Backpacking Yellowstone with a gun: open or concealed carry?


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RyeDaddy
March 23, 2011, 11:57 AM
Anyone been to Yellowstone with a gun?
I have a Yellowstone trip in June for the family. We're going go be there for two weeks doing backcountry camping, and Im going to bring a handgun.

I'm familiar with the new law that allows me to carry in the park, I have a CHL so i can carry concealed or open. My question is whether anyone has been to Yellowstone, and did you carry open, or see anyone open carrying while you were there?

I would rather open carry for comfort's sake, but Yellowstone attracts all kinds and I'll carry concealed if need be to avoid being stared at or scaring Californians.

What's the consensus?

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McKnife
March 23, 2011, 12:02 PM
I am not certain, but I believe the law specifies only concealed handguns.

As cool as it would be, open carry would probably bring out a SWAT team.

Omaha-BeenGlockin
March 23, 2011, 12:15 PM
Have a feeling that 99.98% of Yellowstone visitors never get farther than 50ft from the car.

NavyLCDR
March 23, 2011, 12:33 PM
I am not certain, but I believe the law specifies only concealed handguns.

As cool as it would be, open carry would probably bring out a SWAT team.

Neither of those statements is true. The National Park Law is now that there is no National Park Law. The same state laws outside the gates of the National Park now apply inside the National Park with no difference. Open carry without any permit at all is legal in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, so open carry without any permit at all is legal in Yellowstone National Park (except inside buildings regularly staffed by National Park employees because they are Federal facilities and will be posted with signs.)

Open carry draws very little attention in Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. Wyoming just passed an almost Constitutional carry law.

460Kodiak
March 23, 2011, 01:16 PM
I was there about two years ago. I was there in May for the second week they had opened up the roads, and the bears were just coming out of hibernation. Be warned that it is likely in June that there will be a lot of people out on the trails, so you will be more likely to come across a higher proportion of people who are scared of guns, and will thus be uncomfortable with you open carrying. The nice part is that if you get a ways out, you are more likely to meet actual back packing individuals who probably carry a gun themselves. There will also be a lot of foreign people there as well, but they will only be armed with cammeras. Based on my experience of having a relatively, though not bad, close encounter with a griz, I would carry a gun as well. They are numerous in Yellowstone. However, do to the massive turist industry there, they are also quite used to being around people. None the less, KEEP YOUR CHILDREN CLOSE, since they may startle a bear and that could be really dangerous.

What caliber and make of gun are you bringing? Is it easily concealable? If it is, I'd definately recomend doing so to avoid scaring the city people. Of course, if the gun is easily concealable, is it really enough for a griz?

lloveless
March 23, 2011, 01:19 PM
What NavyLt said. On the other hand there are probably a bunch of liberal types there during tourist season, that would be happy to agitate. I personally conceal carry everwhere in public(except where posted), and open in the field.
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RyeDaddy
March 23, 2011, 01:30 PM
Thanks for the replies so far, still interested in hearing other opinions. I've never been there, but I know that in Wyoming like Texas people don't worry about guns. Yellowstone is not full of Texans and the like so it's worth asking.

As to my gun I've got a few options. I'd like to carry my Ruger Blackhawk, which is obviously an open carry only proposition. Otherwise it'd be a Colt Delta Elite 10mm, or my Glock 23, either of which can be carried concealed but I'd still prefer open as I'll be hauling an Eberlestock bag. The 40 cal Glock may not be the best choice for bear defense, we'll be carrying bear spray first, but when push comes to shove I think 13 rounds of 200 grain FMJ beats a sharp stick for sure.

rozziboy18
March 23, 2011, 02:06 PM
open carry.

one reason. BEARS!!!!

22-rimfire
March 23, 2011, 02:22 PM
Assuming what NavyLt is correct and I believe it is, I would open carry discreetly away from the roads and tuck that black hawk in my pack when close to "civilization" and the tourist masses.

