Grip Safety issues?


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Carbonator
March 13, 2011, 09:54 PM
Referring to the grip safety lever on the back strap of the grip such as those found on XD's, 1911's, and some revolvers... Has a grip safety ever prevented you from pulling the trigger when you wanted to? Perhaps you didn't have a perfect grip to disengage the safety to fire, or the grip safety mechanism itself failed or broke...

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altitude_19
March 13, 2011, 11:12 PM
I got the impression the safety on my XD is designed to be quite forgiving. I have purposely handled it with a VERY sloppy grip, and it still goes off. You have to pretty much eliminate contact with the backstrap for it not to work, otherwise the weight of the gun pushing the grip down in your hand is enough to make it work.

AOK
March 13, 2011, 11:45 PM
Last year I read a story about guy that got in a gun fight and he had a 1911 (I believe I read it on AR15.com website). He got shot in the hand which naturally made his hand very bloody. He got off a hand full of shots but eventually couldn't fire anymore. Luckily the assailant ran off. The gun owner believes it was because he couldn't get a positive grip and as a result couldn't depress the grip safety. I'm not saying this is common, but it is possible.

One of the main reason's I wouldn't carry a firearm for self defense with a grip safety is for fighting at "bad breath" distances. If you have your firearm muzzle in direct contact with the assailant there is a possibility the gun could get pushed out of battery. If this happen you may need to hold the slide in place to get a shot off into the assailant. With a grip safety you have to take your off hand and hold the slide in place, whereas a gun without a grip safety you can firmly put your thumb behind the slide and get you shot off. (No it won't take you thumb off or hurt it if you you do it correctly, I've done it numerous times with my Glock 23's). Personally if we are in tight quarters I want to keep my off hand as free as much as possible for defensive and striking purposes.

chris in va
March 14, 2011, 03:24 AM
Has a grip safety ever prevented you from pulling the trigger when you wanted to?

Yes, on an XD9 I had. My hands are large and to reliably disengage the safety I needed to really squeeze the grip hard. Sold it a couple months later.

Silent Sam
March 14, 2011, 04:30 AM
"If you have your firearm muzzle in direct contact with the assailant there is a possibility the gun could get pushed out of battery." If this is of concern, I would submit a double action revolver is a much better solution than holding a slide with your shooting hand thumb, or any thumb for that matter. Wouldn't be a decision point for me against using a semi w/ a grip safety.

OneBagNomad
March 14, 2011, 07:20 AM
I was never a fan of a grip safety. Really is unnecessary if you follow basic firearm safety and it's just an additional part that can break or interfere with me firing my weapon when I need to.

Hk Dan
March 14, 2011, 08:43 AM
I've seen it happen in USPSA and IDPA. Turn the pressure up and who knows what your hands are going to do?

AOK
March 14, 2011, 09:02 AM
"If you have your firearm muzzle in direct contact with the assailant there is a possibility the gun could get pushed out of battery." If this is of concern, I would submit a double action revolver is a much better solution than holding a slide with your shooting hand thumb, or any thumb for that matter. Wouldn't be a decision point for me against
using a semi w/ a grip safety.

It's a part of the decision for me in addition to the safety being unnecessary in general. Your right, the revolver would solve this problem in that situation, however I'm not a wheel guy for multiple reasons unless it's a BUG. To each his own. No firearm is perfect.

Winkman822
March 14, 2011, 09:56 AM
The only time I had issues with one of my 1911s not firing with the grip safety disengaged was with a Series II Kimber Custom Royal, though the issue was with the Kimber firing pin block rather than the gripsafety itself (slightly out of timing).

As far as the gun not firing when out of battery with the gun pressed against the target, in my experience NO autoloader will fire if the gun is out of battery.

If you like the ergonomics of the 1911 buy don't care for the grip safety, ship the gun to Novak's and they have a beavertail/backstrap conversion that completely defeats the grip safety.

2WheelsGood
March 14, 2011, 10:16 AM
in my experience NO autoloader will fire if the gun is out of battery.Nor would you want it to.

I don't have much experience with a 1911, but on an XDM it takes so little pressure to deactivate the grip safety, I truly can't imagine how it could be a problem. Basically you'd have to hold the gun in such a way that it would fly out of your hand if it did fire.

