Notably accurate out of box factory rifles in .260?


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Mark-Smith
March 9, 2011, 08:44 PM
Are there any notably accurate out of box factory rifles chambered in .260 rem?

Any in the sub $1,000 range?

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BoilerUP
March 9, 2011, 08:55 PM
I'm gonna guess Savage's new 11LRH (dunno if they are on shelves yet or not) will easily fit into the accurate & affordable .260 category...

Mark-Smith
March 9, 2011, 09:21 PM
If it hasn't been tested yet, how would it be 'notably accurate out of the box'?

NCsmitty
March 9, 2011, 10:14 PM
how would it be 'notably accurate out of the box'?

It's a Savage!

Choices are slim when talking about the 260 Rem.



NCsmitty

Mark-Smith
March 9, 2011, 10:17 PM
It's a Savage!

Aieee! Fanboys! Run!

No, but seriously, I've shot my friend's Savage rifle in .223, it's a well made machine.

The ones I've heard good things about are Tikka, Savage and Howa, but I'm not sure what else is out there in the sub $1,000 range.

kis2
March 9, 2011, 10:47 PM
...I believe there is one in the retail section right now...

Mark-Smith
March 9, 2011, 11:09 PM
I had been hoping for first hand advice from people who had a rifle chambered in that and 'Yeah, this rifle is terrible' or 'this rifle is amazing' etc.

nathan
March 9, 2011, 11:39 PM
CZs and Tikkas.

Mark-Smith
March 9, 2011, 11:50 PM
CZs and Tikkas.

Do you... Own... Either of those?

25cschaefer
March 9, 2011, 11:54 PM
I have shot a Ruger Hawkeye with a pretty short barrel, it was a mountain style gun with lam stock and stainless barrel, it shot 3/4 inch and better at 100yds. I believe they cost between $700 and $800.

R.W.Dale
March 10, 2011, 12:31 AM
You know caliber really doesn't enter into this equation right?

You're really just asking the same tired old question of "most accurate rifle under 1k" and then just finding the ones offering chambering in .260

IF accuracy is all that matters I'd personally build one on a savage target action, a McGowan or shillen bbl and the stock of your choice. Before I sunk a grand on a luck of the draw factory barrel.




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benzy2
March 10, 2011, 12:32 AM
How much effort do you want to put in? If it were me, with the selection of .260 factory rifles out there, I would go one of two ways. I would either pick up a Savage 11FCNS available today for $556 shipped from Buds or go custom build on a Savage action if a heavy barrel was desired. Start with a stevens rifle in .308 or .243 so you don't need a new bolt face. Then pick up a SSS competition trigger for $100, a SSS stock of your choice for $325, and drop in Shilen Stainless Select Match barrel in .260 for $340. It may push you a little past the $1k mark, but it will shoot with that stock, barrel, and trigger.

snake284
March 10, 2011, 06:54 AM
I would say any Savage product is going to be accurate out of the box, mainly due to that butt ugly barrel nutt and the floating bolt head. The Barrel nutt permits almost perfect head spacing and the floating bolt head allows for almost perfect alignment to the bore. Both of these are very conducive to accuracy. A Remington can be made very accurate in the hands of a good machinist if he reems the head space right and trues up or blue prints the action. In fact if that's the case, I prefer the Remington over about any action. But off the production line, the chances of all that happening these days is slim to none. I really prefer the Remington because of its inherent strength. IT has those three rings of steel uniterupted around the case head, the action is very rigid, and it has a lightening fast lock time. But for out of the box accuracy and value, you cannot beat the Savage.

BoilerUP
March 10, 2011, 08:07 AM
Okay...

I own a Remington 700 Mountain LSS in .260, and for an ultralight hunting rifle with a thin-contour 22" barrel, I can put 3 shots inside a dime at 100yd with 120 Nosler BTs and a moderate load of H380 and I'm a fairly lousy shot.

But they haven't been made in a few years...

R.W.Dale
March 10, 2011, 08:22 AM
Okay...

I own a Remington 700 Mountain LSS in .260, and for an ultralight hunting rifle with a thin-contour 22" barrel, I can put 3 shots inside a dime at 300yd with 120 Nosler BTs and a moderate load of H380 and I'm a fairly lousy shot.

But they haven't been made in a few years...

No offense but don't you think this sounds a LITTLE far fetched?

A mountain rifle that'll hold well under sub quarter MOA out to 300 with a shooter who's a self proclaimed "lousy shot"


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BoilerUP
March 10, 2011, 08:28 AM
YES - my apologies - didn't want to mislead anybody so thank you for pointing that out!

I truly meant 100yd...not sure why the hell I typed 300. I've never actually shot ANY rifle that far!

Regardless, I find that accuracy at 100yd from a thin-barrel hunting rifle to be quite commendable.

bailer
March 10, 2011, 08:32 AM
The Tikka comes in .260 and 6.5x55. I've had such good luck with my 06, that I'm planning on setting up one for my oldest son when he turns ten. I'll probably go with the Swede, since I have the dies and the Tikka only comes in a long action.

R.W.Dale
March 10, 2011, 08:36 AM
YES - my apologies - didn't want to mislead anybody so thank you for pointing that out!

I truly meant 100yd...not sure why the hell I typed 300. I've never actually shot ANY rifle that far!

Regardless, I find that accuracy at 100yd from a thin-barrel hunting rifle to be quite commendable.

