad that the gun didn't discharge (or get banged up, for that matter).

Josh

Ala Dan
March 10, 2011, 02:12 AM
Just recently I fell approximately 3 feet to a wooden floor at work, from a
ladder while retrieving an empty long gun box. I landed directly on my right
hip pocket, where my KEL-TEC P3AT .380 was stored. Needless to say, I was
more worried a'bout damaging the weapon; than hurting myself. As it turned
out, we both survived the fall too live another day. The P3AT still functions
as good as new~! :o ;) :D

Ringer
March 10, 2011, 07:45 PM
Just for the record, the banana survived and was consumed upon arriving at work.

VT Deer Hunter
March 10, 2011, 08:12 PM
WOW that was a close one but its good that your muscles remember to stay off the trigger.

Kim
March 11, 2011, 12:00 AM
My most favorite Chemistry teacher in college (very tall guy) was out hunting with a shotgun and had another professor with him. He tripped fell and shot himself in the upper chest area and died. It was horrible.

Mags
March 11, 2011, 12:02 AM
Here is a story in which a SWAT team member falls during a raid and kills someone.

http://bostonherald.com/news/regional/view.bg?articleid=1307685&srvc=home&position=active

jkittle99
March 11, 2011, 12:38 AM
Glad I'm not the only one who's had this experience. A few weeks ago I slipped on some nasty ice, coming right down on my holstered firearm. Left a nice bruise, but the little plastic LCP survived :) Luckily I wasn't in midst of a 'situation' with weapon in hand. Brings up a good point about basic safety procedures we learn early on (hopefully!). I wouldn't have done anything differently (except maybe choosing not to go near the ice..)

M91/30
March 11, 2011, 01:05 AM
An unfortunate event glad there was no firearm related accident, Bet youll remember this and forever use trigger discipline. But can you imagine if someone had a video or picture of you tangled up in a chair holding a glock and a flash light? Im still convinced though that lawn chairs are actually a device used to catch people in the dark, ive seen many people wrapped up like you were and even more who had a late night trip over one.

Dr.Rob
March 11, 2011, 01:13 AM
Anyone who has hunted in foul weather (mud, snow, ice, rain, etc) or hunted for a long period of time has stumbled or taken a fall.

Trigger disciplne saves lives.

ants
March 11, 2011, 01:17 AM
So I sneak out my back door, flashlight in one hand and Glock in the other hand...I am curious what the flashlight was for? :neener:

leadcounsel
March 11, 2011, 06:12 AM
Great job with finger discipline.

I too had a funny Chevy Chase moment in mind!

Need some work on perimeter defense and home defense training. If you can so easily be tackled and taken out of commission by a lawn chair, how would you have been able to resist a real assailant!?

The other lesson here is situational awareness. By going outside you expose yourself in a fatal funnel. Someone setting up an ambush, or even observing your 'react to contact' drills, sees you're an easy target. And what happens when you are subdued in your backyard? Now your whole family is at risk...

Reconsider your tactics.

double bogey
March 11, 2011, 09:28 PM
Need some work on perimeter defense and home defense training. If you can so easily be tackled and taken out of commission by a lawn chair, how would you have been able to resist a real assailant!?



I was thinking about this while laying on the ground trying to figure out if anything was broke. I also knew it was a lawn chair immediatly, but still couldn't do anything about it and rode it down.

sm
March 11, 2011, 10:04 PM
I am in the camp of changing your user name, to Chevy Chase.

*all-in-good-fun-of-course*

double bogey
March 12, 2011, 03:33 PM
For some critical of my tactics, remember I had my dog outside, and he had been there 10 mins or so. He's not a guard dog, but he is a Brittany. He has better night vision, smells better, and hears far better than me. I was pretty sure no one was in my yard, the way he runs the whole yard, It would suprise me if anyone could hide from him.

In any event, I am glad I can laugh about it now, and provide a little comic relief for all here. I am definately looking at my tactics. Thanks for all of the encouraging words all.

ShroomFish
March 12, 2011, 03:53 PM
was hunting with my granddad in Va one time with a Winchester 25 12GA.. Tripped bit the dust, fingers were not near the trigger thought

DammitBoy
March 12, 2011, 04:09 PM
Step one: Leave the outdoor floods on

Step two: Don't get out of the boat

Owen Sparks
March 12, 2011, 05:03 PM
I took my Mom to the local orthopedic specialist for a rotator cuff problem a while back and there was a guy in the waiting room in a wheel chair. We were talking to pass the time and he said that he was deer hunting with his
.30-06 and chasing a wounded buck. it somehow got snaged in brush by the trigger guard and it yanked it out of his hand. It discharged shooting him in the back bend of the leg and blew his knee OFF. At the time he still did not know if he was going to be able to keep his leg.

NMGonzo
March 12, 2011, 08:31 PM
Yep, I learned a long time ago that when you stay in the foxhole you live. When you get aggressive and get out of the foxhole you can get shot.

I am going to let them come to the bedroom door.

I have 2 .380's by the bedside so If I shoot I will be able to hear again.

rfwobbly
March 12, 2011, 09:50 PM
Mr Bogey -
I feel for you, brother. Falls after 50 yo are no fun, and the bumps and scars on shins take forever to heal. Your going to carry a small reminder for about a year.

All the best.

pbearperry
March 12, 2011, 10:04 PM
Pretty much most of us including myself have done something we wish we did different.I am glad you survived this and learned something from it.Flood the backyard with light before exiting or maybe stay inside where it's safe.I have nothing in my back yard worth getting hurt bad or killed over.

gym
March 13, 2011, 04:07 PM
Stuff happens, I have fallen, running after the mailman etc. It is more embarrasing than nanything else. All the times I fell I was armed. No time did I feel that I had a "close call". I hurt myself and that was more the object of my anger. Bad back equals occasional trip down memory lane, or Avenue. I did make sure that the weapons didn't suffer any damage or problems afterwards. I advise a thouough check after an incident dropping or falling on a weapon. Sometimes even a little fall can dislodge something. Hope you are ok.

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