ForumSurfer
March 14, 2011, 10:41 AM
If you have your firearm muzzle in direct contact with the assailant there is a possibility the gun could get pushed out of battery. If this happen you may need to hold the slide in place to get a shot off into the assailant. With a grip safety you have to take your off hand and hold the slide in place, whereas a gun without a grip safety you can firmly put your thumb behind the slide and get you shot off.I'm confused and not trying to be argumentative.

If we are fighting up close and I've got the muzzle in your gut, wouldn't my other hand be tied up with fighting you? And if it is...what exactly is holding the weapon in my hand while you are pushing against it with your body weight? If my thumb is on the slide with enough force to keep it in battery with your body weight against it, it will be hard to pull the trigger.

Two handed grip, sure...I can see it. But I'm having a hard time picturing a scenario that would have me putting a gun in someone's body cavity with a two handed grip while fighting face to face. I don't have large hands, so once I move my thumb it is going to be next to impossible to manipulate the trigger given that there is a hug amount of force pushing in the same direction and only my thumb offering resistance.

Edit:: No, I've been shooting since my pre-teen years and I've never had a grip safety incident that prevented firing. But I've also never been in a life or death struggle while trying to manipulate a handgun.

InkEd
March 14, 2011, 11:06 AM
On the Xd platform, the guide rod sticks out slightly just past the muzzle. This feature allows you to put the gun right up to something, pull the trigger and still have it cycle properly. The grip safety on it has never given me a problem. If it wasn't there, I would care either way.

The 1911 has one too and it has always been reliable for me. However, I forgotten to engage or disengage the manual thumb safety lever.

The only times that I have personally seen problems with grip safeties on either of those two platforms, it was with 1911s with flat mainspring housings. The XD grip and 1911 with an arched mainspring housing are contoured to basically "make you hold it right" with a good high grip.

In regards to revolvers with grip safeties, I find them a little bit overkill and never bothered actually owning one. Then there is the H&K P7 that has it's front grip squeeze cocker design. I played around with one a few times and it felt very unnatural and that was the end of my experiences with it. (Plus, I feel a gun that size and weight should be either a higher capacity or larger caliber.)

Just One Shot
March 14, 2011, 11:16 AM
I've had this problem with the XD line of handguns (I've owned at least 5) but not the 1911's. I've never had the grip safety itself malfunction but due to the size and shape of my hand I have had instances at the range where the XD would not fire when practicing a hurried draw.

The Grip safety is too short and too narrow for my grip. I have a gap in the web of my hand that makes me have to readjust my grip even though I have a good purchase on the XD. I have traded or sold all my XD's over the years because I don't trust them to go bang every time.

The sad thing is, I like the guns. It's such a simple fix. All they would need to do is widen the safety and make it slightly longer like a 1911 and the problem would be gone. I've even posted this on the XD site but it's still an ongoing issue for me.

I would suggest that anyone considering an XD or XDM to shoot one before purchasing it, especially if it's going into your CC rotation.

InkEd
March 14, 2011, 11:30 AM
First, I would suggest you try an XD(m) with either the smallest or largest backstrap in place. This could fix the problem for you and you could enjoy shooting them.

Another simple solution is to get a Hogue slip on grip that covers the grip safety and keeps it depressed at all times. This isn't a problem because you still have the trigger saftey and the safety between your ears.

Lastly, I don't know if any makes them but perhaps you could find or have someone make a flared grip safety (with the lit bump at the bottom) like you see on alot of 1911s.

AOK
March 14, 2011, 11:44 AM
As far as the gun not firing when out of battery with the gun pressed against the target, in my experience NO autoloader will fire if the gun is out of battery.



This is correct, however you may be able to simply push it back into battery. If you have a grip safety this requires two hands. If you don't have a grip safety you may only need your hand you are holding the gun with.

Winkman822
March 14, 2011, 12:00 PM
This is correct, however you may be able to simply push it back into battery. If you have a grip safety this requires two hands. If you don't have a grip safety you may only need your hand you are holding the gun with.
Assuming the situation is as referenced in the post raising the out of battery issue, simply moving the weapon away from what it is in contact with ought to put the gun back in battery assuming that the gun is in good repair (i.e. recoil springs have plenty of life left in them and the gun is clean/properly lubed and loaded with good ammo).

AOK
March 14, 2011, 12:02 PM
I'm confused and not trying to be argumentative.

If we are fighting up close and I've got the muzzle in your gut, wouldn't my other hand be tied up with fighting you? And if it is...what exactly is holding the weapon in my hand while you are pushing against it with your body weight? If my thumb is on the slide with enough force to keep it in battery with your body weight against it, it will be hard to pull the trigger.

