your favorite thing about black powder


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Busyhands94
April 3, 2011, 04:49 PM
what do you enjoy the most about black powder? for me it was the price, the fact i could legally own a firearm without paperwork, the fact i can order one through the mail. the fact i can make my own powder and cast my own ammo without much expensive accessories and reloading paraphernalia to buy. i can make my own ammo without having to spend a cent. just recover lead ammo, melt it, pour it, size it lube it, load it, shoot it again. black powder can be made without anything that requires an age limit. i am 17 and i can own one. the smell is nonintoxicating beautiful, the satisfying low pitched BOOM that echoes off the valley walls, the white cloud of smoke, the feeling of owning a firearm. all of that is why i love BP fire arms.

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Fingers McGee
April 3, 2011, 05:05 PM
All of the above, plus some???????

Busyhands94
April 3, 2011, 05:08 PM
darn straight. i wish i could add more but i wanted to keep it simple.

45-70 Ranger
April 3, 2011, 06:47 PM
Ahhhh, yeah, what Fingers said got it covered I do believe.:D

Busyhands94
April 3, 2011, 08:50 PM
i also like the availability of black powder gun kits. they are like models that serve a darn good purpose.

Pops
April 3, 2011, 08:50 PM
The flame:fire:, lovely smoke :evil: and the recoil..:what:..an' the earthshaking KaBOOM...

mesinge2
April 3, 2011, 08:55 PM
Nuff said....

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=139800&stc=1&d=1301878494

ontarget
April 3, 2011, 09:41 PM
yup, all of the above!!!!!

SAA
April 3, 2011, 10:08 PM
You forgot:

easy to clean
no leading

Busyhands94
April 3, 2011, 10:28 PM
i did. i have a NAA super companion coming to me in the mail by the way, i will post some pictures when i am done. it is stainless steel and that allows me to wash it with soap and water after a day of shooting. i also forgot, BP guns are beautiful. wonderful hardwood and brass that glistens in the light with a rich golden tone. not to mention REAL cowboys and cowgirls shoot black powder. it's a known fact. also you can't tell me with a clear conscientious that if you are holding a Colt Walker that you don't feel totally bad**s. the Colt Walker was the original .44 Magnum handgun. and in that context the M in "Magnum" deserves capitalization. it's what Dirty Harry's great great grandfather used to blow stuff away. and i forgot that part. you get such a rush from blowing things away with a BIG gun. it feels good and relives stress.

WALKERs210
April 4, 2011, 12:32 AM
BP firearms are not unlike flying R/C model planes, in particular a J-3 Cub. Many say they don't want to mess with BP because of the clean up, and with the J-3 Cub everyone says oh its just a Cub. But when you break out a Hawkens or a really nice Colt everyone is crowding around just itching to fire a few rounds, and the J-3 Cub has same reaction, no one will leave until they see the Cub in the air. I just like to be different.

Remo223
April 4, 2011, 12:41 AM
here's a few more reasons:

you can buy kits and build your own
smoke
fire

Ever seen a black powder tattoo? I've got a few. When you shoot a black powder firearm, there's lots of powder flying out the barrel. If it hits you, the grains of powder burn into your skin and make a permanent black tattoo.

Prairie Dawg
April 4, 2011, 06:59 AM
Yep, everything that has been said + for me, muzzleloaders were my first guns. BP opened up the world of shooting for me & I still shoot it about 90% of the time.
--Dawg

SleazyRider
April 4, 2011, 07:20 AM
BP firearms are not unlike flying R/C model planes, in particular a J-3 Cub. Many say they don't want to mess with BP because of the clean up, and with the J-3 Cub everyone says oh its just a Cub. But when you break out a Hawkens or a really nice Colt everyone is crowding around just itching to fire a few rounds, and the J-3 Cub has same reaction, no one will leave until they see the Cub in the air. I just like to be different.
I'm feelin' ya, WALKERs210, I'm feelin' ya! And when you combine the two it makes for ... the perfect day!

http://i459.photobucket.com/albums/qq315/Magnageek/Remingtom1858001.jpg

http://i459.photobucket.com/albums/qq315/Magnageek/PB070001.jpg

Pete D.
April 4, 2011, 07:25 AM
Yep...all of the above. In addition.....some of the most beautiful firearms that I have ever seen have been muzzleloaders; many of those were made by their owners.
I also like the independence from much of the commercial parts of shooting and reloading. I don't have to buy primers for a flintlock; I cast my own round balls; I can, if need be, make my own BP (I have done this just to know the process). I do, most of the time use commercial BP but I do have the homemade option.
Pete

robert garner
April 4, 2011, 09:24 AM
I did not find any of your choices objectionable, and you left out many,perhaps one of the best was seeing my Mom, look in pot on the stove as I boiled my ROA the first time.Hitting my first milk jug at 100 yds while those with
cartridge arms...didn't. It could just be 'first love'; it will be the last pistol I give up.
robert

paul54
April 4, 2011, 09:32 AM
I like it all, plus the challenge of the hunt. :)

Yarddog
April 4, 2011, 09:49 AM
"[I like it all, plus the challenge of the hunt.]"

