Fowl hunting.


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Spcl
March 25, 2011, 01:37 AM
I never really hunted for foul before. I usually hunt deer and elk but i've decided to attempt to hunt for duck or pheasant. Problem is, is that I do not want to ruin too much meat. I am asking for help with what kind of hunting set up i should use for duck or pheasant. I was thinking more on the lines of either a .410, 20 Gauge, or a .22 LR. I was leaning more toward a .22lr because im very comfortable with the .22 and confident in my marksmanship with my 10/22. But i am interested to hear about your opinions on what to use. Please tell the length of barrel, choke, and bore.

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Grumulkin
March 25, 2011, 07:43 AM
For foul fowl like crows, I generally use a rifle my favorites being a 204 Ruger and a 270 Winchester. On occasion, I've also used a 12 gauge shotgun.

Before you use a rifle on migratory game birds, check your migratory game bird regulations and I think you'll find it isn't permitted. As for the shotgun to use, go with a 12 gauge. At the ranges at which you'll be shooting flying birds, there won't be much meat damage, you'll throw more shot at them improving your chances of getting them and the recoil won't be that much more than a 20 gauge. I think you'd be very frustrated with a .410 shotgun.

lizziedog1
March 25, 2011, 09:27 AM
you'll throw more shot at them improving your chances of getting them

Get an 8 or 10 gauge. You'll throw even more shot up and increase your hitting even more. The recoil isn't that much more then a 12.:D

hirundo82
March 25, 2011, 09:45 AM
I am asking for help with what kind of hunting set up i should use for duck or pheasant. I was thinking more on the lines of either a .410, 20 Gauge, or a .22 LR. I was leaning more toward a .22lr because im very comfortable with the .22 and confident in my marksmanship with my 10/22.

Shotgun with capacity limited to 3 shells or less is the only legal firearm for migratory game birds per federal law.

oneounceload
March 25, 2011, 10:16 AM
Depending on where you live, waterfowl AND upland migratory birds may need to be hunted with non-toxic shot, especially on many state preserves. Check your local laws.

You are not allowed to use any rifle in the taking of game birds. Pests, like crows, are a different manner

Art Eatman
March 25, 2011, 11:14 AM
"... I do not want to ruin too much meat."

That's very rarely a problem with any gauge of shotgun. 12-gauge on dove, for instance: Rarely do more than two or three pellets actually hit the bird.

Odds are, you'll do okay if you buy a 12-gauge which suits you (pump, semi-auto, double) and which fits properly. Screw-in chokes aren't a necessity, but they sure make life better.

Fit: Mount the gun to your shoulder with a good cheek-weld, with your eyes closed. When you open your eyes, you should be looking right down the top of the barrel, centered, and the top of the receiver should be in alignment with the front bead. Same deal as when picking out a rifle.

If the bead is high, you'll shoot over a bird. Low? You'll shoot under.

Then get with some knowledgeable shotgunner and get some instruction. He can help you work out on a case of claybirds and explain about patterning and all that learning-curve stuff. :)

birddog
March 25, 2011, 01:00 PM
One of the guns I truly regret getting rid of was my last 20 gauge. I think it's great for everything from woodcock & squirrels right on up to pheasants and ducks, and don't let anyone tell you that you can't kill turkeys and geese with it either.

For me, a 20 gauge side-by or pump is truly a jack of all hunting trades.

chas08
March 25, 2011, 05:33 PM
You are not allowed to use any rifle in the taking of game birds. Pests, like crows, are a different manner Not totally true in Texas, turkey can be taken with a rifle in the fall season and in most counties during the spring season, unless it's changed in recent years. Sounds to me like the OP needs a 12ga in whatever action he prefers.

lizziedog1
March 26, 2011, 01:38 AM
One of the guns I truly regret getting rid of was my last 20 gauge. I think it's great for everything from woodcock & squirrels right on up to pheasants and ducks, and don't let anyone tell you that you can't kill turkeys and geese with it either.



You must be joking! Everyone knows that the 20 gauge is like the 30-30. Both are useless and incapable of killing anything of any size outside of very close range.

The best wingshooters I know use 28 gauge shotguns. They do not miss.

Grumulkin
March 26, 2011, 07:05 AM
Though it probably doesn't apply in the case of Spcl, in Ohio permits can be obtained for shooting Canada Geese with a rifle if they're causing a nuisance.

As for shotguns, a .410 or 28 is more for an expert. I guess if you're an expert, you won't miss much. Actually, I don't think I've ever met anyone that hunted birds with either one of those.

The idea for using an 8 or 10 gauge is a good one except in most areas, an 8 gauge would probably be illegal for hunting migratory birds to say nothing of the fact that ammo and shotguns for either of those chamberings are a bit difficult to come by.

I did see one case where a shotgun ruined too much meat. It was whilst sea duck hunting. A duck was down in the water but still swimming so my hunting partner shot it from a range of maybe 20 feet with a 12 gauge which stopped it; at least what was left of it.

Spcl
March 26, 2011, 09:18 AM
So now im thinking 12 gauge semi-auto. Sound good? Would you people rather use a pump or semi-auto?

Sunray
March 26, 2011, 01:09 PM
Where you are matters. However, hunting ducks and all other migratory birds with a rifle is illegal by International treaty. That's where the 3 rounds-in-the-gun law comes from too. Most likely illegal for pheasants too. Knowing your State's hunting regulations is essential.
A 12 guage semi-auto with changeable chokes will do nicely. You may want to think about a 'combo'. Gives you a smooth bore with changeable chokes and a rifle sighted smooth or rifled barrel for deer. Which brand doesn't really matter. A Mossberg M930 combo will cost you a bit less than a Remington 1100/11-87 though.

Art Eatman
March 26, 2011, 09:55 PM
I've used pump (Model 12 Winchester) and semi (Beretta 390) in 12-gauge, and my wife's Browning Lightning over/under 20-gauge. And various others. I never have really been comfortable with a side-by-side double gun. Dunno why.

Odds are, I guess I'd go with the Beretta or equivalent. Doesn't seem harsh on recoil, even with Winchester Omigawd high-brass loads.

Now, an old Model 12 that you can play slide-trombone is a lot of fun, particularly since the mag holds six rounds. Heavy, though. A Remington 870 can be modified to shoot the same way: Just hold the trigger back and crank on the pump. :)

Cob
March 26, 2011, 10:46 PM
I have one of each... An older remington model 1100 - (only shoots 2 3/4" shells), that's semi-automatic; & a Mossberg 835 pump that shoots 3.5 inch magnum shells - both shotguns are 12 gauge. (also have a 20 gauge 1100)

I personally like the 835's 3.5" shell capacity and hunt with it more frequently.

a lot of used, older 12 gauges will not have this 3"+ capability, although you can get a better deal on one that way.

Spcl
March 27, 2011, 01:09 AM
Thank for all your help. I really appreciate all of your inputs.

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