Two handed grip, sure...I can see it. But I'm having a hard time picturing a scenario that would have me putting a gun in someone's body cavity with a two handed grip while fighting face to face. I don't have large hands, so once I move my thumb it is going to be next to impossible to manipulate the trigger given that there is a hug amount of force pushing in the same direction and only my thumb offering resistance.

Edit:: No, I've been shooting since my pre-teen years and I've never had a grip safety incident that prevented firing. But I've also never been in a life or death struggle while trying to manipulate a handgun.

The link is an example of how the firearm can be held while keeping the gun in battery. The first couple shot this guy placed the base of his thumb firmly behind the slide. He is having no problem pressing the trigger. This technique can't be performed if you have a grip safety. The last couple shots demonstrates him taking his off hand to hold the slide in place. This is the technique that would have to be performed if you have a grip safety which gives up your off hand momentarily that could be used for striking for defense. Who knows, your off hand may be even pinned so you would not be even able to hold the slide.

http://m.youtube.com/index?desktop_uri=%2F&gl=US#/watch?xl=xl_blazer&v=Gw8sbb8eDjg

2WheelsGood
March 14, 2011, 12:08 PM
The link is an example of how the firearm can be held while keeping the gun in battery.Although your link isn't working, I really can't imagine how that works. If you put pressure on the slide from the back with your thumb, your thumb is going to be pretty torn up after the first shot. And if your thumb absorbs much of the recoil, the next round isn't going to chamber anyway. Seriously, if you're that worried about it, you need a revolver.

AOK
March 14, 2011, 12:13 PM
Assuming the situation is as referenced in the post raising the out of battery issue, simply moving the weapon away from what it is in contact with ought to put the gun back in battery assuming that the gun is in good repair (i.e. recoil springs have plenty of life left in them and the gun is clean/properly lubed and loaded with good ammo).

Certainly possible, if there isn't someone or something behind you keeping you from doing that. I don't mean to "what if" this to death. Obviously we could do that all day. Bottom line is IMHO this is a short fall with the grip safety. As they say many gun fights are within a few feet and many fights end up on the ground. If that happens for some reason its a good technique to be familiar with and have in the tool bag.

2WheelsGood
March 14, 2011, 12:19 PM
As they say many gun fights are within a few feet and many fights end up on the ground.The 1911 is the most copied and most successful semi-auto design ever. Used for many years by both the military and the police. And with the military especially, these are the guys who REALLY use the guns day in and day out. If the grip safety was really a shortcoming, the design would have been changed a long time ago.

rcmodel
March 14, 2011, 12:20 PM
Never had a problem in over 50 years of shooting 1911's, XD's, and other grip safety equipped guns.

The only grip safety I ever did have a problem with was with the Browning 1922 .380.
The grip safety on them is hinged at the bottom rather then the top, and is powered by a stiff flat spring that also powers the trigger, sear, and everything else.

It takes a gorilla grip all the time to keep a 1922 Browning grip safety fully depressed.
And my hand has all the meat in all the wrong places.

As for pushing the gun out of battery?
If that happens you got too close and used the wrong technique to fend off the attacker.

Oh BTW: An out of battery 1911 can be pushed back in battery with the thumb of the shooting hand, just like any other auto pistol. But if it stays out of battery and has to be pushed back shut when you pull it away from the BG, you probably should have your gun repaired, because it isn't working right.

rc

AOK
March 14, 2011, 12:22 PM
Although your link isn't working, I really can't imagine how that works. If you put pressure on the slide from the back with your thumb, your thumb is going to be pretty torn up after the first shot. And if your thumb absorbs much of the recoil, the next round isn't going to chamber anyway. Seriously, if you're that worried about it, you need a revolver.


Hmmm, link works for me. If you do it correctly your thumb wont even move an
inch. With that said, you are correct you wont chamber a round. However I'd rather inject one round into my assailant than none. Wouldn't you?

I'm not worried, I've just been taught through instruction that this situation could arrise and this is one way to handle it. Nothing more than that. Again, I would only carry a revolver as a BUG versus my current EDC.

AOK
March 14, 2011, 12:29 PM
As for pushing the gun out of battery?
If that happens you got to close and used the wrong technique to fend off the attacker.

Oh BTW: An out of battery 1911 can be pushed back in battery with the thumb

rc

Excellent point!

