Case is "sticking" in chamber of 45 ACP


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clongest
March 17, 2011, 08:43 PM
It's a Remington 1911. I'm new to reloading.. only been doing it about a year. 45, 9mm, and 380 so far. This is the first time I noticed that sometimes the cartridge is "sticky" in the chamber, i.e., after the round is chambered if I try to pull back the slide it doesn't want to come easily. It comes back maybe 1/8 inch or so and stops. If I pull hard enough the slide will come back and all looks well. Doesn't seem to affect shooting any. I've experienced this with both Winchester and R-P cases. Hmm... maybe it's just dirty?
Any thoughts? Thanks.

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highlander 5
March 17, 2011, 08:55 PM
You may not have done a good job of taper crimping your cases. Easiest way to find out,take the barrel out of your pistol and use it as a gauge. If the round drops in freely your golden if not readjust your crimp die. And are you using a seprate crimp die?

TexasRifleman
March 17, 2011, 08:58 PM
And are you using a seprate crimp die?

That's the right question for sure. Trying to seat and crimp at the same time can cause this.

bayhawk2
March 17, 2011, 09:23 PM
clongest-Welcome from S/W Texas.The case brass @ the "mouth" should measure around .473 or a little less,when crimped properly.A good cleaning of the chamber (brush,solvent,and swaub.)Good luck.

Win1892
March 18, 2011, 12:19 AM
I have a Beretta 92 that is real particular about resized cases. My 45s, mostly 1911s, have never failed to extract. During lengthy shooting sessions, sometimes exceeding 800 rounds, I will have to do a field cleaning to keep them chambering.

Seat and crimp in 2 operations.

918v
March 18, 2011, 02:08 AM
Maybe his bullets are too big for his chamber throat and are sticking.

ArchAngelCD
March 18, 2011, 04:53 AM
It sounds like the above suggestions about your taper crimp sounds like the possible problem. I know there are many who feel bullet seating and crimping should be done in one step but I'm not one of them. If you're not using a separate crimp die you might consider it if this problem continues.

altitude_19
March 18, 2011, 10:23 AM
Crimp and seating in the same step is a non issue for good production guns. What kind of barrel are you using? Is it something that might have been made to tighter specifications than most chambers/barrels?
Either way, the notion that seating/crimping in one die will ALWAYS cause cartridges to "squat" or otherwise deform to the point of not chambering cleanly is nonsense. I do it all the time and my rounds drop with a nice clean "tink" in a tight-tolerance cartridge guage without fail.

SlamFire1
March 18, 2011, 10:40 AM
When I sent my Colt Combat Elite to Wilson Arms for fixing, they sent it back and with a reloading data sheet.

All the Wilson Arms loads were taper crimped to 0.469". Lacking originality and initiative, I simply copied what they did, and life has been good.

Good poets borrow, great poets steal. ;)

soloban
March 18, 2011, 11:57 AM
You might try the Lee Factory Crimp Die. I have one for 45, 9mm, and 38/357 and I never have an issue with chambering or sticking. My $0.02.

GaryL
March 18, 2011, 12:21 PM
You might also check the OAL (or COL, depending on the manual). The ogive of the bullet could be causing it to stick in the throat.

I agree with highlander in using the barrel for a test gage. You could also try marking the case to see where it is sticking. My other thought is are you sizing far enough down the case?

rcmodel
March 18, 2011, 02:17 PM
the "mouth" should measure around .473 or a little lessActually, the mouth should measure .469" to no more then .471" after taper crimping if you want your reloads to be like factory & GI 45 ACP loads.

As for your problem?
Color a couple of rounds (Case & bullet ogive) that stick with a black magic-marker and chamber them.
When the black rubs off is your problem.

rc

USSR
March 18, 2011, 02:49 PM
Color a couple of rounds (Case & bullet ogive) that stick with a black magic-marker and chamber them.
When the black rubs off is your problem.

Ah, yes, the magic marker is indeed the handloader's friend.

Don

918v
March 18, 2011, 02:56 PM
My crimp hovers around .473" with lead bullets. It feeds into my Springers without any issues. You should not use the GI ball approach for lead reloads as the bullets are bigger.

clongest
March 19, 2011, 01:25 PM
Ah yes... the magic marker came through for me. That is to say, I can see what the problem is.... but what do I do? The ogive is contacting the barrel before the case rim seats. My OAL is 1.232". Recommended is 1.230 to 1.235. I have to push the bullet down to 1.212 before I hear the "clink" and the cartridge no longer sticks. Hmmm... Bullets are Hrndy XTP 230 g. I'm pretty sure I will have feed problems if I go down to 1.112. So... Remember, the gun seems to shoot fine, even if the cartridge isn't all the way down. Or maybe it is down, but just has the ogive kind of pressed in? No.. I can see that the cartridge is not quite as far down as an empty casing that goes "clink".
Anyway, I don't see much in options here. More comments from you, oh learned ones, please. You're doing great so far. And I appreciate it very much. :)

918v
March 19, 2011, 01:27 PM
Well, there you go. You are using a TC profile bullet at an OAL designed for RN bullets. You should seat them deeper, as you did, and reduce the powder charge appropriately.

clongest
March 19, 2011, 01:42 PM
Hmmm.. the OAL was given to me specifically for the bullet, though I don't remember now who gave it to me. I've been using 4.9gr of 700x. How much should I reduce it if I reduce the OAL from 1.232 to 1.212?

