Prudent or Paranoid?


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lizziedog1
March 31, 2011, 08:40 AM
Sometimes I read of threads here about folks that have several guns at the ready for the unthinkable. They might have an rifle, shotgun, and handgun ready for whatever might come through their doors in the middle of the night. I think some would even have an RPG ready if they could get away with it, Not only do they have all these guns ready, they have enough ammo nearby to arm a small army.

I, on the other hand, have one gun stashed for emergenies. It is not the only gun I own, but the only one I have ready for a HD scenario. I hope I never have to use it.

Am I fooling myself? Should I stash and have more firearms ready? Are the multi-gun folks being prudent, or are they paranoid?

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Ala Dan
March 31, 2011, 08:52 AM
To each his own, and think whatever you wish; thats human nature. But for me,
having worked in law enforcement almost 21 years; I stay focused on possible
unknown threats too me and my family, as there is just NO telling who, where,
or when a threat may come~! Some of the people that I have personally had
legitimate dealings with are murder'ers, rapist's, burglar's, and the like. They
are being released from state prisons [for various reasons] all of the time. Also,
they would think nothing of harming me or my family; at any given moment.
That is why I keep several firearms "at the ready", in various locations. Also,
I am now 64 years young, and not quite as quick as I once was; so I have to
use a distraction method to my advantage too gain the surprise on said type
of adversary~! ;) :) :D

JohnBT
March 31, 2011, 09:18 AM
I also have more than one fire extinguisher.

I back up my hard drives, too.

John

kingpin008
March 31, 2011, 09:40 AM
While there's certainly nothing wrong with having more than one firearm at the ready for emergency situations, you should also focus on other, arguable more important things like an adequate supply of food, water, medicines, and warm clothes. Firearms, while definitely useful in a catastrophic situation, are not your only concern.

Creature
March 31, 2011, 09:43 AM
I also have more than one fire extinguisher.

I back up my hard drives, too.

John

I think that John makes the point perfectly!

Persev
March 31, 2011, 10:00 AM
I like to have a gun in each room I am going to be in simply because you never know where in the house you will be if something requiring you be armed were to happen.I know I would really hate to be standing in say,the kitchen,and need the gun that is in the bedroom.

I think it is summed up by the old answer as to why we have guns..."I would rather have a gun and not need it than need a gun and not have it"

HGUNHNTR
March 31, 2011, 10:12 AM
I cannot fathom a negative repercussion of being more prepared. So you have some extra ammo, another gun in the nightstand...could this possibly be a negative in any situation? The more preparedness you practice, the greater the odds you will end up with a favorable outcome should the need ever arise.

Remo223
March 31, 2011, 10:17 AM
"I think some would even have an RPG ready if they could get away with it"

Your tone is insulting. Are you sure you are on the right forum?

JoeMal
March 31, 2011, 10:20 AM
Some say toe-may-toe, some say toe-mah-toe

Some think it's paranoia, some think it's prepared

I don't need to defend my thoughts or my actions to anyone

460Kodiak
March 31, 2011, 10:28 AM
+1 to JohnBT. Nicely put.

I keep two firearms in my home loaded and in easy reach. I have no kids to worry about, and my cats don't have thumbs to weild the loaded guns. I used to think it was paranoid, but then I realized a loaded gun in my bedroom would do me no good if I'm in my living room, and a home invasion situation occurs. I'd have to run past the intruder, dive across my bed, grab my gun, turn while on the bed, and shoot accurately. The chances of successfully accomplishing this seem slim to me. So I've decided to keep a gun in the two places in my home I am most likely to be in, if something bad were to happen. This just seems prudent to me given the, what appears to be (I have no stats to back it up), increase in home invasions. When I move into a bigger place and have more room, there may be a few more guns loaded and strategicaly placed around the home.

I say to each his own. If you feel safe enough with one gun in your home, then be content with that. It is more important to have it readily accesible than to have 20 loaded guns sitting around. I've heard many people state that they have a gun on their person from the time they get out of bed, until they get back into bed at night. I'm guessing that many THR members fall into this category. I do carry concealed, but I don't keep a gun on my person while in my home. If I felt the need to do that, then I'd be thinking about moving the hell out of that area. I just keep one within easy and quick reach. JMO

Oh yeah, I do stock my ammo reserves for a few select guns (namely the most practical and functional ones). I see no reason not to be prepared. With the condition of the world being what it is, and seemingly getting worse, I like to know I will be able to hunt and feed myself just in case there is an interuption in the availability of food. Nothing lasts forever, and I believe that applies to the American "fat cat" way of living as much as anything else. If it all comes crashing down, the gun owners are going to be the ones that can protect, feed themselves, and venture down to the river "safely" with their water filters and purifiers to stay hydrated. When it comes down to it, that's what a person needs to survive. Food, water, shelter, and a means to protect ourselves

Flfiremedic
March 31, 2011, 10:28 AM
I want immediate access to a weapon...home invasions happen in nice homes here...I owe it to my family to successfully defend my home and family. To that end, I have access to a defensive weapon at all times and under all conditions in my home...but they are part of a plan for my family to move-possiblly under fire to a true safe room...and the readily accessable handguns are there for use until I can get a long gun.
In regards to that, what do you see hunters discussing on deer size (150-250 lb) game? "Bang Flop". In my professional experience, this is most likely achieved with a long gun. Just my opinion.

Kleanbore
March 31, 2011, 10:30 AM
Posted by lizziedog1: I, on the other hand, have one gun stashed for emergenies. It is not the only gun I own, but the only one I have ready for a HD scenario. I hope I never have to use it.I did the same thing, for many years. Then I thought about it for the first time.

Am I fooling myself?Consider the layout of your home. Think about where you are likely to be at different times of the day and night; don't think that an emergency will only occur while you are in the bedroom. Consider the possible points of ingress for potential intruders. Then consider some scenarios.

In each one, would you end up having a foot race with the intruder to get to where you keep the gun? If so, would you leave a loved one unprotected? Or might you be cut off from your gun? What kind of kettle of fish would you be in if that happened?

Should I stash and have more firearms ready? That's one possibility. It wouldn't be a good one for me.

Some time ago, one of the gun writers wrote that he kept revolvers in various places in his house. I started thinking about it for the first time. Then, a couple of years ago, someone posed the question about carrying while at home. My first reaction was one of utter disbelief. What kind of paranoia....

Then I went through the thought process described above. For us, having one gun "stashed for emergencies" was not a prudent strategy. Having guns stashed here and there does not appeal to me. There was an obvious answer.

BBQLS1
March 31, 2011, 10:31 AM
Why would I be paranoid, I have a gun.... :)



People aren't paranoid because they have several guns at the ready. It might just make it easy to pick up a loaded one when you need one..... Nothing wrong with just having the one at the ready either.