True Love hunting with BP. I have harvested some nice animals (Deer) & hogs with both Revolver & Rifle ; )
Y/D

Loyalist Dave
April 4, 2011, 10:00 AM
I like the nostalgia and beauty of the older designs, but it's mastery of an outdated technology that is challenging. Nothing wrong with taking a buck at 300 yards from a heated tower over a corn field using a .308 and a Leopold scope. The venison is just as tasty..., but I get much more satisfaction from taking a buck or doe at 100 yards or less when standing on the ground, with a light drizzle coming down, and I'm using a .54 caliber flintlock. The former is more like target shooting followed by meat cutting, the latter is much more skill oriented, for me at least. NOT throwing disparaging comments on anybody's method of hunting folks. I just like the aesthetics of mine better with a flintlock.

LD

WALKERs210
April 4, 2011, 04:54 PM
Sleazy that is what I'm talking about. Love the view from the Cub in fact I have been thinking about building a 1/3 scale and do ever step to detail it hope you don't mind but I copied the picture of the dash so I have a better reference.

Cosmoline
April 4, 2011, 05:01 PM
I'll pass on the small aircraft, but I do love the smell of holy black in the morning.

MCgunner
April 4, 2011, 05:53 PM
All of the above

ElvinWarrior
April 4, 2011, 06:30 PM
All of the above, and the fact, that with my period scoped 45/70 trapdoor I can take out a fly at 500 paces !!! It's kind of a misuse of the ol' girl, but FUN as HELL !!!

Plus... NOBODY can partay like a bunch of BP nuts toting their flints, wearing their skins and coons, out on a hunting/camping excursion !!!

http://i1176.photobucket.com/albums/x330/ElvinWarrior/FR0664.jpg

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David, "EW"

20x12ga
April 4, 2011, 06:35 PM
Cleaning them, now that there is powders like 777 that clean up so easy compared to years ago when it was almost too much work to enjoy shooting them for the time it took to clean them.

kbbailey
April 4, 2011, 07:03 PM
I like the simple, low tech, old-timey, every shot is a reload, better do it right the first time, concept.
I like the fact that my ancestors did it this way.
I like the way bp challenges me to be a better hunter/marksman.
I like the fact that I built my rifle from a kit.
I like the home-made powder horns. measures, and loading blocks.
......But most of all, I like the people who appreciate, shoot, collect, compete, build, and hunt with bp firearms. It has been my experience that they are good honest people.

SleazyRider
April 4, 2011, 07:11 PM
Well said, Kbbailey, well said!

SleazyRider
April 4, 2011, 07:17 PM
All of the above, and the fact, that with my period scoped 45/70 trapdoor I can take out a fly at 500 paces !!! It's kind of a misuse of the ol' girl, but FUN as HELL !!!

Plus... NOBODY can partay like a bunch of BP nuts toting their flints, wearing their skins and coons, out on a hunting/camping excursion !!!

http://i1176.photobucket.com/albums/x330/ElvinWarrior/FR0664.jpg

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David, "EW"
Didn't get into flintlock yet, ElvinWarrior, but it's on my list of things to do before I die. So tell me, what kind of flintlock rifle is that in your post? Where should I begin? I already have a percussion rifle and revolver, so school me, please. (This ain't a thread hijack, merely a slight diversion!)

abendad
April 4, 2011, 07:24 PM
i really like the idea of only one shot. you have to make it count.

Mr_Pale_Horse
April 4, 2011, 07:46 PM
One shot, simple, focused, make it count.

Axel Larson
April 4, 2011, 07:55 PM
I like the flame that shoots out of the barrel along with the bullet.