In regards to the 1911, I would think that would be pretty tough depending on the beaver tail/grip angle. Would you be holding the slide in place with the top of your thumb or down at the base of your thumb?

Drail
March 14, 2011, 09:28 PM
Grip safeties can be adjusted for required movement before release. Most don't require it. Some absolutely do. The problem is not the design or the concept of the grip safety - it's the execution of its manufacture and fitting. Companies that throw guns together like cheap toasters will happily sell you a gun that needs some work done. (Or they'll tell you to keep shooting it til it "breaks in".

earlthegoat2
March 14, 2011, 09:40 PM
In Ed Lovette's book The Snubby Revolver there is mention of an unwounded person not able to engage the grip safety on their 1911. They eventually resolved the issue but there you go. The grip safety is the number one detriment of the 1911 in my opinion and is the reason I would rather be in the company of such pistols as a Browning Hi Power (which has a mag interlock) so it has to be a CZ-75.

Usually it is a revovler though. Without a lemon squeezer safety.

Manco
March 14, 2011, 10:07 PM
I've never actually had a functional issue with any grip safety, but I still don't like the feel (mushy and variable) and the whole idea of a grip with a moving part that I have to operate (even though it's automatic). It just seems like one more unnecessary thing that could somehow unexpectedly go wrong.

jojo200517
March 14, 2011, 10:44 PM
I'll take a grip safety over a magazine disconnect any day of the week. I have been known to accidentally release a magazine or 2 when shooting. Never had a grip safety on anything I have shot stop me from making it go bang. Now if I got shot in the hand I could see it being a problem like the guy in the ar15.com story.

But to be honest unless you got shot in BOTH hands you shouldn't be totally out of the fight. Everyone should practice shooting in many different methods. I see people that only shoot one stance every time I go to the range and think I'm crazy when I shoot right handed only and then switch to left hand. I don't claim to be nearly as good with either as a 2 hand grip but I can usually hit what i'm shooting at enough to get me by and have fun.

As for so close that the gun gets pushed out of battery and will not fire, well it may have been a few seconds past the time you should have already fired. Like others have said tho, functional gun, good working order, good ammo and it should go back into battery when pressure is released from muzzle. I'd go for yank my arm back and squeeze down on trigger at the same time. I suppose if my arm couldn't move back for some reason I could put all my force into shoving it forward with all my might concentrating the pressure on the relatively smaller space of the muzzle first then yanking it back and squeezing on the bang switch.

Then again I never been in a battle like this and hope to never be just my theory.

I have a theory about those supposed struggles where the bad guy is overpowering ya and got ya hand still holding the gun shoved skyward. My theory is EMPTY THE DANG THING. At least that way if he does manage to overpower me and get it he has an empty gun. I'll still have my spare mag if I start winning the struggle and still need the gun. I guess in this kind of situation a mag safety interlock could be a huge advantage of just dropping the mag out and maybe kicking it away or something instead of firing rounds up into the unknown.

Silent Sam
March 15, 2011, 03:15 AM
Browning added the grip safety at the behest of the govt. If you really don't like it or a magazine disconnect on a Hi-Power, they both are relatively easy to get rid of.

AK103K
March 15, 2011, 10:15 AM
You can have troubles with the grip safety not deactivating with a high grip, or a weak grip. Ive had it happen in both cases.

Another issue with them is they dont always work (trigger trips without depressing the safety). Ive had a few over the years that did not work out of the box, the last being my Kimber Ultra Carry. Its important you check to see they do work if youre planning on relying on them.

Winkman822
March 15, 2011, 02:02 PM
Just to try it, I attempted to keep my Springfield TRP out of batter with a snap cap chambered last night and was able to push the slide back into battery without coming off of the grip safety. I use a high hand hold and my right thumb rests atop the thumb safety, the nifty little palm swell on the gun kept the grip safety depressed whilst I moved my thumb over to put the gun back in battery.

It can be done, I'm not going to say I'd want to squeeze the trigger with my thumb there though. I'd want my thumb back atop the safet lever lickety split and in a hurry.

G27RR
March 15, 2011, 04:14 PM
Has a grip safety ever prevented you from pulling the trigger when you wanted to?

Nope, never had a problem with one. I have them on eight 1911s and my XD45.

Ole Coot
March 16, 2011, 04:07 PM
I am not a fan of safeties of any type, that being said I have never had a problem with a 1911 in 50yrs of shooting one.

