Hydrographic printing process


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DammitBoy
March 14, 2011, 04:13 PM
On firearms - has anybody done this? How is it done? What are the drawbacks or benefits? It looks very interesting. Here are some examples I've seen elsewhere.

http://www.dipndesign.com/images/albums/NewAlbum_e751e/IMG_1914_edited.jpg

http://dipnstuff.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/DSCF5235.jpg

http://ee.ar15.com/uploadImages/20100821/220063/Uploaded_634179817459243750_File.JPG

edit: Sorry for the huge pics

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Giterboosted
March 14, 2011, 04:26 PM
I've seen the process used before on car arts, fairly durable when done correctly

DammitBoy
March 14, 2011, 04:47 PM
On car parts? What type of parts?

kingpin008
March 14, 2011, 04:49 PM
Would you mind re-sizing those pics? They're HUGE.

DammitBoy
March 14, 2011, 04:56 PM
They're just links to pics, not mine and they do show close-up details of the process.

Sorry.

clancy12
March 14, 2011, 04:57 PM
I've seen the process used before on car arts, fairly durable when done correctly
On car parts? What type of parts?
Arts, not parts. As in the Walt Disney looking cars with the graphics saying shop at such and such a store, etcetera.

kingpin008
March 14, 2011, 04:59 PM
Dammit - They're definitely not links to pics - the pics are showing up in your post. It's not personally a big deal, but it does make it harder to read replies to the thread.

Clancy - the stuff you see on cars involves "wrapping" the car in very thin film that has a graphic printed on it. The process Dammit is asking about is entirely different. It's done by floating a layer of some kind of ink or film on a water bath, and then submerging the gun in the bath. In the process, the ink is deposited on the firearm. What the specifics of the process and ink/film are, I have no idea, but I know that's how I've seen it done.

DammitBoy
March 14, 2011, 05:01 PM
They're definitely not links to pics - the pics are showing up in your post.

If you don't understand how one 'links' a picture to a site from another site, that is not a photo on your own harddrive. I can't help you understand it.

kingpin008
March 14, 2011, 05:08 PM
Dammit - I understand it just fine. The problem is that they're not simply links - if they were, we could click them and view them on the actual site where they reside, and their size wouldn't be a problem. Instead, they're viewable in your post, and they're throwing off the formatting. That's not technically a "link" as you use the word.

All in all, I really don't care - I was simply attempting to alert you to a potential issue with your post that might make it hard for some people to view the thread. I also took a second to attempt to answer your question. Perhaps next time I just won't bother.

Sam1911
March 14, 2011, 05:16 PM
edit: Sorry for the huge pics

NOW they are links. Not "linked" images. Are we all cool?

JohnBT
March 14, 2011, 05:22 PM
I believe the sheet dissolves leaving the ink/pattern floating on the surface and ready for the item to be dipped. Here...

www.camodipkit.com

With a video of how to use their DIY kit.

DammitBoy
March 14, 2011, 07:46 PM
Dammit - I understand it just fine. The problem is that they're not simply links - if they were, we could click them and view them on the actual site where they reside, and their size wouldn't be a problem. Instead, they're viewable in your post, and they're throwing off the formatting. That's not technically a "link" as you use the word.

All in all, I really don't care - I was simply attempting to alert you to a potential issue with your post that might make it hard for some people to view the thread. I also took a second to attempt to answer your question. Perhaps next time I just won't bother.

Let's just call it a misunderstanding because you asked me to resize pictures I had no control over as opposed to changing the pictures displayed to links.

Thanks Sam.

DammitBoy
March 14, 2011, 07:47 PM
(back on topic)

Does anybody have a firearm that has had this process applied? Is it durable and would you use it again? Any problems with the application?

Kingofthehill
March 14, 2011, 08:05 PM
I have personally done this process before when i was doing rapid prototyping with plastics.

Its an amazing way of applying graphics. At the time i never really thought about doing it to my firearms but i did help a co-worker do a carbon fiber pattern to his synthetic stock on his shotgun. I also did the dash components on my car with wood grain.

Its quite durable really and i believe a lot of the Walther P22's are done with the same technique.

http://i51.tinypic.com/sbq3wl.jpg

and the Sig Mosquitos

http://i51.tinypic.com/96vogl.jpg

AK103K
March 14, 2011, 08:09 PM
The "skull" pattern is pretty cool. Is that the one your going for? :)


Ive seen a couple done like that, but they were new when I saw them.

straybullet
March 14, 2011, 08:14 PM
Interesting process, thanks for bringing it up Dammit you got me in google now, lol.