The reason as stated... BEARS, not that you want to shoot one unless you have to protect yourself or your family. Be sure to follow the bear prevention guidelines for storing food at your camp site.

I guess the only loose end is to check that open carry is legal for non-residents and I have no idea as I would have my permit which would make me legal whether open carrying or concealed carry in WY.

NavyLCDR
March 23, 2011, 02:39 PM
I guess the only loose end is to check that open carry is legal for non-residents and I have no idea as I would have my permit which would make me legal whether open carrying or concealed carry in WY.

There is no law prohibiting open carry in Idaho, Wyoming or Montana. Residency is a non-issue since there is no law to violate.

Why all this concern over how other tourists might react? And if they are afraid of the gun, how does anyone expect that to change if the public does not see normal Americans carrying guns in normal American life? And so what if they are scared?!? What are they going to do, call Ranger Smith? What is the Ranger going to do.... sorry if the other person's completely legal activity scares you.

I open carry every day in one of the most liberal, hippie infested part of the US, western Washington, including Seattle. 99% of the people don't even notice or have no reaction if they do.

Rick Roll
March 23, 2011, 02:51 PM
I completely agree with NavyLT. I only open carry on the trails around here (Alabama). People never seem to mind, although I also am not stopping them on the trail to ask their opinions :neener:.

When it come to your personal safety, especially in the back-country, I would lean towards whatever mode of carry allows you quick, safe and effective access to your firearm. OC seems to be more amenable when hiking simply due to the presence of your other gear.

Magoo
March 23, 2011, 04:07 PM
I've spent a good bit of time in Ystone and am planning another trip this summer. In all that time, my scariest critter encounter was with a cow moose and her calf. I came around a bend in a brushy trail and found myself within ten feet of a wobbly legged calf with mommy on the other side. She was not happy. I'm 6'5" and her shoulders were even with the top of my head :eek:. I slowly backed up as she position herself between me and her baby. Plenty of bear encounters, but nothing dangerous.

My point? If you need the gun, you may well need it in a hurry. Surprising critters is not a good way to encounter them ("bear bells" are popular, but I hate them). I'd OC and consider a harness that keeps the gun very quick and easy to draw- maybe rig a chest harness off the pack straps. I don't have an appropriate bear caliber pistol, but I'll have 13 rounds of .40 cal in the front of my fishing pack this year.

I've never carried bear spray and I'm sure I'd soil myself if I had to stand my ground against a charging bruin until it was within range. I think a good noisemaker will go a long way as a deterrent, if not just piece of mind.

Now to spend the rest of the day dreaming of the Lamar Valley....:)

22-rimfire
March 23, 2011, 04:18 PM
Why all this concern over how other tourists might react? And if they are afraid of the gun, how does anyone expect that to change if the public does not see normal Americans carrying guns in normal American life? And so what if they are scared?!? What are they going to do, call Ranger Smith? What is the Ranger going to do.... sorry if the other person's completely legal activity scares you.

I think NavyLt that we will just have to disagree on the carry issue. I don't believe in making anyone uncomfortable unless I am intentionally trying to do so. We will both do as we see fit. We have had these discussions before in other threads. In the woods I do one thing and usually in a urban area or populated area, I do another.

Vern Humphrey
March 23, 2011, 04:20 PM
Open carry.

1. It's more accessable (that's why cops carry openly.)
2. It's more convenient if you're carrying a pack.
3. You can carry a more appropriate gun (say a Ruger Blackhawk instead of a S&W 642.)
4. To educate the liberals.
5. To proudly exercise your constitutional rights.

Standing Wolf
March 23, 2011, 04:22 PM
Why all this concern over how other tourists might react? And if they are afraid of the gun, how does anyone expect that to change if the public does not see normal Americans carrying guns in normal American life? And so what if they are scared?!?