Busyhands94
April 4, 2011, 08:12 PM
i love the muzzle flash too as well as that satisfying >THUD< and the smell reminds me of the 4th of July! it is so fun it almost feels like it is illegal in Kali. probably because a lot of fun things are. i seem to relate fun with illegal because i live in a state of regulatory crap.

gizmodog
April 4, 2011, 08:34 PM
history got me into B.P. ..........

nothing as good as that plume of good smelling smoke!

love the mail to your door & no paper work .

gizmodog

ElvinWarrior
April 5, 2011, 06:39 AM
The Rifle is a Tennesse short carbine, 50 Cal., Spainish make, available from DGW, Dixie Gun Works, for $465.00, new, and ALOT less if you buy here, used, in the trading section.

Basics of Flint... (I am asumbing you don't need the basics of BP muzzle Loaders in general.)

Don't scrimp on the flints, buy NICE ones, they are a bit more pricey, but well worth the extra little bit. I generally buy the "high end", German Agate, or French flints, they are harder, spark more profusely and more reliably, need less knapping and foolin around with, and last longer. Size the flint to the flintlock, generally, if buying used the prior owner will know that, and when buying new, the dealer will, they come in various sizes by width, starting at about 3/8" for small pocket pistols, all the way up to about a full inch. Pad the flint, with a small strip of flint leather. The flint hammer should be tightened to very snug, but not too darn tight, overtighening can crack and break the flints, and at around $5.95 to $11.95 each, I am sure you will want yours to last a while.

Pick up the special 4Fg super fine flintlock priming powder. Goex carries this, as does the Swiss make. The Swiss BP maker makes a high end super priming powder, super hot flash, very reliable, a bit more at around 27.00/lb for their premium pan powder, as opposed to the regular grains of 2F and 3F at around $15.00/lb.

Get a primer pan powder dispenser, they are really handy, and not alot of bux, several styles available, all under $20.00 a pop. I have found, the simple "push push" plain brass cylinder ones to be my preffered flash pan powder dispenser. Its very simple, fill the cylinder with 4Fg flash powder, push down on the nozzle in the base of the flash pan, a very small amount of power will be dispensed, close the frizzen, put the dispenser back in your pocket, You're Done !!!

The only thing that's really different about flint vs cap BP rifles, is the delay. Percussion caps go off immediately, there is no noticeable delay, at least not one us humans can detect with our slow nervous systems. But, with flints, there is a noticeable delay, or pause, between pulling the trigger, the hammer striking and showering sparks, the sparks falling down on the flash pan and igniting the flash powder, and the flame shooting through the touch hole to ignite the charge inside the breech. I am not sure, techincally what the actual delay is, but it is noticeable, so, you need to modify your shooting habits a bit, DON't relax right after the hammer falls, like you do with percussion guns.keep steady, keep holding the bead on the target, keep holding your breath, until the gun fires. It's a bit of a trick to get the timing down right, and to learn how to keep steady for a longer length of time, but, it's a skill you can master in a couple visits to the range, if you are diligent with it.

Other than that, absolutely everything else about flints is the same, same loads, same bullet grainage versus bore caliber, same patches, same everything.

Some people claim, that flints have a tad less power than percussion caps, because of the open touch hole in the breech. I am not so sure this is actually true, because, there is blowby with the caps as well. But, some guys think so, my advice to them is this, add in two or three more grains of powder, that should do it !!!

I love flints myself, I love building up affordable curio type flints from kits, great hobby that !!! And CHEAP too !!!. My only advice with flints with respect to price is, always go with major manufacturers, or manufacturers that are reputable and produce an accurate product. This is because of the geometry of the fllint ignition system. Poorly made, inexensive flint lock mechanisms are generally not correctly manufactured to the best geometry to produce a profussion of sparks, reliably. You can, of course, purchase a cheap used one, and just replace the flint mechanism with a much better one, this can be a home project if you have a modest home workshop, and modest hobbiest gun smithing skills, or, a good gumsmith and mount a new one, at not too steep a price, tis not to difficult to do.

Well, that's about it !!! I hope I answered your questions for you, and if you have more, just write back, I will be happy to offer any advice I have, and if I don't know something, I will just tell you that, I am a hobbyist, not a world class expert, I don't know it all, and I don't pretend to.

http://i1176.photobucket.com/albums/x330/ElvinWarrior/FlintSamplePics.jpg

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David, "EW"

ElvinWarrior
April 5, 2011, 06:50 AM
The Rifle is a Tennesse short carbine, 50 Cal., Spainish make, available from DGW, Dixie Gun Works, for $465.00, new, and ALOT less if you buy here, used, in the trading section.