BTW, I'd have an RPG if I could. I'd love to see what it could do, but I'm not sure where I could shoot it.

USAF_Vet
March 31, 2011, 10:55 AM
Prudent vs. Paranoid. It is all in the eye of the beholder. Some may look and see prepared, others may see paranoid.

If running convoys in Iraq (as well as a multitude of other things I did through out my career) taught me anything, it was anything can happen at any time. You've got to keep your head on a swivel and your eyes wide open. Now a lot of people will say 'of course, but that's over there. back home, you don't have to worry about those things.'
I disagree. Being at home leads one into a false sense of security. I doubt a mortar is going to come falling through the roof, so I'm not sleeping under my body armor, but that doesn't mean I'm immune to robbery, drive by shootings, grudge holding idiots, road ragers, or anyone else. All one has to do is watch the evening news, pick up the local paper, and use their brains for something other than processing Dacing with the Stars, et al, and they will realize the world we live in is dangerous. I'd rather be viewed as paranoid and be prepared, than not be prepared and viewed in a coffin.

ATBackPackin
March 31, 2011, 10:58 AM
Paranoia is a state of mind. Two individuals could have the exact same set up and one could be prepared while the other is paranoid. I remember how shocked I was when I first heard someone on here state that they carry inside of their home. Then I thought about it and thought about my current set up and layout of my home. At the time I had in my bedroom closet one handgun in a safe and a shotgun ready to go. If I was in my living room when someone, or a group of people, kicked in my front door I would have to run past them, up the stairs, to the bedroom, open closet, and then open safe to get to said gun. :what:

That is when I realized I had failed my family. I carry IWB and while I make it as comfortable as possible while I am out, I choose not to carry in the house. So instead I make sure that there is something available without having to cross avenues of possible danger. However that is my family, my home, and my state of mind. You just need to figure out what is the most prepared you can be and still feel safe with your family, in your home.

Shawn

TexasRifleman
March 31, 2011, 11:11 AM
I also have more than one fire extinguisher.

I back up my hard drives, too.


That's pretty much how I explain it to people, well put. I have fire insurance, car insurance, and some self defense "insurance" too. What's the difference?

In fact, in my lifetime I've needed quick access to a firearm more often than I've needed a fire extinguisher.

Neverwinter
March 31, 2011, 11:15 AM
If you are affluent enough to keep multiple guns around with the same manual of arms, all the more power to you. For the rest of us, simply not taking the CCW off when at home may be the better answer.

Gordon_Freeman
March 31, 2011, 11:24 AM
It would be nice to have a loaded gun hidden in every room, but I would worry about a burglary while no one was there. You can't hide anything from a thief.

Big Boy
March 31, 2011, 11:32 AM
It would definitely be different if I lived with others, but since I live alone I put things where I want to. My apartment Is basically two really big squares with a hallway connecting them.

The best option would technically be to carry at all times. But that's uncomfortable and unnecessary when in my own home. Therefore I have a shotgun leaned against my couch for living room and kitchen activities, and a handgun in my bedroom. Therefore I have a gun accessible anywhere except the bathroom.

I don't know when someone will want to come into my house unwelcome. But if they did, and I only had a gun in my bedroom, I would literally be blocked by they're entrance and unable to get to it.

So I think it depends on the situation. But yes, I would generally keep a loaded gun in every "section" of my house, not necessarily every room.

P.S. I actually probably would like to get a cheap surplus CZ or something to keep in the cabinet in my bathroom. Again because of the set up of my house, I would have the inability to get to any other weapon in my house before confrontation with whomever was coming in. I don't feel myself paranoid, but I believe if I am going to have a gun to protect my self, It should always be accessible. Because I can't plan when or if any one will plan to assault my household.

DAP90
March 31, 2011, 11:39 AM
I cannot fathom a negative repercussion of being more prepared. So you have some extra ammo, another gun in the nightstand...could this possibly be a negative in any situation?

I have a 3 three old son. Believe me, there are some very negative consequences to having another gun in the nightstand or anywhere else around the house thatís not secured in a safe.

In my house all guns have to be locked up or under my direct control. Itís not just a matter of explaining to kids to stay away from the guns. That wonít work. I do explain about daddies guns but heís 3, they donít think like we do.

I suppose I could buy multiple handgun safes and place those around the house but I havenít felt the need yet. Iím also not at the point where I would carry around the house.

Itís a risk/reward evaluation. I get home at 5:00. My son starts the bedtime process at 7-7:30, so I only have a little time to play with him. We roughhouse and play all over the house. I would never do that with a gun strapped to my waist. If I take it off temporarily itís outside of my direct control and it would only take one time for him to get to it first. I usually tire long before he does.

The risk of him hurting himself with a gun around the house is far greater than the risk of a home invasion at dinner time. Iím also not an ex-cop like the poster above. He has enemies I donít. I live in a nice neighborhood, in a townhome, with neighbors on both sides. It would take some brazen home invaders to hit us.

Should that all change maybe my strategy will as well.

Am I right or wrong? Who knows, but Iíve made the decision I am comfortable with.

As I said above, the other viable alternative is to put a handgun safe in the more popular rooms; expensive but doable.

Towboater
March 31, 2011, 11:48 AM
I did keep loaded guns in several rooms in the past. Now I just move it with me from room to room. I thought about it an would hate for an unarmed person breaking into my house to suddenly become armed with one of MY weapons. I swear if somebody shot me with my own gun I would be SO pissed!


Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.

JohnBT
March 31, 2011, 12:00 PM
"The best option would technically be to carry at all times."

I do, it's a Rohrbaugh R9 and it never leaves my pocket. However, I like having something a bit larger for a backup gun. Currently it's an FNP-45 USG with 15-round mags. Well, and a couple of shotguns.

Anyone here who has not read about the jewelry store heist here in Richmond years ago? Talk about being prepared with stashed guns.

"Lead and diamonds: the Richmond jewelry store shootout - The Ayoob Files"

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BTT/is_163_27/ai_99130342/

"Baker had purchased eleven Rossi .38 Specials, five-shot snubbies, and laid them out at ten foot intervals behind the counters, invisible to the public but readily accessible to staff. All were loaded with Remington 125 grain semi-jacketed hollow points. " The store had a shotgun and a .44 Mag too.

The crooks, experienced killers and bank robbers, etc...

"Pappy unlimbers his double-barrel, 12 gauge sawed-off shotgun and Tom draws one of the two handguns tucked in his belt, a 1911 .45 auto. They roll ski masks down over their faces and burst through the door."

hso
March 31, 2011, 12:09 PM
Am I fooling myself?

Probably not. If you live in a neighborhood bad enough to actually need all that you should probably be looking to spend that money moving to a new neighborhood or hardening your house to keep the goblins out.