Amen! Meeting people who've never seen law-abiding American citizens openly keeping and bearing arms is an opportunity to educate people. We'd be a far happer, safer, saner, and more polite nation if millions of us openly exercised our right to keep and bear arms on a daily basis.

armoredman
March 23, 2011, 05:41 PM
Carbine in a decent caliber. But that would probably cause even ranger Rick to want to "have a word".
If I were to go backpacking, I would take my CZ 527M carbine with my CZ Phantom 9mm sidearm. Why? Both very light and handy tools, and some wildlife is a bit bigger than my handgun bullets are designed for.

jmr40
March 23, 2011, 06:12 PM
I'd prefer concealed. I haven't been to Yellwstone since the law changed, but have hiked in the Smokey Mt. National Park. Just be aware that while carry in the general park is allowed, (with a proper permit) it is not allowed in any park building where federal workers are present.

I'm not sure what Wyoming's carry laws say. A permit may not be needed there. Also remember small parts of the park are in Montana and Idaho. Make sure of the carrry laws in those states as well

hirundo82
March 23, 2011, 06:17 PM
I'm not sure what Wyoming's carry laws say. A permit may not be needed there. Also remember small parts of the park are in Montana and Idaho. Make sure of the carrry laws in those states as well

Of the three states, Wyoming has the most restrictive carry laws. All 3 allow open carry without a permit, but Wyoming is the only one that requires a permit for concealed carry outside of town limits (although soon residents can CC anywhere in the state w/o a permit).

verge
March 23, 2011, 06:41 PM
I was there about two years ago. I was there in May for the second week they had opened up the roads, and the bears were just coming out of hibernation. Be warned that it is likely in June that there will be a lot of people out on the trails, so you will be more likely to come across a higher proportion of people who are scared of guns, and will thus be uncomfortable with you open carrying. The nice part is that if you get a ways out, you are more likely to meet actual back packing individuals who probably carry a gun themselves. There will also be a lot of foreign people there as well, but they will only be armed with cammeras. Based on my experience of having a relatively, though not bad, close encounter with a griz, I would carry a gun as well. They are numerous in Yellowstone. However, do to the massive turist industry there, they are also quite used to being around people. None the less, KEEP YOUR CHILDREN CLOSE, since they may startle a bear and that could be really dangerous.

What caliber and make of gun are you bringing? Is it easily concealable? If it is, I'd definately recomend doing so to avoid scaring the city people. Of course, if the gun is easily concealable, is it really enough for a griz?
June two years ago we were snowed in in a blizzard in Yellowstone. It took us 8 hours of driving in 6 inches of snow to get from the middle of the park to the hotel at the west entrance. There were other people there but it was by no means crowded.

Mt Shooter
March 23, 2011, 06:49 PM
Guess Ill ring in here, I conceal carry. there are a lot of people there and alot of them from a foreign country. Alot of them are Asian and dont speak English, concealed would eliminate alot of problems/questions. Good luck,watch for bear and remeber those animals are not tame.

Hunt480
March 23, 2011, 07:27 PM
to avoid being stared at or scaring Californians
LOL...I would open carry for this alone.

HorseSoldier
March 23, 2011, 07:41 PM
Get a Safepacker from Wilderness Tactical -- highly accessible if you need it, and discrete enough that all the tourists from non-firearms friendly places won't be calling the Park Rangers on you. (You may be completely in compliance with the law while open carrying, but it's been my experience in very gun friendly Alaska that if people call the police because they see someone with a gun, officers are going to be sent out to contact that person even if only to determine they're in compliance with the law -- personally, that's more headache than I'd want to deal with on a vacation, and I can get to my bear gun in a safepacker almost as fast as I can draw it from a retention holster.)

hermannr
March 23, 2011, 07:56 PM
Yellowstone in June? I would be much more worried about the elk flies that the bears.

Don't ruin your hike with the stupid bells, just be aware and conscious of what is around you. You will be fine. Met many bears (black and Griz) in the woods (and in my yard here at our cabin) and never had a problem. I didn't do anything stupid, and they did everything they could to get out of my way. And I did not press the matter and push them either.