I would suggest starting out with a good brand of Hawkin, either new, or a good condition used one, or a nice smooth barrel big bore, like a 69 Caliber, either pistol or reproduction military musket type. Kit guns are way fun too, and reduce the hit on the wallet a tad. These kinds of guns are not over pricey at all, and used, I have seen very nice, very well cared for, older Hawkin 40 or 50 Cal flintlocks at around $100.00. I suggest the Hawkin, because of it's versatility, it is a very adaptable and hardy rilfe, it can handle a very wide range and variety of loads, to match just about any use. I suggest the smooth bore, because of the same thing, you can fire a solid patched ball, or, load it with buck/bird shot, and have a nice little shotgun that can shoot both. With the big bore smooth bore pistol, you can load it with shot too, and you end up with a legal short barrel shotgun pistol !!! (Fun gun that !!! WAY FUN !!!) Smooth bores are not as nortoriously innaccurate as tradition has them, they are amazingly accurate at modest ranges.

Basics of Flint... (I am asumbing you don't need the basics of BP muzzle Loaders in general.)

Don't scrimp on the flints, buy NICE ones, they are a bit more pricey, but well worth the extra little bit. I generally buy the "high end", German Agate, or French flints, they are harder, spark more profusely and more reliably, need less knapping and foolin around with, and last longer. Size the flint to the flintlock, generally, if buying used the prior owner will know that, and when buying new, the dealer will, they come in various sizes by width, starting at about 3/8" for small pocket pistols, all the way up to about a full inch. Pad the flint, with a small strip of flint leather. The flint hammer should be tightened to very snug, but not too darn tight, overtighening can crack and break the flints, and at around $5.95 to $11.95 each, I am sure you will want yours to last a while.

Pick up the special 4Fg super fine flintlock priming powder. Goex carries this, as does the Swiss make. The Swiss BP maker makes a high end premium priming powder, super hot flash, very reliable, a bit more at around 27.00/lb for their premium pan powder, as opposed to the regular grains of 2F and 3F at around $15.00/lb, but well worth it.

Get a primer pan powder dispenser, they are really handy, and not alot of bux, several styles available, all under $20.00 a pop. I have found, the simple "push-push" plain brass cylinder ones to be my preffered flash pan powder dispenser. Its very simple, fill the cylinder with 4Fg flash powder, push down on the nozzle in the base of the flash pan, a very small amount of power will be dispensed, close the frizzen, put the dispenser back in your pocket, You're Done !!!

Pick up a flint pouch, a place to keep your flints, flinting tools, flint leather, et all, some flinting tools are combination tools, those are the least expensive, they will have the flint hammer screwdriver and a simple flint knapping tool, on one tool, or, you can just buy seperate ones. the flint pouches are small, inexpensive, and fit easily into you possibles bag.

The only thing that's really different about flint vs cap BP rifles, is the delay. Percussion caps go off immediately, there is no noticeable delay, at least not one us humans can detect with our slow nervous systems. But, with flints, there is a noticeable delay, or pause, between pulling the trigger, the hammer striking and showering sparks, the sparks falling down on the flash pan and igniting the flash powder, and the flame shooting through the touch hole to ignite the charge inside the breech. I am not sure, techincally, what the actual delay is, but it is noticeable, so, you need to modify your shooting habits a bit, DON't relax right after the hammer falls, like you do with percussion guns. Keep steady, keep holding the bead on the target, keep holding your breath, until the gun fires. It's a bit of a trick to get the timing down right, and to learn how to keep steady for a longer length of time, but, it's a skill you can master in a couple visits to the range, if you are diligent with it.

A little "trick" that some guys do, in an attempt to decrease the firing delay is to first pour down about 5Gr of the 4Fg priming powder down the barrel, swab the barrel with a dry patch to gather the fine grains into the bottom of the breech, then pour down the remainder of your charge, adusting the grainage of the charge by reducing it by 5 grains. The finer grained, priming powder ignites more quickly, the theory is that this will reduce the delay from trigger pull to load discharge. Whether or not this actually works, I really don't know, but it does make a degree of sense to me. I do this myself.

Other than that, absolutely everything else about flints is the same, same loads, same bullet grainage versus bore caliber, same patches, same everything.

Some people claim, that flints have a tad less power, a little bit less breech pressure, than percussion cap arms, because of the open touch hole in the breech. I am not so sure this is actually true, because, there is blowby with the caps as well. But, some guys think so, my advice to them is this, add in two or three more grains of powder, that should do it !!!