If you just want the hardware and feel the need to justify it for some reason it makes as good an excuse as any other.

"Beware the man with one gun. ..."

kingpin008
March 31, 2011, 12:09 PM
Your tone is insulting. Are you sure you are on the right forum?

Lighten up, Francis. If you've read some of the SHTF threads that have popped up here in the past, you'd see that there are indeed some individuals that are...over-exuberant, to say the least.

sixgunner455
March 31, 2011, 12:32 PM
I live in a nice neighborhood, in a townhome, with neighbors on both sides. It would take some brazen home invaders to hit us.

Right. Brazen home invaders with guns and duct tape. That's the point, and why I carry a gun in my pocket when at home, until I go to bed. Playing with little kids, mine or anyone else's - doesn't deter me from it - they're not going to get their grubby little hands on it.

DAP90
March 31, 2011, 01:00 PM
Those guys do exist and tragedies happen because they do but I personally judge the risk of that to be far, far less than the risk of something bad happening because I’m wrestling on the floor with an rambunctious 3 year old with a gun in my pocket or IWB.

As with others I have insurance, multiple fire extinguishers and back up my hard drives. I don’t have an extinguisher in every room (or carry one with me to each room), the absolute best insurance money can buy or offsite storage for my backups.

I evaluate the risks and determine the level to which I am willing and able to respond. This will change with time and circumstances.

I don’t think it’s paranoid to carry in the house. I’ve just evaluated doing so as more dangerous than the situation it is designed to protect against; for me at least.

matty-vb
March 31, 2011, 01:18 PM
I currently have a shotgun and pistol accessible both upstairs and downstairs in my home. that being said, my first child is to be born in the next week or so, which will have considerable impact on my home defense set up. for me it will be no loose and/or loaded guns in the house. period. even if I wanted it, momma bear sets the rules. I have picked up a few used Louisville sluggers from sporting good stores around the home for my wife and I. not my first choice, but better than fisticuffs I guess.

birddog
March 31, 2011, 01:28 PM
A lot of people would say that YOU are paranoid, just for having that single gun. It's all a matter of perspective.

I keep one accessible on each of the 2 floors of my home. I'm not concerned with a foot-race, as another person mentioned. My dog will be vigorously preventing any home invaders from any racing of any kind -- while I get the gun. I'm hoping that they're crying and begging for mercy before I ever have to bear arms. She's a chocolate lab with a very, very defensive streak......

leadcounsel
March 31, 2011, 04:53 PM
Google Dr. William Petit and read the story of the Conneticut man who fell asleep on his couch and was subdued by burglars that broke in, beat him senseless, and threw him in the basement. Then they robbed, beat and raped his wife and two teenage daughters. The man crawled to the neighbors for help, called the cops, and the cops waited.

Meanwhile the murderes killed the wife, tied the daughters to their beds, poured gas all over the house and kids, and burned them alive.

Bet he wishes he'd have had a gun hidden somewhere in the house, like the basement, for just such an event. He could have saved them instead of crawling to the neighbors like a helpless wounded animal...

NG VI
March 31, 2011, 05:11 PM
We roughhouse and play all over the house. I would never do that with a gun strapped to my waist.


Why not? You carry in a proper holster don't you?

Skyshot
March 31, 2011, 05:28 PM
To each thier own, I have guns for plinking, I have guns for hunting, and I have guns for protecting the home front. I cannot shoot them all that's for sure, but I have a few at the ready just in case. We can't dial 911 where we live and expect a quick response. It's a nice area but one never knows when the" Big Bad Wolf " might show up for dinner! Added note, all in this household are firearms proficient. Hope it never comes to anything like that but we want to be able to defend ourselves.

DAP90
March 31, 2011, 06:28 PM
Why not? You carry in a proper holster don't you?I do. Itís even a good one specifically fitted to the gun and the aftermarket grips I put on it; but itís a device, and devices fail. I wouldnít trust it to absolutely keep a handgun secure while rolling on the ground.

Holsters are tight enough to keep the gun in place but not so tight as to hinder the draw. They can and will fall out.

I wonder what the statistics are. At what time of day do home invasions typically happen? Where are the homeowners usually located at the start of the home invasion? Whatís the typical number of assailants?

Iíd also be curious to see how many parents with young kids keep guns stashed around the house or carry all the time in the home and if they do; what precautions do they take?

merlinfire
March 31, 2011, 06:41 PM
Nothing wrong with being prepared. Since we cannot predict the future, there can be no such that as being too prepared.

However, it is possible to be so prepared that it makes others feel uncomfortable, for whatever reason. Maybe its because it reminds them how vulnerable and unprepared they are, or how much they rely on others for their physical and financial security.

Paranoia is seeing a threat that does not exist. People who prepare are not seeing threats, but hedging bets.

suzukisam
March 31, 2011, 06:42 PM
I wonder what the statistics are. At what time of day do home invasions typically happen? Where are the homeowners usually located at the start of the home invasion? Whatís the typical number of assailants?
my cousin was taken out of her house as a little girl by three gange banger hoodrats in the middle of the night.. I won't tell you what happened for the 24 hours it took to find her but imagine the worst... there is no such thing as paranoid, only levels of preparation...

merlinfire
March 31, 2011, 06:51 PM
here is no such thing as paranoid, only levels of preparation...

People talk often in terms of "likelihood", as if the things that are least likely to happen don't happen rarely, but in fact never happen.

We see this often when talking about being prepared for assailants with body armor.

Stevie-Ray
March 31, 2011, 06:57 PM
Where I live right now, I consider it well prepared to be carrying everywhere, including inside the house. Where I'm moving, some consider it paranoia to even own a gun not built to take game. Tough. Nothing will change for me when I move. If somebody calls me paranoid, I'll call them unprepared. If they ask why, I'll explain it to them.

buck460XVR
March 31, 2011, 07:45 PM
I evaluate the risks and determine the level to which I am willing and able to respond. This will change with time and circumstances.




......best answer so far.

lizziedog1
March 31, 2011, 10:52 PM
My favorite part of the NRA publications is the part with stories of plain folks properly and legally defending themselves with guns. I don't recall all the details of all the ones that I have read, but I don't remember a home owner having to use more than one gun.

Most of the stories go something like this. A guy or two breaks into someones home. The owner grabs a gun, usually a handgun, fire a shot or two, and the intuders take off. Sometimes they are hit, sometimes they are not. But the homeowner saved his bacon with a gun.

I have yet to read one that goes like this. Seventeen people broke into a home. The owner laid out two with his pistol and grabbed his shotgun. Five more bad guys were dropped and then he was able to get his rifle out. Five more were hit and the others fled the scene.