As would I and quite believable too from a good shootin iron.

Carry on


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6.5swede
March 11, 2011, 01:59 PM
I can vouch for the Tikka T3 in 6.5x55. I have 2 and both were tack drivers out of the box and with factory ammo! Their 260 has the same twist 1:8 but I have no personal experience with it.

FLNT4EVR
March 11, 2011, 04:18 PM
Remington CDL Model 7 ,An excellent rifle . Very light and easy to carry, I can shoot 2 inch groups at 200 YDS, and I know the rifle will do better, but with my eyes and other physical problems, I can't. The biggest reason for this rifle not being more popular is because the light barrel heats up too fast for most people, who are just out for a days shooting..When sighting in you have to let the barrel cool after 2 or three shots. BUT, in a hunting situation when would you ever need more than three aimed shots , and need them to group under 3-4 inches at 200 yds.

sixgunner455
June 20, 2011, 07:33 PM
Savage 16FCSS 260 REM ACS DBM

Should be as accurate as any other Savage in its price range - read, very good.

Mark-Smith
June 20, 2011, 08:14 PM
How does it compare to a Tikka T3 Super Varmit? They're both in about the same price range, both come in .260 variants, etc. Anything that makes one better than the other?

sixgunner455
June 21, 2011, 11:05 PM
Don't know that much about the Tikka, and the only Savage I've fired was in .308. My cousin has a Tikka in .30-06 and loves it.

.260 is a very interesting cartridge to me, but I *think* I'm gonna get a .243 this year.

Personally, I'd try to get my hands on examples of the guns I was interested in. Beyond a certain point, the feel is the most important thing. Does it fit you? Do you like holding it? Do you like cycling the action? Do the sights fall to a good place for you? Do you like the length of pull, do you like the trigger, do you like the safety arrangement?

Limey46
June 22, 2011, 10:18 AM
I had a stainless/synthetic Remington Model Seven in .260 that shot very well indeed. Pretty rare, but another viable option.

Coal Dragger
June 22, 2011, 01:02 PM
Well I can't vouch for the .260 Remington chamber in a Savage barrel, but a very good friend of mine recently had Savage put together a 6.5X.284 in their Model 12 target action with a 30" bbl and the HS precision stock that they offer. That particular rifle shoots very very well. Easily under 1/2 MOA.

Zak Smith
June 22, 2011, 02:37 PM
Euro Optics has a batch of Sako TRG-22's in .260 right now. You can also buy an AE or AW with a .260 barrel.

Coal Dragger
June 22, 2011, 02:39 PM
Are you going to spot the guy the extra $2000-$4000 he will need to buy either of those to keep his costs at or below $1000?

Mark-Smith
June 22, 2011, 02:44 PM
Yes, Zak is so kind to us long range n00bs that he's even started a gun lending library just for us! Heloooo Sako TRG!

But seriously though, until that happens, my budget for the gun is at $1,000.

Zak Smith
June 22, 2011, 02:53 PM
Obviously an answer to the first question and not the second.

Coal Dragger
June 22, 2011, 03:30 PM
Fair enough. In your experience how would answer question number 1, within the stipulation of question number 2?

Zak Smith
June 22, 2011, 03:36 PM
If spending my own money I'd look at the Tikka T3 and the Savage.

Mark-Smith
June 22, 2011, 04:40 PM
Are there any Tikka T3 or Savage long range shooters here?

Zak Smith
June 22, 2011, 04:42 PM
I have a T3 in the safe, but its barrel is not factory and I haven't shot it yet-- upcoming article gun.

6.5swede
June 23, 2011, 12:58 PM
I recently traded for a Sako 85 SS/Syn 260. It is the most accurate factory rifle with several different loads/bullets that I've ever owned!

Mark-Smith
June 24, 2011, 05:55 AM
I recently traded for a Sako 85 SS/Syn 260. It is the most accurate factory rifle with several different loads/bullets that I've ever owned!

How much would it have run you without the trade in?

bigedp51
June 24, 2011, 11:52 AM
Rifle accuracy is controlled by barrel vibrations.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/e1-bare-movie.gif

Ten rifles made by the same company in the same caliber will shoot ten different size groups.

The most accurate rifle "OUT OF THE BOX" I ever owned was a Winchester model 70 feather weight. This rifle came with the BOSS adjustable tuning weight attached to the end of the barrel. First time to the range and three adjustments later the rifle was shooting 1/2 inch groups at 100 yards.

A non-reloader can try different types and brands of ammo to see what shoots the best.

A reloader can vary and change the amount of powder in the case to get the best accuracy.

On a military rifle with issued ammunition you "tune" the rifle to shoot that ammunition accurately.

Stock Savage/Stevens rifles are noted for their out of the box accuracy, they can be customized and "tuned" to shoot even more accurately. And they cost half the price as their competitors.

On any rifle just changing the torque value of the action screws can be used to "tune" a rifle.

Below is the most common way for the factory to "tune" their rifles, up pressure at the fore end tip controls barrel vibrations and thus accuracy.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/308mode3.gif

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/RSbedding_0303D.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/RSbedding_0303E.jpg

The up pressure points above are no different than my model 70 with BOSS and are used to control barrel vibrations.

You can drive any new car off the lot and cross your fingers that you don't get a lemon, but you just don't know until you drive it............

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