I love flints myself, I love building up affordable curio type flints from kits, great hobby that !!! And CHEAP too !!!. My only advice with flints with respect to price is, always go with major manufacturers, or manufacturers that are reputable and produce an accurate product. This is because of the geometry of the fllint ignition system. Poorly made, inexensive flint lock mechanisms are generally not correctly manufactured to the best geometry to produce a profussion of sparks, reliably. You can, of course, purchase a cheap used one, and just replace the flint mechanism with a much better one, this can be a home project if you have a modest home workshop, and modest hobbiest gun smithing skills, or, a good gumsmith can mount a new one, at not too steep a price, tis not too difficult to do. Just be sure to get a flintlock mechanism that is properly sized to your gun, Dixie is very good at matching things up like this.

Well, that's about it !!! I hope I answered your questions for you, and if you have more, just write back, I will be happy to offer any advice I have, and if I don't know something, I will just tell you that, I am a hobbyist, not a world class expert, I don't know it all, and I don't pretend to.

http://i1176.photobucket.com/albums/x330/ElvinWarrior/FlintSamplePics.jpg

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David, "EW"

StrawHat
April 5, 2011, 07:31 AM
ElvinWarrior,

If your flintlock is not giving faster ignition than a percussion lock you need to get it tuned. Or else you are using too much powder in the pan. A properly tuned flintlock will fire nearly instaneously. It should also fire when held upside down. Too much powder will cause it to burn like a fuse. You want the flash to be below the touch hole.

ElvinWarrior
April 5, 2011, 07:45 AM
Strawhat,

Really? OMG I didn't know that !!! I will certainly try that one out !!!

http://i1176.photobucket.com/albums/x330/ElvinWarrior/MacaulayCulkina.jpg

"OMG !!! Less Frizzen Powder Results In A Bigger FLASH ??? WHO KNEW ???"

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David, "EW"

rocklock
April 6, 2011, 11:57 PM
The smoke keeps the mosquitos down!

TheCracker
April 7, 2011, 12:26 AM
The biggest thing I like and the only reason I have one is for the extra 3 weeks of hunting it allows me.

Now that I have one it is pretty cool to feel like I'm shooting a cannon and having to wait for the smoke to clear yo see it there's a dead animal!

Bluehawk
April 7, 2011, 12:33 AM
I love BP for all the reasons stated plus the fact with homemade BP I can make my own model rocket motors for pennies instead of big dollars for the commercial ones!!!!

Busyhands94
April 7, 2011, 04:41 PM
i love how fun and messy it is, it is not real black powder without the mess that gets all over your cloths and hands! people like to complain about how their ammo is so dirty in their Glock, however if they tried BP they would know messy really means! lol

xXxplosive
April 7, 2011, 04:49 PM
Love hunting with flintlocks....mostly smoothbores although I do have a few really wonderful rifles. Gave up huntin' with centerfire cartridges back in '91.
.62 cal. to .75 ca. thats for me........


Tip: and make sure you Touch Hole is drilled out to 3/32".......for great ignition.

BlackPowderSmoke
April 8, 2011, 01:22 AM
Ya forgot to add "All of the above". :cool:

AJumbo
April 8, 2011, 09:52 PM
"Other"......The best thing about black powder is the quality of people I meet while burning it.

Foto Joe
April 9, 2011, 12:06 PM
Tundra tires and a flat spot, you've got yourself a wilderness shooting range. All you have to do is be able to afford the J-3 and the guns!!

I seem to have a LOT more descretionary income since I sold the airplane.

SleazyRider
April 9, 2011, 08:37 PM
The Rifle is a Tennesse short carbine, 50 Cal., Spainish make, available from DGW, Dixie Gun Works, for $465.00, new, and ALOT less if you buy here, used, in the trading section.

I would suggest starting out with a good brand of Hawkin, either new, or a good condition used one, or a nice smooth barrel big bore, like a 69 Caliber, either pistol or reproduction military musket type. Kit guns are way fun too, and reduce the hit on the wallet a tad. These kinds of guns are not over pricey at all, and used, I have seen very nice, very well cared for, older Hawkin 40 or 50 Cal flintlocks at around $100.00. I suggest the Hawkin, because of it's versatility, it is a very adaptable and hardy rilfe, it can handle a very wide range and variety of loads, to match just about any use. I suggest the smooth bore, because of the same thing, you can fire a solid patched ball, or, load it with buck/bird shot, and have a nice little shotgun that can shoot both. With the big bore smooth bore pistol, you can load it with shot too, and you end up with a legal short barrel shotgun pistol !!! (Fun gun that !!! WAY FUN !!!) Smooth bores are not as nortoriously innaccurate as tradition has them, they are amazingly accurate at modest ranges.