Whatever you do, DO NOT run away from any bear! Back away slowly, always facing the bear. They do not see well, and anything running away they think is fair game. If you do anything, throw your arms in the air and make yourself look as big as possible.

Bear spray works ok I guess, never used it myself. BTW: That 10mm will only stop a Griz if you shoot it in the mouth and up into the brain.

One really big word of warning...DO NOT SHOOT at a Griz unless you have to shoot it in the mouth....The Griz is protected, the fine is very substantial (and they will take your weapon). If you are being maulled, it would probably be a good defence, but I would not count on being maulled keeping them from taking your weapon and changing you.

NavyLCDR
March 23, 2011, 08:35 PM
In light of the rising frequency of human/grizzly bear encounters, the Montana Department of Fish and Game is advising hikers, backpackers, hunters, and fishermen to take extra precautions and keep alert for bears.

We advise outdoorsmen to wear noisy little bells on their clothing so that the bears are not startled unexpectedly by a human's presence. We also advise outdoorsmen to carry pepper spray with them in case of an encounter with a bear.

It is also a good idea to watch for fresh signs of bear activity. Outdoorsmen should recognize the difference between black bear poop and grizzly bear poop. Black bear poop is smaller and contains lots of berries and squirrel fur. Grizzly bear poop smells like pepper and has little bells in it.

hiker44
March 23, 2011, 10:24 PM
If you have a concealed carry permit for that part of the world, I would recommend carrying concealed. In any national park, you will meet people who will give you grief for carrying a gun, regardless of the reason or logic, so it is best to have the gun in a waist pack or a tuckable IWB holster. I carry in a 5.11 Tactical undershirt and it is comfortable, accessible and totally undetectable.

Balrog
March 24, 2011, 12:50 AM
It is also a good idea to watch for fresh signs of bear activity. Outdoorsmen should recognize the difference between black bear poop and grizzly bear poop. Black bear poop is smaller and contains lots of berries and squirrel fur. Grizzly bear poop smells like pepper and has little bells in it.

That always makes me laugh.

44Brent
March 24, 2011, 02:24 AM
I never cease to be astonished to CCers who imagine the sky will fall if they OC.

I OCed at Mt. Ranier in Washington State last summer in a heavily populated trail areas with a .44 magnum. I didn't get a second look from anyone.

The only people that freak out over OC are CCers with over-active imaginations.

Manco
March 24, 2011, 11:51 AM
Guess Ill ring in here, I conceal carry. there are a lot of people there and alot of them from a foreign country. Alot of them are Asian and dont speak English, concealed would eliminate alot of problems/questions.

Well, they came to see America, didn't they? (I don't mean that in a rude or crass way) What says "America" to foreigners better than the wilderness and guns? Granted, I wouldn't expect to see a cattle drive through Yellowstone any more than I would a samurai on horseback swinging his sword in modern-day Japan, but guns are still a happening thing in America, and just about everybody in the world knows that, I think.

Vern Humphrey
March 24, 2011, 12:01 PM
Guess Ill ring in here, I conceal carry. there are a lot of people there and alot of them from a foreign country. Alot of them are Asian and dont speak English, concealed would eliminate alot of problems/questions. Good luck,watch for bear and remeber those animals are not tame.
Would we also exterminate the bears, so foreign visitors don't see them and get upset?

Don't laugh -- I live just south of the Blanchard Springs recreational area in the Ozark National Forest, and the Forest Service distributes questionnaires with a space for writing in comments and suggestions. From time to time they publish some of the comments.

One read, "We saw a lot of wild animals. Can't something be done about this?"

RyeDaddy
March 24, 2011, 01:09 PM
One read, "We saw a lot of wild animals. Can't something be done about this?"

Now THAT was worth starting this thread for!

My father in law is going, and he's going to carry his G23 concealed, so I think I'll stow the Ruger in my pack and open carry it in the backcountry.

Mainsail
March 24, 2011, 02:01 PM
I take it that many of you don’t do much international travel. When you visit another country, you respect their customs and culture, you don’t try to impose yours on them. This is where the term ‘ugly American’ comes from.