Can anyone post a link or story that follows the second scenario here? I suppose it could happen. I suppose being prepared for it might be wise. But heck, I live not far from area 51. Something might invade my home that bullets won't hurt due to a force field. Maybe I should somehow prepare for that possibility.:eek:

fatcat4620
March 31, 2011, 11:40 PM
I don't keep one in every room but I have a nightstand gun and hi powered light and I keep a shotgun in a closet in a central location for all the other times.

yyz
April 1, 2011, 12:24 AM
buck460XVR

Originally Posted by DPotvin View Post

I evaluate the risks and determine the level to which I am willing and able to respond. This will change with time and circumstances.

......best answer so far.

yep what is right for me may not be right for you.

i lived in a place for awhile were i packed 24/7 and every room had a couple of guns. now not so much. heck were i am now the keys stay in the pickup and very rarely is there a loaded gun in the house. i will be getting a ccw soon more to get around the mi handgun registration then about carrying. different time and place. so do what you think is right for were you are.

belercous
April 1, 2011, 12:32 AM
Firearms strategically placed about one's home is prudent.

Carrying two handguns is paranoid. (L.E.O.'s exempted)

Greyman
April 1, 2011, 01:04 AM
Prudent vs. Paranoid...

When it comes to home defense preparedness to each his own. For me, I feel best when I'm armed. But honestly, it's not some heightened sense of anxiety that keeps me armed at home.

It just that I've carried a pistol on my hip my whole life. So my comfort zone is that it's always with me. It would feel strange to me if it wasn't there.

So, even in the house, eating dinner, watching a movie etc. I'm always armed. Yet it's not like I'm aware of it being there, or that it's something out of the ordinary. It's barely noticeable to me. Like my keys or my wallet, it's just always been there.

I don't worry about stashing a pistol in the bedroom, or one in the kitchen, etc. My pistol stays with me.

Stormin.40
April 1, 2011, 01:25 AM
DPotvin,

If you don't feel comfortable playing rough with your son on the floor while carrying you made the right decision, don't do it until you feel comfortable.

I have a 3 year old girl and we like to wrestle when I get home from work, we play pretty rough and I do so while carrying. I did have the same reservations and carried for months with dummy rounds until I felt safe, I feel very confident that my gun is secure. My daughter does know that I carry.

I also agree with you when it comes to keeping guns lock up with children in the house, I would think this would apply to grandparents too? My daughter has been taught not to touch a gun if found lying around but I don't know that I want to test her obedience with her life! If my guns are not on my side they are locked, period.

BLACKHAWKNJ
April 1, 2011, 01:38 AM
I have a flashlight in each room plus I wear one on my belt. Likewise part of home defense plan is a cell phone since a prudent invader will probably cut the land lines. Many people have a safe room where they can gather the family.
Carrying two handguns-isn't that what is called a "New York Reload"?

L-Frame
April 1, 2011, 01:48 AM
As long as there are no safety issues, whatever makes a person comfortable is OK with me. It can get a little weird though. I was in a gun shop once where the owner, a lady in her 40's, carried a glock 19 with 1 hi cap in the gun and 5 on her belt. Now this shop was the size of a public restroom. Having nearly 100 rounds of ammo in that case is extreme. She said that you just never know, but that's an example of paranoid, IMHO.

lizziedog1
April 1, 2011, 08:09 AM
Does having dogs change things a bit? We have dogs, harmless ones. But they do bark at anyone approaching our door. Our male mutt wouldn't hurt anyone. But he has one of the loudest, deepest barks around. From behind a door he sounds like a dog that will shread whatever dares open the door.

When our dogs bark, we look out the window to see who is approaching. It gives us a few seconds to arm ourselves if needed.

I do also understand part of this debates depends on where one lives. I made a choice a few years ago to move from a large city to a small rural town. I feel safer unarmed here then I did there with a safe full of guns.

FROGO207
April 1, 2011, 08:29 AM
I am a belt and suspenders type of guy.:scrutiny: I live in an area that is relatively low crime and don't sweat it quite so much as some. As said above it is about risk management and I am comfortable with my decisions.:D That said, nobody can prepare for every possible situation without fail and My situational awareness is always fluid. I am more worried about what may happen when I am not home. When I am home the odds are 90% prepared and that's OK IMHO.

alsaqr
April 1, 2011, 08:45 AM
There are are four S@W model 10 revolvers stashed around this house in addition to the model S@W model 66 in the bedroom and the Sig 210 on my person.

No i'm, not paranoid: Twice in my rather long life i have found it necessary to shoot gun armed home invaders.

kingpin008
April 1, 2011, 10:13 AM
Carrying two handguns is paranoid. (L.E.O.'s exempted)

Why? Guns are mechanical devices, and mechanical devices can malfunction. One of the ways to make a gun malfunction is by improper handling, which is very likely under high-stress conditions such as those that require the use of a gun.

Flfiremedic
April 1, 2011, 02:28 PM
To each his own, but "Brazen" is just what home invaders are. Why hit a home in a bad neighborhood...unless its gangbangers hitting a house with dope or dope money, they are going to hit a house with nice things, money, credit cards etc...read nice houses in nice neighborhoods.

B yond
April 1, 2011, 02:42 PM
If you already have the guns, why not keep them ready?

You may feel it's unnecessary, and hopefully it is, but what if it ever becomes immediately necessary and you weren't prepared as well as you could have been.

Better safe than sorry (says the guy with 3 fire extinguishers in the house, one in each car, smoke detectors in each room, and a plan for almost everything).

doc2rn
April 1, 2011, 03:11 PM
If its not on my person its not secured, my daughter is 9 yo (it flies by), she respects and wont touch a gun without my permission. We go shooting together, much to her grandma's dismay, and she has even claimed one of my rifles as her own. To which, I think it is "great"! When my daughter leaves my house she will do so with her own Rifle, Shotgun, and Pistol.
The one time I needed a gun and didnt have it, she was 2 and a half. CCW was illegal in KS then, and 2 guys started a shootout at the gas pump. All I could do was throw myself between the seats to use my body as a shield. Now CCW is legal, I will never be caught without my gun again.
I know its not home related, but you never know when your gonna need it. Keep it on you at all times to ensure the protection of you and those you hold dearest to your heart.

GRIZ22
April 1, 2011, 03:16 PM
Am I fooling myself? Should I stash and have more firearms ready? Are the multi-gun folks being prudent, or are they paranoid?
__________________


Whatever floats your boat.

Kleanbore
April 1, 2011, 03:50 PM
Posted by lizziedog1: My favorite part of the NRA publications is the part with stories of plain folks properly and legally defending themselves with guns. I don't recall all the details of all the ones that I have read, but I don't remember a home owner having to use more than one gun.

Most of the stories go something like this. A guy or two breaks into someones home. The owner grabs a gun, usually a handgun, fire a shot or two, and the intuders take off. Sometimes they are hit, sometimes they are not. But the homeowner saved his bacon with a gun.Reflect for just a moment on one simple fact: every story you see is about a successful encounter in which the homeowner was able to get to his gun.