Thanks again for the help.

rcmodel
March 19, 2011, 02:28 PM
Hodgdon lists 4.9 grains 700x as max with a 230 Hornady FMJ-FP seated 1.200".
Pressure is shown as 16,600 CUP, or well under SAAMI max for the .45 ACP standard or +P loads.

So seat them 1.200" and see if they will feed.

rc

918v
March 19, 2011, 02:39 PM
The FMJ FP is shorter than the XTP. I would work-up the load from 4-4.5 grains to start.

USSR
March 19, 2011, 03:20 PM
Hmmm.. the OAL was given to me specifically for the bullet, though I don't remember now who gave it to me.

Every gun is different, so it is no big surprise that an OAL for someone else, doesn't work for you. I have to seat the Lee .45-230 TC bullets .050" deeper than most people in my Colt Gold Cup. I drop back 0.2 grains when doing so.

Don

clongest
March 19, 2011, 04:46 PM
What is the length of the the FMJ FP that you mention?

ArchAngelCD
March 20, 2011, 01:32 AM
Hmmm.. the OAL was given to me specifically for the bullet, though I don't remember now who gave it to me. I've been using 4.9gr of 700x. How much should I reduce it if I reduce the OAL from 1.232 to 1.212?
2/100 of an inch will not be of consequence with your charge weight considering. If you were changing the OAL by 2/10" it would be a totally different story but 2/100", not a huge difference. Hodgdon is using a OAL of 1.200" with that bullet and a Max charge of 4.9gr 700X. Your round has a longer OAL so you are fine. Check the Hodgdon Load Data Site (http://data.hodgdon.com/cartridge_load.asp) for yourself which is always better than taking someones word.

rskent
March 20, 2011, 07:03 AM
If you just noticed this, two questions. Does your Remington catch or drag at all without a round chambered? And does is catch at all with a factory hardball?
Just thinking
Steve

clongest
March 20, 2011, 10:01 AM
rskent-
No doesn't drag normally.

ArchangelCD-
Hodgdon gives data for the FMH FP but not for the XTP. 918v said the XTP is a longer round that's why I asked for the length of the FMH FP. (I can't find it anywhere.)

So I guess I'll try 1.210 and see how it feeds. I was having trouble with feeding at these shorter lengths, but I just discovered that one of my mags seems to misfeed the 3rd round down, so maybe OAL was not my problem.

Thanks again for all the info guys. You are a wealth of information.

Chuck-

ArchAngelCD
March 21, 2011, 06:33 AM
Don't obsess over the OAL of your ammo. You need to build it so that it reliably feeds in your pistol every time. That's why you're supposed to start at the Min charge weight and work your way up. The additional pressure generated by seating the bullet won't be dangerous if your using the Min charge weight. After you get the OAL correct you can work up the powder weight. When you achieve the velocity you're looking for you have your load set. (as long as it's also accurate that is lol)

IMO if you're still worried start another thread and ask the members who own a Hornady Manual to post the OAL they recommend with their XTP bullet. Sorry I don't have a Hornady manual or I would tell you right here.

rfwobbly
March 21, 2011, 02:02 PM
Hmmm.. the OAL was given to me specifically for the bullet,

Mr Clongest -
Welcome to the fun of reloading.

Per your statement above, the OAL is completely determined by how your bullet fits into your barrel. The only person that can "give you an OAL" that's worth a toot is someone with the exact same pistol and exact same bullet, and even then you can get variations. Sometimes (for instance) a bullet's shape allows it to fit all Colt and Kimber chambers so a 'folk lore' builds up around a certain OAL that 80% of the shooters are using, but that's still no guarantee that it will work in your gun at all. The mantra then becomes: "Trust but Verify."

Lead is going to be problematic for a new reloader. Lead bullets are simply larger diameter and so it takes more work on your part to work out all the details. It's not hard once you've done it twice, but the first time can be a headache. IMHO for your first reloads in any gun, plated or jacketed bullets are the way to go. THEN with that positive experience under your belt, move on to lead.

The first place to start with any new reload is to get the physical shape of the loaded cartridge right. You can best do this by making up 4 or 5 test cartridges with no powder and no primer. In the end, these should drop right into your naked barrel's chamber (ie removed from the gun)with a Clink! by using only their own weight. If it won't drop all the way in and then all the way back out, you have more work to do.

Hope this helps! ;)

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