If someone comes to the US and is offended or frightened by the mere presence of firearms, that’s their problem not mine.

…concealed would eliminate alot of problems/questions.
Are you implying that open carry will lead to problems and/or questions? What sort of problems? Questions from who? Was this an off the cuff remark or do you have an intelligent argument to support it? I open carry a G20SF when I hike and have never had a problem or been asked a question.

Vern Humphrey
March 24, 2011, 02:49 PM
Now THAT was worth starting this thread for!
Second place comment was, "There's so much climbing on these trails. Couldn't they all run down hill?":p

460Kodiak
March 24, 2011, 02:56 PM
Wow, this thread has turned into a debate of sorts. I'm out of it. Really all you need is pepper spray. Not for a bear or moose. It's to spray your buddy and then push him over and run away. It's like leaving a seasoned steak out as a distraction. LOL

Oh, and enjoy Ystone RyeDaddy. It's a really beautiful place. Wyoming is great, one of my favorite places.

hermannr
March 24, 2011, 03:15 PM
It is not so much the foreigners that you will bother, it is the people from NYC and Chicago.

Many years ago we privately hosted a boy from Germany so he could go to a year highschool here and improve his English. (He was from Berlin)

We could not take him shooting enough. He wanted to shoot and have his picture taken with every firearm we owned and most of the firearms my friends owned.

It is like 16 year olds drinking beer, Germans think nothing of it. as to the firearms, all of the ones I know would rather have looser laws, not more control...They like to shoot there, and take pride in their weapons.

Eyesac
March 24, 2011, 05:39 PM
I've open carried plenty w/ a pack (and rather comfortably), but I can't figure out how anyone would CC with a pack on. An IWB and a pack w/ a waist strap doesn't work, so just how would you CCW and backpack?

twofifty
March 24, 2011, 10:23 PM
A 2# handgun plus ammo and holster adds up to a lot of weight on a true backpack trip - not too bad for a dayhike though.

I use a blackpowder 22LR-propelled bear flash banger to ward off bears that get too curious. This is a pengun: very light and compact. Thank god it is effective, as reload time is forever. I've fired it twice at 50 then 80 or so feet to chase off a peaceful grizzly. With a few shots practice, those penguns will place a banger in the exact right spot.

The few bear incidents that occur in true wilderness backpacking settings like National Park and Nat. Forest backcountry happen because the hiker startles a male while it is feeding on a carcass, or stumbles onto a sow with cub(s). Some happen because of a dirty or poorly sited campsite kitchen, or poor food storage. Some just happen...and your time is up.

Anyhow, what Rangers and COs whose jobs involve managing bears in parks have told me, and what I've read in a couple bear behaviour books back up my personal positive experiences of 10 or so close-ish bear encounters (incl. a huge Black eating on a sequoia log at 150 feet, and a Black sow with 2 cubs at 200 yds - the sow barked a warning & the cubs climbed a birch tree while we took a big azz detour). These occurred out East and out West. I know nothing about Alaska's bears.

The funniest non-encounter was in the Adirondacks High Peaks (NYS) while camping in an out-of-the-way streamside spot, a mile or so up the trail from the established lakeside backpacking sites. Soon after dark, the lakeside groups set out great big clamours of pot-banging and screaming as their sites were methodically raided by Blackies who knew where to find easy meals. I heard later that no-one was injured. Meanwhile, we had a quiet night's sleep, our food hanging high and well away from our site.

You can look up "List of fatal bear attacks in North America" on Wikipedia to get a sense of where and in what circumstances bears kill humans.

Edit: Yellowstone is such an incredible place for wildlife. We only day-hiked but saw elk herds, a moose cow and calf, several bison, all kinds of birds. No bears though. I hear wolves were reintroduced and that as a result elk populations are doing better as are the riparian zones and the trout. Years later, I still think of Yellowstone as an Eden for animals and humans.

empty's
March 24, 2011, 10:44 PM
who cares if you want to carry open then carry open quit worrying about what other people think it's legal in that state. it really dosen't make a difference at this point dose it!

menacingsquirrel
March 25, 2011, 08:53 AM
"Grizzly bear poop smells like pepper and has little bells in it."