Things do not always turn out that way by any means, and when they do not, you have to look somewhere other than The Armed Citizen to read the accounts, which may or may not be available to the public.

One more time, think about your home layout, about where you and yours are at different times, and how and where one or more violent criminal actors might gain access to your home.

Will you always be able to get to your gun? Will you have to leave someone unprotected when you try?

I have had to arm myself three times in serious encounters over the years; by chance I was in the bedroom with the gun when the red flag went up on two occasions, and one time I had to run for the gun. In my current house, I do not think that having one gun stashed is a good way to manage the risk.

By the way, in one of the incidents the perp, who came in and threatened murder, knew that the house was occupied. The other two should have known. All of these happened in low crime areas. One was in a remote mountain cabin.

I feel safer in my safe suburban neighborhood than I do in the country or in a lonely campground. The number of criminals out there is lower, but so is the number of targets available to them, and the kitchen light or porch light serves as a beacon for anyone in dire need of money or a different car.

The White Tiger
April 1, 2011, 05:13 PM
Sometimes I read of threads here about folks that have several guns at the ready for the unthinkable. They might have an rifle, shotgun, and handgun ready for whatever might come through their doors in the middle of the night. I think some would even have an RPG ready if they could get away with it, Not only do they have all these guns ready, they have enough ammo nearby to arm a small army.

I, on the other hand, have one gun stashed for emergenies. It is not the only gun I own, but the only one I have ready for a HD scenario. I hope I never have to use it.

Am I fooling myself? Should I stash and have more firearms ready? Are the multi-gun folks being prudent, or are they paranoid?
I'm new to this whole game myself, for 21 years I have only ever had a .22 rifle under the bed (and I only have that because my dad bought it for me when I was a kid).

Then Wall Street crashed, our politicians spent more money in a 2 year stretch than all the previous politicians in the history of the U.S. - combined, creating debt that my son's children will have to pay-off, unemployment has hit double digits (and pay no attention to the crap they're telling you about the improving numbers - if they calculated unemployment the same way as they did in 1930's, we'd be well over 10%). Historically, when unemplyment goes above 7% crime begins to climb.

The annual budget is almost entirely consumed by war/defense spending and social/welfare spending.

More people now work in government jobs (whose salary is derived from, and depends on, the taxes of non-government workers) than the combined industries of manufacturing, farming, fishing, forestry, mining and utilities...!

Why is any of this significant to your question? Well, you see, this "debt tsunami" we're piling up - will have to eventually be paid (or at least the things our politicians are putting us in debt for will cost something - they will have to eventually pay for some of the services they are forcing you to use). The people, or governments, we borrow the money from will want at least to be paid for the interest on their "loans" to us...

They have created a financial "shock" - whether you think that it was to "save" our economy, or "rescue" un-insured American's (or even illegal aliens)...the money they've spent in just two years - is shocking. Most of us can't comprehend it. That shock is like a financial earthquake - which has triggered a soon approaching, wave of debt, that will hit us when we least expect it, and subsequently when we can least afford it.

There is a term for sudden, unexpected tragedies that have long-term, unforseen impact; we call them "Black Swans". You see, Black Swans are very rare in nature...

Add the debt tsunami to the Indonesian earthquake/tsunami (which lifted the floor of the Indian Ocean by some 20 feet, for a few hundred miles, and killed an estimated 150,000 to 200,000 people) a few years ago, to the Japanese earthquake/tsunami (that ripped a 50 mile wide gap under the ocean, over about a 100 miles, causing 10's of thousands of deaths, and a nuclear meltdown on the scale fo 3 Chernobyl's)...factor-in whatever degree of responsibility you think belongs to the government for Katrina response, Haitian earthquake response, Chilean earthquake response, and the response to the massive oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico and...

add in the fact that our armed forces are fighting wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and now Libya (on top of large, ongoing deployments to Germany, North Korea, and Japan)...

...it begins to feel like a flock of "Black Swans" - my meaning is, they aren't so rare anymore. Now, "weired" is the new normal.

So, now my house has a shotgun, two 9mm pistols, and one Sig .45. To paraphrase one of the bloggers I follow; I'm also taking the advice of financial advisors; I'm investing in food manufacturers, clothing makers, ammunition makers, and gun manufacturers. The difference between what they recommend and what I'm doing is this: I'm accumulating the hard assets...I'm stocking food (first for each member of my immediate family, then for those I think may be caught unaware), I'm buying UV clothing (I live in the south), jeans, underwear, socks, and jackets. I'm also bringing in ammunition in bulk - in home defense rounds.

...I'm half-way to my goals, and once I get those initial areas covered, I'm going to invest in acquiring hard assets in alternative energy, precious metals, and maybe some farmland in the mid-west.

Your gut us right lizziedog1, you need to educate yourself and then follow your intuition. There is a reason you're asking the question...

DAP90
April 1, 2011, 05:17 PM
To each his own, but "Brazen" is just what home invaders are.

Home invasion is a brazen crime but my own thoughts on this were that typically, home invaders are going to hit the low hanging fruit. Theyíre going to hit a detached house, at night, reasonable isolated from its neighbors, where they can get in unseen and making a little noise wonít set off alarms.

I compared that to my own home; attached neighbors on two sides, good lighting in multiple locations, the nearest parking lot 50 yards away, across the street from the country club with its million dollar homes and police presence.

Iím playing the odds a bit but my risk is reasonably low. I do keep a gun ready to go in a handgun safe regardless. Would I benefit from buying another safe and putting that in another location in the house? Arguable, yes, I would. I will consider it.

As to carrying around the house; the benefits of a constant state of readiness did not outweigh my concerns given my level of risk.

If I get hit by a fringe example of psychopathic home invaders in body armor who donít mind daylight hours I will likely lose. That said I donít bother playing the lottery either.

B yond
April 1, 2011, 05:32 PM
I added a second quick access safe to the first floor of my home and stocked it with my old hi-point 9mm (laugh if you want, they're dirt cheap and mine has been 100% reliable with thousands of rounds through it). total investment there is under $250.

lizziedog1
April 2, 2011, 09:50 AM
Shortly after I moved here, I got a low level helicopter ride. We flew into the back country. Every once in awhile I would spot a home in the middle of nowhere. I coudn't even see any access to those homes. The people living there would have to be pretty much, one hundred precent, self-sufficient. Even electricity would have to be self-generated.

These homes would be almost impossible to locate from gound level. I have wondered what kind of person lives in these places. I wonder if they are like Reba and Michael Gross in Tremors.

Some of the responses here do sound paranoind. I am sorry, but that is my opnion. I am doubly sorry if I am wrong.

