7.62 Nagant vs .32 S&W Long


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CZ-75BD
April 1, 2011, 12:10 AM
Hello, I just bought 1895 Russian Nagant.
But bullets is very expancive $30 for 50 rounds. On one of internet sites I found that revolver can use .32 S&W Long rounds. Is anybody tried that and is it safe?

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GCBurner
April 1, 2011, 12:13 PM
People say the gun is strong enough to fire the .32 S&W or even the .32 H&R Magnum, but I wouldn't do it, myself. I was born with 10 fingers, and I'd like to hang on to them. A few companies are making aftermarket replacement cylinders for the Nagants in .32 ACP, and maybe other .32 cartridges. That's the way I'd go, personally.

Hanzo581
April 1, 2011, 12:32 PM
Nevermind

cleardiddion
April 1, 2011, 01:05 PM
I've tried both .32 HR magnum and .32 S&w and they both work fine. If you reload the brass does tend to deform and bulge a bit though.

Onmilo
April 1, 2011, 01:14 PM
Expancive?:D

You Tube has several videos about shooting .32 S&W long from the Nagant revolver.
About the same sound and results as shooting .22 L.R. from a .22 Winchester Magnum.

AethelstanAegen
April 1, 2011, 07:06 PM
Mods: This post would be better placed in the Handgun: Revolver Section.

You can fire .32 S&W Long or .32 H&R Magnum from your Nagant revolver, and I have safely from my mine, but it is definitely not the round the gun was designed for...so you'll frequently have bulged/split cases and you'll need to be sure to clean between the cylinder and the barrel as you'll find a decent amount of lead deposit left after around 21 rounds (3 reloads). You can also buy a replacement .32acp cylinder but I hear the fit can be hit or miss.

Frankly, I've found that if you shop around you can find some decent deals and you can always find it for $21-22 for the 50rds of Prvi Partisan at AIM Surplus and Midway. I generally just buy from either of those and I've been very happy with both the ammo (which is quite accurate and fairly clean ammo...I would say much better than the fiocchi) and the sales practices of the vendors. To me, it's not usually worth the few bucks you save to bother with using non-standard ammo.

Enjoy your Nagant! They're a fun little pistol!

MrSpiffy
April 1, 2011, 08:08 PM
No offense intended, but...

A small bit of research into ammo prices could have told you how expensive it is to shoot this gun before you bought it. But, if you can order it for cheaper than purchasing it locally, you might find some better deals out there than the $30 per 50 rounds that you're seeing now.

In regard to your question about using .32 ammo, I would not take the risk of shooting ammo in a gun it was not designed for. Substituting .32 ammo because you don't want to buy the correct ammo for the gun would make me nervous. It may be safe, but I wouldn't do it, as I don't have the knowledge to make that judgment call.

Quiet
April 2, 2011, 06:34 PM
I have safely shot .32S&W Long and .32H&R Magnum out of my 1929 Tula M1859 Nagant revolver.
It may cause the cases to bulge, but it can be done.

DO NOT attempt to shoot .327Federal Magnum out of a M1895 Nagant revolver, unless you want it to kaboom.

I prefer shooting 7.62x38mmR out of it due to the clean up involved with shooting .32Long/.32Magnum (it's more messier).

Original Russian/Soviet military loading of the 7.62x38mmR cartridge was a 100gr FMJ @ 1100 FPS.
However, currently available commerical target loadings is anemic, usually a 98gr FMJ @ 850 FPS.

garyhan
April 2, 2011, 06:47 PM
This is a question that comes up on many boards and always evokes controversy. Of course, it is always best to use the round for which the gun was chambered. I have however, never heard of anyone hurt by firing .32S&W or .32 H&R. I have used the S&W round occasionally in my Nagants with good results. I have read that the .32 S&W is the round of choice for Nagant shooters in the Ukraine, where the Nagant round is said to be less available than here (hearsay only). The .327 is a death trap. Ii don't think there will be a difinitive answer unless there is a catastrophic accident with the S&W or H&R round. Such an accident did occur with the 7.62x25 cylinders that were once offered and quickly led to their demise.

gary

hardworker
April 2, 2011, 07:18 PM
I've shot plenty of 32 long out of my nagant and it's been fine. The brass bulges but the gun is built for more stress than the 32 long is ever capable of producing. Plenty of people shoot 32 magnum out of it and do fine. I see no reason to shoot 32 mag since it costs just as much as the real stuff

isc
April 2, 2011, 07:24 PM
I've shot alot of .32 S&W out of nagants. It splits the case more often than not so I wouldn't reload the cases under any circumstances.

At one point7.62 nagant ammo was extremely rare and expensive, but I've seen it for sale fairly recently. It is becoming more common, but is still expensive.

Jim K
April 2, 2011, 10:24 PM
If ammo cost is a concern, might I suggest buying an obsolete military pistol for a collectors item and buying a decent .22 for shooting?

Jim

isc
April 5, 2011, 12:59 PM
Awhile ago they sold a replacement cylinder for the nagants, I think it was .32acp, but it might have been 7.62x25. I think it was only safe for ammo loaded to .30 Mauser pressure and not 7.62 tokerev though.

hardworker
April 5, 2011, 01:34 PM
32 acp cylinders are floating round but cost about half what the gun itself costs. I've heard of the 7.62 tok cylinders but I've also heard that they were prone exploding.

Cosmoline
April 5, 2011, 01:40 PM
DO NOT attempt to shoot .327Federal Magnum out of a M1895 Nagant revolver, unless you want it to kaboom.

This bears repeating. You can get away with .32 H&R because in spite of the name it's not really a "magnum" round. .327 *IS*.

I'd stick with the rounds it was designed for, personally. They're more accurate, they give you that cool gas seal and they spit much less crud back at your glasses.

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