Lol!

merlinfire
March 25, 2011, 12:01 PM
If you're backpacking I'd say OC is just fine. Most people won't give you a second look.

elkdomBC
March 25, 2011, 12:26 PM
Federal National Parks in Canada have "ZERO Tolerance" to ANY personal Fire Arm in the National Parks system,
We (British Columbia ,Canada) still have generous Hunting seasons for Grizzly Bear, both spring and fall open Grizz seasons, both for resident citizens and Guided non-resident hunters,,,

If a FEW tourists are eaten every year by Grizzly Bears ??,and SOME are EATEN every year!

apparently National Parks Canada management is OK with that !,

LWYM425
March 25, 2011, 12:32 PM
I went in July last year (it was a sunday through tuesday). I remember finding out that Wyoming doesn't give reciprocity to WA CPL's but national parks just started allowing people to carry. So I open carried.

Me: hiking boots, cargo shorts, long sleeved t-shirt, S&W 686+ .357mag in a cheap Uncle Mike's holster. I also went to fairly crowded tourist hot spots like Old Faithful and several look outs. Could have been arrested for fashion, but not for the gun. And no one freaked out or stared me down either, even got an approving nod and a complement here and there by other S&W fans.

Now that I think about it, I didn't see many, if any, other OC-ers... it was just recently allowed though, so maybe that's why.
I can't remember, but I think I unloaded it, or put it in the trunk while driving because my CPL was meaningless there and you can't (I think) carry a loaded weapon in your vehicle without one in WY.... or maybe that was a different state. Look that part up.

Don't think I have to say this, but don't unholster it in public or in view of others. That seems to be fairly accepted by OC-ers even if some one asks about it.

On a final note, avoid killing a bear if you can. I know thats why you're bringing it, thats why i brought mine. But discharging a weapon is still illegal, and I would imagine you'd get some additional fines... self defense or not. Just the way it is.

Larry E
March 25, 2011, 10:59 PM
Most of Yellowstone is in WY, and if open carry there is legal I'd open carry. This may sound a little chicken, but I'd pack a big can of bear spray and have bear bells on everyone. Most bears aren't going to attack unless you get between them and cubs or if they have cubs and think you're bothering them. As someone pointed out moose are very cranky animals. A cow with a calf or a bull who's in a bad mood will stomp you into the ground faster than fast. Buffalo are also fast and can be ornery, think a range bull that's fast and has big horns.

Take care when storing food too.

If you take all precautions and have to shoot an animal it's likely that the shooting will be viewed as self defense. If you are harassing animals (which is up to a warden or wardens to determine), don't store your food properly, or shoot a bear that's just going about his business and you think is too close you're likely to be in deep and hot water.

It never fails to amaze me that a lot of people think that the animals are tame or "know" you mean them no harm because they're in a national park, but would be scared spitless if your Labrador ran up to them with its tail wagging.

duns
March 25, 2011, 11:50 PM
As a foreigner in the USA, I think it's really cool to see someone open carrying! I think nearly all foreigners would NOT be scared but would assume that the person was OC'ing lawfully. If they are totally unaware of the US laws on concealed and open carry, I think they would assume the person must be a plain clothes police officer. I really don't find it very credible that people would be scared at the sight. None of the people who suggested OC might be problematical appeared to have any actual experience of third parties getting scared. I could be wrong but I'm skeptical that it would be a problem (but then I don't have any experience either).

A specific question, I'm a resident alien with a TX CHL -- would I be OK to OC in Yellowstone? Or is there any law that requires you to be a US citizen, or at least a resident alien living in one of the states the park is in?