If someone is really so paranoid that they need to arm themselves to the hilt, wouldn't it make more sense to relocate to the middle of the Nevada desert? Or if heat and dryness is not their thing, the Alaskan outback? No amount of guns or ammo would make you safer then these folks living in virtual isolation.

I used to live in a large California metropolitan area. Even armed, I did not feel safe. I now live in a small desert community, I feel safe even unarmed. In fact, the only reason I even carry a weapon around here is for protection against feral dogs.

For me, life is too short to worry about things that may or may not happen.

btg3
April 2, 2011, 10:16 AM
...simply not taking the CCW off when at home may be the better answer.

I do not have a dog (aka: early warning system) and often read about how fast an assault occurs which makes it seem logical to be prepared NOW. Not prepared to go get a gun somewhere in the house, but to have a gun... right now.

Kleanbore
April 2, 2011, 10:39 AM
Posted by lizziedog1: No amount of guns or ammo would make you safer then these folks living in virtual isolation. I think you continue to misunderstand the point of why some people have more than one gun. After all, you only need one. But the question is, can you get to it if you need to in an emergency?

Have you analyzed your situation and made that determination?

I had presumed for decades that I would be able to, but upon just a little reflection, that turned out to be a most unrealistic assumption.

I feel safe even unarmed.Wonderful. So do most of my neighbors. However, that's a subjective feeling. In your case, if a desperate fugitive should happen to end up in view of your lights or mailbox, you will constitute his only available target. At that point, you will not be very safe at all, regardless of how you may feel.

lizziedog1
April 2, 2011, 12:31 PM
In your case, if a desperate fugitive should happen to end up in view of your lights or mailbox, you will constitute his only available target.

I do keep a gun on me most of the time. There is nothing wrong with that in my opinion. I recently got my CCW so that I can carry a gun away from my home. Before I got my CCW, I open-carried.

If on the other hand I felt the need to tuck a loaded gun into every corner of my house, then I would move into the Nevada outback. I would not want to live that worried.

buck460XVR
April 2, 2011, 12:57 PM
In your case, if a desperate fugitive should happen to end up in view of your lights or mailbox, you will constitute his only available target. At that point, you will not be very safe at all, regardless of how you may feel.

If and should are the two key words there, and the probability of it happening and the risk it COULD involve, needs to be compared to the probability of it not happening within each individual's situation/lifestyle. One's comfort level of preparedness also varies. As in ANY situation, some will be under-prepared and some will die of old age and their widow's new boyfriend will get all his toys.

I have a good friend that is a captain in the local PD. He is also the armorer of the department. We talk quite a bit about SD/HD and firearms. I brought this very topic up Thursday night during a conversation. He replied that in our town of 11,000 there has never been a home invasion(by a complete stranger) that led to the death of a homeowner in the 30 years he has been a LEO. That does not mean I'll unload my HD guns and put them in the safe, but it does tell me my chance of it happening, to me personally, is low. He also told me that studies show, you are more likely to be killed in your home by your own gun, either by accident or someone you know, than by a home invasion by a complete stranger. This also does not mean that my HD guns will be unloaded and put in the safe to protect me from a more imminent danger. It just tells me I need to be prudent and use good judgement. Just because one has lots of guns, does not make them more prepared than the man with one. There's a lot more to it than that.

DAP90
April 2, 2011, 01:04 PM
Some of the responses here do sound paranoind. I am sorry, but that is my opnion.


There's nothing wrong the responses. I certainly wouldn't call them paranoid. At worst, some of the things people do may be unnecessary; but they’re not hurting anybody or putting anyone at risk (I hope) and they are more prepared for certain types of events than I am.

Losov
April 2, 2011, 01:11 PM
I, on the other hand, have one gun stashed for emergenies. . . . . . the only one I have ready for a HD scenario.




If the weapon is stashed, it is not ready for HD.

DAP90
April 2, 2011, 01:19 PM
Things aren't that black and white. He may not be as ready as someone who carries 24/7, but that does not mean he is not ready for the level of threat he perceives as likely.

He is more ready than someone with no loaded weapons or no weapons at all.

IMTHDUKE
April 2, 2011, 01:26 PM
Whatever cranks your tractor. I only prepare for my preceived threats and not for other peoples that will be different depending on where they live, bad neighborhood, access to house as far as alarms, etc.

I could deal with most threats that are the average home invasion type, but if an army of storm troopers with full auto weapons lay seige to the place. It would be over run with a good fight put up by me. That would be the very low percentage possibility.

You could prepare for a predator drone attack....and if that makes you feel more secure....that's fine with me.

There is somewhere on that line you reach the level of diminishing returns...that level is determined by you. If you feel safe and sufficient with a 45 by the bedside....go for it.

Claude Clay
April 2, 2011, 03:16 PM
sometimes i forget to take em off when i get home, but that is not my methodology for home SD. i am in a split level and a number of BHP's are 1 step from being operational and located where i can retreat to should someone(s) move against me. thus i am moving away from danger and towards a position of strength--and a phone (unless the wires are cut; than its a crap shoot whether or not i have my cell on me).
the layout of your home constrains your SD plan; so to if you have juveniles in ( or that may be in) your dwelling.

The White Tiger
April 2, 2011, 04:22 PM
I do keep a gun on me most of the time. There is nothing wrong with that in my opinion. I recently got my CCW so that I can carry a gun away from my home. Before I got my CCW, I open-carried.

If on the other hand I felt the need to tuck a loaded gun into every corner of my house, then I would move into the Nevada outback. I would not want to live that worried.
You can judge my preparedness as paranoia if you want, that gives me license to judge your refusal to deal with reality as Pollyana (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Pollyanna)...

If you look at it in terms of gambling, I'll see your "Pollyana" and raise...a hedge (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hedge).

If the worst never happens, and the "new normal" is 8.5 mega-quakes that spawn once-in-every-1500-years...every 4 years...and you're ok with folks you don't know, enslaving your grandchildren to pay-off what they think you need...and you actually believe the way you pay off your Visa card is to apply for a Mastercard with a bigger credit line...that the largest freeze dried food company in the world, can't keep up with the orders for "food storage"...does NOT mean people around the world feel that oil and food will be hard to come by...that having more people work in government jobs than those of 6 combined private sector industries...that high unemployment WON'T have any effect on crime...then you probably won't care if a silly, goofy, sad, pathetic "prepper" clings to his God and his guns (and his years supply of food & ammunition)....?

but if the worst DOES happen...why is it folks like you always come looking for folks like me...in order to TAKE what I've earned and set aside...and GIVE it to folks like you who live in LALA land (mostly on the left coast)?

I'm ok with you laughing at me if it doesn't happen...ONLY if you'll be ok with me laughing at you if it does...

OK?