Giterboosted
March 14, 2011, 10:54 PM
No i did In fact mean car PARTS, items such as valve covers and intakes, and I did not mean the vinyl wrapping either as kingpin said, I can give a bit of information on either if needed lol

armoredman
March 15, 2011, 12:07 AM
Love that SiG, digital desert is awesome...now to get the vz-58 done that way...

DammitBoy
March 15, 2011, 02:28 AM
The "skull" pattern is pretty cool. Is that the one your going for? :)



Yeah, that's the one that caught my eye. :o

rocinante
March 15, 2011, 07:06 AM
Reading the FAQ it appears to be a bit of an art getting it right.

DammitBoy
March 15, 2011, 01:00 PM
Reading the FAQ it appears to be a bit of an art getting it right.

I don't think I'd attempt it myself, plenty of the sites I looked at charge about $150 or less to do a complete AR system - but you have to send it to them broken down.

Kingofthehill
March 15, 2011, 01:15 PM
I don't think I'd attempt it myself, plenty of the sites I looked at charge about $150 or less to do a complete AR system - but you have to send it to them broken down.


not a chance, do it yourself! No real specialty equipment req and you won't have to pay an FFL x-fer fee if its a S/N poriton of the gun.

Practice is what its all about and the best thing is you can practice on all sorts of scrap. Its not EASY but its not HARD either. I may just buy a kit to get back into it. Just don't make the first project a part/firearm you are nervous about. Work up to it.

Tinkering is a blast! hehehehehe

DammitBoy
March 15, 2011, 01:23 PM
The kit is $100 + shipping. How many kits would I end up purchasing to practice? Probably at least two.

I'd rather have a business that I trust do it correctly, instead of me wasting time and money to do an amateur job.

kingpin008
March 15, 2011, 01:24 PM
Kingofthehill has a good point - depending on what your FFL charges for transfers, it might get expensive quick. May well be better off doing it yourself.

Kingofthehill
March 15, 2011, 03:28 PM
The kit is $100 + shipping. How many kits would I end up purchasing to practice? Probably at least two.

I'd rather have a business that I trust do it correctly, instead of me wasting time and money to do an amateur job.


For me i guess its like Reloading. I enjoy that aspect too and am always tinkering. Im having a hard time remembering how much i used back in the day during the learning process and looking at the "Kit" for 100 to see if i could get the learning curve out of the way again and enjoy some of the product in that first kit.

Its not going to be for everyone thats for sure. Just my .02c

I love having something different than what everone else has and this is pretty slick.

DammitBoy
March 15, 2011, 04:50 PM
There ya go, I'm not a reloader either. :D I ride a motorcycle, but not a harley, because I'd rather ride than tinker. I take my guns to a gunsmith if I want to upgrade them.

If your AR is completely broke down, and you don't send them the trigger group or any other internals, why would you need to send it through your FFL? Because of the unassembled lower?

I agree it looks like a cool process and I'll probably try it out on something before I try throwing it on a brand new, expensive to me AR. Maybe a pelican box?

AK103K
March 15, 2011, 04:56 PM
If your AR is completely broke down, and you don't send them the trigger group or any other internals, why would you need to send it through your FFL? Because of the unassembled lower?
You probably wouldnt have to to send it, but it will have to go to one, and come back through one.

DammitBoy
March 15, 2011, 04:59 PM
You probably wouldnt have to to send it, but it will have to go to one, and come back through one.

Well, the place I would be sending it to is an FFL, and they'd be sending it back to my FFL - so that's a one time $25 transfer. No biggie.

Thanks!

kingpin008
March 15, 2011, 06:04 PM
If your AR is completely broke down, and you don't send them the trigger group or any other internals, why would you need to send it through your FFL? Because of the unassembled lower?

Bingo. But yeah, if you're OK with the fees, go for it. :)

Kingofthehill
March 16, 2011, 07:56 AM
Bingo. But yeah, if you're OK with the fees, go for it.


Agreed... Here in TX i would have to pay for shipping there, and then return on the FFL for $20 but in places like California, it won't cost you any less than $75 i believe. I know the Local places in Socal when i was shooting there was always between $100-$175 just to import a firearm to the FFL plus shipping out.

It was never a good deal to buy online living in CA.... glad im in TX now :)

DammitBoy
March 16, 2011, 01:39 PM
So, if the process is just ink transfered by suspension in water - what makes the ink so durable?

AK103K
March 16, 2011, 01:45 PM
I was always under the impression it was a "film". The guns Ive seen it done on, always had a seam where the two sides came together.

45crittergitter
March 16, 2011, 09:20 PM
OK, the bonus question is who offers it in RealTree Xtra Brown? :scrutiny:

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