IdahoLT1
March 26, 2011, 12:24 PM
If you drive into Idaho, open carry is legal everywhere with no permit, even for non residents. Conceal carry is legal without a permit outside of city limits, even for non residents. Idaho is one of the few States that reciprocates with all States concealed weapon licenses.

merlinfire
March 26, 2011, 01:08 PM
vIf you drive into Idaho, open carry is legal everywhere with no permit, even for non residents. Conceal carry is legal without a permit outside of city limits, even for non residents. Idaho is one of the few States that reciprocates with all States concealed weapon licenses.

Wow, is there any other state this free?

IdahoLT1
March 26, 2011, 09:28 PM
If you drive into Idaho, open carry is legal everywhere with no permit, even for non residents. Conceal carry is legal without a permit outside of city limits, even for non residents. Idaho is one of the few States that reciprocates with all States concealed weapon licenses.


Wow, is there any other state this free?

I might be mistaken as far as non residents concealed carrying outside city limits. They do offer non resident ccw's and all you have to do show a hunter ed certificate, military ID or any firearm safety course certificate.

sohcgt2
March 27, 2011, 08:06 PM
This is what the NPS has to say on the firearm issue.

A change in federal law effective February 22, allows people who can legally possess firearms under federal, state, and local laws, to possess those firearms in Yellowstone National Park.

The new federal law makes possession of firearms in national parks also subject to the firearms laws of the states where the parks are located.

Yellowstone spans portions of the states of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. All three states allow open carry of handguns and rifles on one’s person or in a vehicle. They all also allow concealed carry of firearms with a permit.

While the state boundary lines are posted along park roadways, they are not posted along trails or in the backcountry. Each state has somewhat different firearms regulations. Those possessing firearms are responsible for knowing which state they are in, and are subject to the laws of that state.

Visitors who may wish to bring firearms to the park are encouraged to do their research ahead of time to ensure that they are aware of and abide by the laws that apply. Additional information is available online at http://www.nps.gov/yell/parkmgmt/lawsandpolicies.htm.

Iron Sight
March 27, 2011, 08:29 PM
sohcgt2

Thank you for actually posting the law as it is printed.

NavyLCDR
March 27, 2011, 10:31 PM
sohcgt2

Thank you for actually posting the law as it is printed.

Never mind. There is very good info in the link sohcgt2 posted.

CZguy
March 27, 2011, 11:03 PM
]
Quote:
It is also a good idea to watch for fresh signs of bear activity. Outdoorsmen should recognize the difference between black bear poop and grizzly bear poop. Black bear poop is smaller and contains lots of berries and squirrel fur. Grizzly bear poop smells like pepper and has little bells in it.

Balrog


That always makes me laugh.

As funny as it sounds, I've done a great deal of hiking over the years and have always found it useful to be able to identify many different types of scat.

On refelection............go ahead and laugh, it is funny.

txhoghunter
March 28, 2011, 11:15 AM
I would say concealed, just because there more than likely will be people there that would be uncomfortable seeing a firearm on their vacation. It's not that they will be anti-gun, just that if carrying concealed gives you peace-of-mind and it keeps them from being uncomfortable, I see it as a win-win.

just my .02

phoglund
March 28, 2011, 12:03 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdahoLT1
If you drive into Idaho, open carry is legal everywhere with no permit, even for non residents. Conceal carry is legal without a permit outside of city limits, even for non residents. Idaho is one of the few States that reciprocates with all States concealed weapon licenses.

Quote:
Wow, is there any other state this free?

Montana is essentially the same less the reciprocity with all state's CCW licenses.

NavyLCDR
March 28, 2011, 01:07 PM
I would say concealed, just because there more than likely will be people there that would be uncomfortable seeing a firearm on their vacation. It's not that they will be anti-gun, just that if carrying concealed gives you peace-of-mind and it keeps them from being uncomfortable, I see it as a win-win.

It's too bad that the sight of an American exercising their right to self-protection causes some people to be uncomfortable.

We have zero chance of changing that if the only image the public sees of guns is the image pushed at them by the Brady Campaign, other anti-gun groups and the anti-gun media.