See, I can always eat (and shoot) my hedges.

Can you?

Stevie-Ray
April 2, 2011, 06:34 PM
I have had to arm myself three times in serious encounters over the years; by chance I was in the bedroom with the gun when the red flag went up on two occasions, and one time I had to run for the gun. In my current house, I do not think that having one gun stashed is a good way to manage the risk.I carry pretty much all the time no matter which house I'm in. In the present house, it's because the threat is greater. The house is quite small, and I'd probably be able to get to a weapon in time, but the crime rate is high enough that I don't want to take that chance. At the new house, the crime rate is virtually nil, but the house is so sprawling that I would literally have to run for a weapon if the unheard of happened, so instead of taking that chance, I still carry all the time.

Onward Allusion
April 2, 2011, 07:34 PM
The White Tiger (http://www.thehighroad.org/member.php?u=149874)

Quote: Originally Posted by lizziedog1 http://www.thehighroad.org/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7210312#post7210312)
Sometimes I read of threads here about folks that have several guns at the ready for the unthinkable. They might have an rifle, shotgun, and handgun ready for whatever might come through their doors in the middle of the night. I think some would even have an RPG ready if they could get away with it, Not only do they have all these guns ready, they have enough ammo nearby to arm a small army.

I, on the other hand, have one gun stashed for emergenies. It is not the only gun I own, but the only one I have ready for a HD scenario. I hope I never have to use it.

Am I fooling myself? Should I stash and have more firearms ready? Are the multi-gun folks being prudent, or are they paranoid?

I'm new to this whole game myself, for 21 years I have only ever had a .22 rifle under the bed (and I only have that because my dad bought it for me when I was a kid).

Then Wall Street crashed, our politicians spent more money in a 2 year stretch than all the previous politicians in the history of the U.S. - combined, creating debt that my son's children will have to pay-off, unemployment has hit double digits (and pay no attention to the crap they're telling you about the improving numbers - if they calculated unemployment the same way as they did in 1930's, we'd be well over 10%). Historically, when unemplyment goes above 7% crime begins to climb. <SNIP>

I think you get it. Although this is definitely not a SHTF type forum, there is much truth in what you wrote.

Onward Allusion
April 2, 2011, 07:36 PM
lizziedog1 (http://www.thehighroad.org/member.php?u=138884)


Quote:
In your case, if a desperate fugitive should happen to end up in view of your lights or mailbox, you will constitute his only available target.
I do keep a gun on me most of the time. There is nothing wrong with that in my opinion. I recently got my CCW so that I can carry a gun away from my home. Before I got my CCW, I open-carried.

If on the other hand I felt the need to tuck a loaded gun into every corner of my house, then I would move into the Nevada outback. I would not want to live that worried.

Wait a minute... You have a gun on you most of the time yet you think others who stash guns around the house for quick/easy access are paranoid???

Seriously, to each their own...

I carry at home AND have guns stashed throughout the house. I guess I should be locked up in the looney bin! :rolleyes:

danprkr
April 2, 2011, 07:47 PM
Plan for the worst, hope for the best. That's my motto.

lizziedog1
April 2, 2011, 09:35 PM
How do some guys mow their lawns? They are vulnerable to attack, espically because of the noise of the machine and the concentration required not slice a toe off. It is a distraction. Does a spouse keep them covered?

How about showers, espically when washing their hair? For those few moments someone could enter their home and blind side them. The shampoo can even blind them, giving the intruder an added upper hand. Do they have a dog standing by the bathroom door to give them advanced warning?

What if they and thier significant other are in a romantic mood? As a guy, during certain activities, I would be unaware of a meteor crashing into my neighbors house. Do they reposition thier guns so as the to interfere with the fun?

If someone lives in a situation that requires multiple guns to stashed everywhere, how does that person do everyday things? I know I am coming across as a smart alec. But I can't imagine living in such state of fear that my very existence depends on guns.

Ole Coot
April 2, 2011, 10:34 PM
I don't live in a "state of fear" but I do keep a 12ga with around 7 OObuck downstairs, easily reached. A 30-30 upstairs by the door and don't remove my carry weapon as I don't have children, close neighbors and have alarms, motion detectors, dog plus. I have a few hundred acres at my back on a dead end road and a little beagle that would make a snack for the coyotes and now ferrell dogs. The meth problem plus home invasions and my age may make you think I am paranoid but in the '60s I kinda got into the habit of sleeping with my rifle, and we were encouraged to do so. I am very confident of my ability with several weapons or none yet I chose to cover all bases if possible.

The White Tiger
April 2, 2011, 11:40 PM
How do some guys mow their lawns? They are vulnerable to attack, espically because of the noise of the machine and the concentration required not slice a toe off. It is a distraction. Does a spouse keep them covered?

How about showers, espically when washing their hair? For those few moments someone could enter their home and blind side them. The shampoo can even blind them, giving the intruder an added upper hand. Do they have a dog standing by the bathroom door to give them advanced warning?

What if they and thier significant other are in a romantic mood? As a guy, during certain activities, I would be unaware of a meteor crashing into my neighbors house. Do they reposition thier guns so as the to interfere with the fun?

If someone lives in a situation that requires multiple guns to stashed everywhere, how does that person do everyday things? I know I am coming across as a smart alec. But I can't imagine living in such state of fear that my very existence depends on guns.
I think you are not so different from those you're trying to mock...no one who trusts their world and their environment...carries a gun secreted on their person, most of the day...

Perhaps you are where many of us were just a few short months ago, it's one of the stages of grief for what we instinctively know was the dying of the light...in the last candle on earth.

Your stage is denial.

Your actions denote that you know this to be true - you just can't bring yourself to believe it...yet.

I am sorry for seemingly highjacking the thread - but the question asked by the OP, was why are so many buying multiple guns...and whether these folks were prudent, or paranoid....

I found that an interesting question and answered from my own recent motivations. I would say I came to my current position similar to the way Hank Reardon came to understand the concept of a "producer's strike" in Atlas Shrugged.

I don't expect everyone to agree, I actually resisted for a very long time myself, but so much has happened that I'm forced to conclude that either some very smart men suddenly became incompetent, or this was done purposely (with or without their compliance) - my own answers to either of those questions, did not comfort me.

I just think it coallesced as I developed my response...

BLB68
April 3, 2011, 02:27 AM
I prefer to keep a weapon at hand, rather than several stashed throughout the place. My place is a one bedroom apartment, so not too big anyway.

At the end of the day, it's a personal decision, and I don't see any amount of pro/con points swaying anyone who's already set in their ways.

lizziedog1
April 3, 2011, 09:33 AM
I am going to type the following statement more slowly and in bigger letters:

I am expressing my opinions.

I am not stating facts or figures.

merlinfire
April 3, 2011, 10:19 AM
Shortly after I moved here, I got a low level helicopter ride.