AK103K
March 16, 2011, 04:37 PM
I dont think most 1911 shooters consider the injured/wounded issue and having to shoot the gun with a less than optimal grip.

Next time youre out, give it a try, and I think you might be surprised.

Last summer I was using my Commander as a "control" against my Glock (ended up being the other way around) in a "limp wrist" experiment. Holding both guns with no grip, just the gun resting lightly in my hand, basically the trigger guard resting on my middle finger, and the backstrap on the web of my hand (my trigger finger was the only thing keeping the guns from flying out of my hand when they fired), I ended up with more problems with the 1911 than I did the Glock, which actually made it through 4 full 17 round mags without a stoppage.

The 1911 had a number of "fail to fires" due to the grip safety not being engaged. Now they really werent "stoppages" per se, and the gun did fire when my grip was readjusted, but the gun did not go off when it was supposed to and I was expecting it to.

Its really something something worth trying if you carry a 1911 so you understand whats going on and why and how to deal with it.

Loosedhorse
March 16, 2011, 05:23 PM
The only such problem with a grip safety I've encountered is with a S&W Model 40 revolver. It may be a fitting problem: either the grip safety is poorly fitted, or my hand and grip on the frame don't dependably depress the safety. I don't carry it.

For those of you experiencing grip safety problems with a 1911: did these all happend using grip safeties with a raised pad at the bottom? It's pretty hard not to disengage the grip safety with one of those, IMHO.

I would hesitate to disable any safety on a piece used for self-defense. Disabling a safety could later be argued to show recklessness.

JTQ
March 16, 2011, 08:50 PM
I've never had a problem engaging the grip safety on my 1911, and I have a standard grip safety with no pad or ridge on it.

AK103K wrote,
I ended up with more problems with the 1911 than I did the Glock, which actually made it through 4 full 17 round mags without a stoppage.

Fellow THR Forum member Sturmgewehre also ran a few limp wrist tests and got a different result. Most have probably seen these videos, but in case you haven't.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsewsolPyBU&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jh9JhCyFFxA&feature=related

Carbonator
March 16, 2011, 09:02 PM
At the local Cabela's I tried dry firing a Smith & Wesson revolver w/ back strap grip safety and in trying not-so-perfect various grip holds, the trigger locked up multiple times preventing me from pulling the trigger. Kinda defeats one of the main benefits of a revolver. I would never own one.

I am not a big fan of XD's and I do prefer Glocks for various reasons, but the main reason is the grip safety. I think the XD grip safety was born out of Springfield's marketing department - more gadgetry and flash at the expense of functionality. I guess they try to add things to differentiate themselves from Glocks. I would never own an XD because of the back strap.

One requirement for all of my hand guns is that I must be able to shoot well one handed with a not-so-good grip, with either hand. If I ever have to shoot someone I don't think I will be in a perfect shooting range stance, both hands on the gun, and it likely won't be a piece of paper attacking me. Good chance I'll have already been injured by the time I draw. I won't be thinking of switchable safeties or proper grip at that split second. Maybe I'll be fixated on that kitchen knife that is coming at me.

I don't want anything that complicates my self defense guns. I know some people like guns with multiple trigger actions, switchable safeties, decockers, exposed hammers, grip safeties, ambidextrious mag releases, unchambered carry etc... To me they are for the most part potential weak links that complicate a self defense situation.

Most of all, if the moment comes when I have to god forbid shoot someone, I don't want that split second decision and mental process to be cluttered because I am thinking about my safeties or if my grip is sufficient to disengage the grip safety or if I really do have a round in the chamber. I want to be thinking 100% about whether or not I need to shoot another human being. I have heard quite a few cases where the decision to shoot was so fine that it could have blown either way given a slight influence in either direction - "I almost shot that guy but everything turned out ok" etc...

KISS Keep It Simple Stupid and all that...

DeepSouth
March 16, 2011, 09:34 PM
I have XD's and 1911's and have never had a problem, nor do I know of any person who has ever had a problem. Other than on the net of course. :scrutiny::scrutiny:

AK103K
March 16, 2011, 09:35 PM
Fellow THR Forum member Sturmgewehre also ran a few limp wrist tests and got a different result.
His videos and a discussion here, or TFL was the reason I was trying it out.

Holding the 1911 sideways as he did in his videos, firmly depresses the grip safety. If you hold the gun in a more realistic manner, but with a weak grip, I think youre going to find you're more apt to have some problems.