While the sight of an normal American doing normal activities who just happens to have enough concern for their own safety and the safety of their families to carry a gun may not win everyone over, it certainly will contribute to counter the negative images shown by the anti-gun groups. A concealed handgun does nothing to counter those negative images.

LWYM425
March 28, 2011, 01:47 PM
OP,
If you're still on the fence; just do it. Open carrying is not as bad as people say it is. I'm sure there are people out there that "had a bad experience" but I highly doubt that will happen to you at Yellowstone. Its the PERFECT place to give OC-ing a try and get comfortable doing it. You'll find that the only person that is really worried about the gun on your hip is you. Only thing you have to remember is to not bring it in buildings... no biggie.
Plus, some one mentioned earlier in the thread about foreigners seeing Americans with guns and how we shouldn't worry about conforming our cultural behavior to be "better accepted" by others... Totally agree. In fact, I am ashamed that I almost opted not to. Having done it has given me valuable practice OC-ing that I don't get in urban settings. Its a whole lot easier for me to OC on a trail in the woods then it is going to buy some chew at the gas station.

NavyLCDR
March 28, 2011, 01:51 PM
I'm sure there are people out there that "had a bad experience" but I highly doubt that will happen to you at Yellowstone.

Those of us that have had a "bad experience" understand the need to change the perception. :D

Magoo
March 28, 2011, 01:53 PM
It never fails to amaze me that a lot of people think that the animals are tame or "know" you mean them no harm because they're in a national park

My second season waiting tables out there- one afternoon there was a buffalo grazing just outside the dining room window. A lady at my table asked if it was okay for her kids to step outside and pet the buff, assuming it must be a tame one hanging out so close :what::eek::what:. I can't remember my exact response, but my tip might not have been so good on that table.

My roommate my first season out there was gored by a buff (long story, not his fault at all). They are FAST over short distances.

HorseSoldier
March 28, 2011, 02:43 PM
I've been to Yellowstone a couple times, last time I was there about three years ago, drove by a scene where tourists were trying to push up on several buffalo to get 10-15 foot distance kind of close up pictures. What I saw were four or five people with cameras, totally focused on a couple of bison in front of them and seemingly oblivious to the fact that they'd split this little herd and had several kind of distressed looking animals at their backs as well.

And a park ranger with an M14 or M1A skedaddling towards this disaster in the making at high speed to hopefully head off the stupid that was about to occur.

MisterMike
March 28, 2011, 02:56 PM
Without getting all dramatic about it, you need to remember that the average grizzly is faster than the quickest human being. If you feel the need to carry, the only viable choice is to have your pistol as readily available as you can.

Having said that, most unfortunate encounters with bears--as with humans--come as the result of making one or more bad decisions. You should first read and heed all the fine advice that's available as to how to avoid bears. If you do end up with one charging you, my personal opinion--based only on reading and not on having been in the situation--is that a big honkin' canister of bear spray is a more reliable means of stopping an attack. If you go to your gun first, you had better be accurate . . . very accurate . . . or you may find yourself being pooped out of the bear's gut a day or two later.

Vern Humphrey
March 28, 2011, 02:59 PM
If someone says, "Seeing that gun makes me uncomfortable," a good response would be, "If seeing me exercise a Constitutional right makes you uncomfortable, then seeing you vote makes me uncomfortable."

Iron Sight
March 28, 2011, 04:49 PM
Originally Posted by Iron Sight
sohcgt2

Thank you for actually posting the law as it is printed.

Navy Lt

"He did not post any laws. "

Welllllll..........Read the Link post no 47

Pretty Clear to me?

NavyLCDR
March 28, 2011, 05:00 PM
My bad. There are links to the law there.

TexasRifleman
March 28, 2011, 08:00 PM
As nearly always happens a simple legal question involving open carry descends into a debate between gun owners about whether it's good or bad, ignoring the discussion of whether it's legal or not.

This is part of the reason we have so much trouble making progress, we can't even agree to be on the same side a lot of the time.

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