So YOU'RE the guy in the black helicopters I keep seeing!

Kleanbore
April 3, 2011, 11:57 AM
Posted by buck460XVR: If and should are the two key words there, and the probability of it happening and the risk it COULD involve, needs to be compared to the probability of it not happening within each individual's situation/lifestyle.The likelihood that a violent criminal actor will invade one's home while a resident is in it is remote at best, for most people.

Someone looking for jewelry or something else that can be readily fenced (copper pipe is the really big draw where I live these days--several incidents occur each week) would prefer to enter an unoccupied home than one in which the residents are home. That's why most break-ins occur in mid day when people are at work.

So--if the perps are in that game, they will either opt for a different target if they realize that someone is at home; come back later if they are seeking something specific, for example if they have been tipped off by a repair man or have been in the house before and know what they are looking for; or, of course, they may not realize that someone is at home and come in. The last of these has happened to me.

That's not the only kind of criminal out there, however. If a couple of crooks need a great deal of money right now, the best way to get it is to take one person to an ATM while holding another hostage.

And of course, if they are on the run and low on gas and there is no other house around....

I have a good friend that is a captain in the local PD. ... He replied that in our town of 11,000 there has never been a home invasion(by a complete stranger) that led to the death of a homeowner in the 30 years he has been a LEO.That is true in my city of 24,000 people also. However, a number of criminals have been deterred here by homeowners with guns, including me.

He also told me that studies show, you are more likely to be killed in your home by your own gun, either by accident or someone you know, than by a home invasion by a complete stranger. I really doubt that he can substantiate that.

Back when the notoriously ant-gun J. Edgar Hoover headed the FBI, the government published some findings that alleged that people were more likely to shoot a friend or family member than a burglar. The intended conclusion was that having a gun is more likely to make on less safe than more safe.

It was not until people started digging into the statistics that it became clear that that statistic included people who had known each other in any capacity at all before the shootings occurred--which just happens to include the victims in just about every drug related crime that has ever occurred!

The stats were later further distorted by those who publicized the number of children killed by guns. Guess what: that included anyone nineteen and under, and a lot of violent criminals shot by police officers fall into that category.

But the real fallacy in the argument is that if a gun is not used to shoot someone, it has not served its purpose. Enough said. For more, go here (http://gunfacts.info/).

In any kind of risk management, the likelihood of occurrence of risk is but one factor. The severity of the potential consequence is equally important. I consider the likelihood of my ever needing to even threaten to employ deadly force to be remote. However, I consider the consequence of being attacked to be very severe indeed.

So, the decision at hand is to either accept the risk or to try to mitigate it. That's true whether the analysis has to do with smoke detectors, fire extinguishers, surge protectors, or--you name it

It just tells me I need to be prudent and use good judgement. Just because one has lots of guns, does not make them more prepared than the man with one. There's a lot more to it than that.Well said, and if one's firearm is one's first line of home protection, one has a lot of work to do!

buck460XVR
April 3, 2011, 01:04 PM
He also told me that studies show, you are more likely to be killed in your home by your own gun, either by accident or someone you know, than by a home invasion by a complete stranger.



I really doubt that he can substantiate that.

Back when the notoriously ant-gun J. Edgar Hoover headed the FBI, the government published some findings that alleged that people were more likely to shoot a friend or family member than a burglar. The intended conclusion was that having a gun is more likely to make on less safe than more safe.

It was not until people started digging into the statistics that it became clear that that statistic included people who had known each other in any capacity at all before the shootings occurred--which just happens to include the victims in just about every drug related crime that has ever occurred!

Again, my LEO friend acknowledged this by the last two words in my quote......a "complete stranger". Casual and close friends, ex-boyfriends/girlfriends, prior drug deals and other partners in crimes are not "complete strangers" that invade your house by mere chance. Those type of invasions are predetermined and planned either by greed, jealousy or revenge. My friend did not give me the source of his statistics, but he did refer to most of the gun-related deaths in the 4 county area in the last few years. Of the victims involved, that were killed in their home, most of them knew their attacker. Many of the victims opened the door for their assailant. One of the few exceptions was a young girl killed in her home by a gang related drive by shooting.....not really a home invasion that could be deterred by having a gun at arms length in every room. I agree that statistical evidence can be manipulated to prove most anything. Real life evidence is much more visible and harder to manipulate. Again, this is how things are where I live. I know it is not how things are everywhere. Just because I do not have bars on my doors and windows......does not mean there are areas where that is not an option.

Funny thing was, this same friend told me that 90% of the calls he responds to, other than traffic incidents are due to three things. Alcohol, drugs and jealousy. He said if you take those three things outta the picture, his life would be very dull.




In any kind of risk management, the likelihood of occurrence of risk is but one factor. The severity of the potential consequence is equally important. I consider the likelihood of my ever needing to even threaten to employ deadly force to be remote. However, I consider the consequence of being attacked to be very severe indeed.



I agree. As I said in my last post, my SD/HD guns are not unloaded and locked in the safe either. I also have a large dog that altho not a chronic barker, lets it be known whenever someone is close or there is a sound in the night. I feel he is as much of a deterrent to the random invasion than all of my guns.

The White Tiger
April 3, 2011, 05:33 PM
I am going to type the following statement more slowly and in bigger letters:

I am expressing my opinions.

I am not stating facts or figures.
Let me correct a flaw in your current argument. We aren't attacking your opinion,

It's a response based upon the fact that you don't have the right to characterize those of us with differing opinions as paranoid.

You may feel that bringing a knife to what MAY end up as a gunfight - shows proper restraint and decorum - but to many it means you won't be prepared.

Your response will only work if you've been given enough information to properly diagnose the threat. My response works when I don't think my government will be capable of meeting such HUGE commitments - and if it becomes big enough to meet the commitments it is now making - it will be too big (and as we have been warned "any government big enough to give you what you need, is also big enough to take it away from you...")

My response will make sure I have the proper response to a fight I don't want to have in the first place.

bad guys do bad things - when bad guys gain a lot of power they do a lot of bad things and create the environment for many bad men to get away with a lot of bad things.

...if you've ever been responisble for others, and guessed wrong - you won't ever put yourself in that position again.

but it doesn't really bother me in the least that you have moved away from the threat to a nice quiet place where the threat level is lower (yet still have a gun secreted upon your person)...for now.

Some of us don't have the ability to simply uproot and move away from bigger threats - that means our response to bigger threats, must be...well...bigger.

See, you started from a position where you implied that either you were prudent (for owning ONE pistol, secreted on your person, and one hidden away for later), or we were paranoid (for having multiple weapons, stashed in various locations)...your subsequent responses force me to conclude that you are either naiive, or misinformed, perhaps you could clear that up for me now?

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