I didnt have near as much trouble as he did with the Glock. I only had failures when holding it sideways, and even then, I only had a 1 in 3 or 4 and sometimes more, failure rate. Holding it more realistically, it fired and cycled every time. Ejection wasnt as brisk, but the gun still worked.

I was a little surprised with the Commander's performance though, but the more I thought about it, the more it made/makes sense. The lighter your grip, the more it puts pressure at the top of the grip safety, which tends to bring it out at the bottom, disengaging it.

Youre best bet with any of them, if youre planning on trusting your life with them, is to try things out for yourself and see how things go. If you can get them to fail in practice, you'll at least know ahead of time what to expect, and be able to correct some things ahead of time, or deal with things if things go wrong.

DeepSouth
March 16, 2011, 09:47 PM
Browning added the grip safety at the behest of the govt. If you really don't like it or a magazine disconnect on a Hi-Power, they both are relatively easy to get rid of.

Actually, you have your safeties mixed up. His original design had a grip safety but no thumb safety. He added the thumb safety for them.


http://www.coltautos.com/images/1910_5.jpg

9mmepiphany
March 16, 2011, 11:35 PM
Actually, you have your safeties mixed up. His original design had a grip safety but no thumb safety. He added the thumb safety for them.


http://www.coltautos.com/images/1910_5.jpg
This is correct, the original 1911 was designed without the thumb safety and to be carried with an empty chamber. It was designed for mounted soldiers and the thumb safety was requested to lessen the possibility of shooting their horses when reholstering

Ankeny
March 17, 2011, 11:44 AM
I have XD's and 1911's and have never had a problem, nor do I know of any person who has ever had a problem. OTOH, I know several folks who have problems disengaging grip safeties on 1911 or 2011 style pistols, including myself. On my competition guns I deactivate the safety altogether. On my carry guns I "desensitize" the grip safety and use a safety with a raised hump.

The problem seems to be most pronounced with a really high grip in conjunction with going to the races. :) For some folks, they simply have a hand that leaves a little void along the back of the gun.

Drail
March 17, 2011, 04:31 PM
If you work on 1911s long enough you will occasionally come across pistols that have what we used to call "chicken choker" grip safeties on them. Sometimes on a factory new gun and sometimes on an older gun where someone had been swapping grip safeties or mainspring housings or triggers around. It's a simple fix and there is no reason to put up with one that won't disengage easily every time without requiring you to alter your natural grip. On a lot of competition IPSC or steel guns the grip safety is commonly adjusted to release with a 1/16th" of movement or rendered completely inoperative because of the speed required to draw and hit sometimes leaves you with a less than perfect grip. All of my race guns have had the grip safety deactivated.

Cop Bob
March 17, 2011, 05:04 PM
"If you have your firearm muzzle in direct contact with the assailant there is a possibility the gun could get pushed out of battery." If this is of concern, I would submit a double action revolver is a much better solution than holding a slide with your shooting hand thumb, or any thumb for that matter. Wouldn't be a decision point for me against using a semi w/ a grip safety.
The revolver has the same problem if the assailant grabs the weapon where it can lock up the cylinder....

The auto on the other hand, pull back and pull the trigger.unless the hammer follows the slide home when it comes back into battery... either that or don't push it so hard into his gut if think you will have to pull the trigger... the belly button doesn't HAVE to touch the back bone...

Seriously, that close in, tuck the weapon, at the ready(pointed at the object of your attention)), up against your side. If they make a move , turn weapon side away and push at them with the off/weak hand... put some distance between you..

EddieNFL
March 17, 2011, 09:16 PM
Try as I may, I cannot grab a 1911 in such a way that the grip safety does not disengage. I would have to consciously hold it between my thumb and fingers...but then I wouldn't reach the trigger so moot point. Guess I was born with 1911 hands.

Hoth206
March 18, 2011, 06:47 PM
I've never had a problem with the grip safety on either XD's or 1911's. I think part of it has to do with the fact that I have pretty meaty hands with short fingers. I can't reach the trigger without depressing the grip safety. I can see if you have more slender/bony hands that there could be some issues.

Personally, I like the grip safety for 2 reasons.
1. If you're re-holserting an XD you can pull your thumb off of the grip and push the back of the slide into the holster. This adds another level of protection against "glock leg" should something enter the trigger guard.

2. Shooters who may drop a gun...seems like the grip safety would be slightly less likely if you're fumbling with a dropped gun (which is a natural reaction). The grip safety can keep a stray finger in the trigger guard from discharging the gun.

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