Basics of Flint... (I am asumbing you don't need the basics of BP muzzle Loaders in general.)

Don't scrimp on the flints, buy NICE ones, they are a bit more pricey, but well worth the extra little bit. I generally buy the "high end", German Agate, or French flints, they are harder, spark more profusely and more reliably, need less knapping and foolin around with, and last longer. Size the flint to the flintlock, generally, if buying used the prior owner will know that, and when buying new, the dealer will, they come in various sizes by width, starting at about 3/8" for small pocket pistols, all the way up to about a full inch. Pad the flint, with a small strip of flint leather. The flint hammer should be tightened to very snug, but not too darn tight, overtighening can crack and break the flints, and at around $5.95 to $11.95 each, I am sure you will want yours to last a while.

Pick up the special 4Fg super fine flintlock priming powder. Goex carries this, as does the Swiss make. The Swiss BP maker makes a high end premium priming powder, super hot flash, very reliable, a bit more at around 27.00/lb for their premium pan powder, as opposed to the regular grains of 2F and 3F at around $15.00/lb, but well worth it.

Get a primer pan powder dispenser, they are really handy, and not alot of bux, several styles available, all under $20.00 a pop. I have found, the simple "push-push" plain brass cylinder ones to be my preffered flash pan powder dispenser. Its very simple, fill the cylinder with 4Fg flash powder, push down on the nozzle in the base of the flash pan, a very small amount of power will be dispensed, close the frizzen, put the dispenser back in your pocket, You're Done !!!

Pick up a flint pouch, a place to keep your flints, flinting tools, flint leather, et all, some flinting tools are combination tools, those are the least expensive, they will have the flint hammer screwdriver and a simple flint knapping tool, on one tool, or, you can just buy seperate ones. the flint pouches are small, inexpensive, and fit easily into you possibles bag.

The only thing that's really different about flint vs cap BP rifles, is the delay. Percussion caps go off immediately, there is no noticeable delay, at least not one us humans can detect with our slow nervous systems. But, with flints, there is a noticeable delay, or pause, between pulling the trigger, the hammer striking and showering sparks, the sparks falling down on the flash pan and igniting the flash powder, and the flame shooting through the touch hole to ignite the charge inside the breech. I am not sure, techincally, what the actual delay is, but it is noticeable, so, you need to modify your shooting habits a bit, DON't relax right after the hammer falls, like you do with percussion guns. Keep steady, keep holding the bead on the target, keep holding your breath, until the gun fires. It's a bit of a trick to get the timing down right, and to learn how to keep steady for a longer length of time, but, it's a skill you can master in a couple visits to the range, if you are diligent with it.

A little "trick" that some guys do, in an attempt to decrease the firing delay is to first pour down about 5Gr of the 4Fg priming powder down the barrel, swab the barrel with a dry patch to gather the fine grains into the bottom of the breech, then pour down the remainder of your charge, adusting the grainage of the charge by reducing it by 5 grains. The finer grained, priming powder ignites more quickly, the theory is that this will reduce the delay from trigger pull to load discharge. Whether or not this actually works, I really don't know, but it does make a degree of sense to me. I do this myself.

Other than that, absolutely everything else about flints is the same, same loads, same bullet grainage versus bore caliber, same patches, same everything.

Some people claim, that flints have a tad less power, a little bit less breech pressure, than percussion cap arms, because of the open touch hole in the breech. I am not so sure this is actually true, because, there is blowby with the caps as well. But, some guys think so, my advice to them is this, add in two or three more grains of powder, that should do it !!!

I love flints myself, I love building up affordable curio type flints from kits, great hobby that !!! And CHEAP too !!!. My only advice with flints with respect to price is, always go with major manufacturers, or manufacturers that are reputable and produce an accurate product. This is because of the geometry of the fllint ignition system. Poorly made, inexensive flint lock mechanisms are generally not correctly manufactured to the best geometry to produce a profussion of sparks, reliably. You can, of course, purchase a cheap used one, and just replace the flint mechanism with a much better one, this can be a home project if you have a modest home workshop, and modest hobbiest gun smithing skills, or, a good gumsmith can mount a new one, at not too steep a price, tis not too difficult to do. Just be sure to get a flintlock mechanism that is properly sized to your gun, Dixie is very good at matching things up like this.

Well, that's about it !!! I hope I answered your questions for you, and if you have more, just write back, I will be happy to offer any advice I have, and if I don't know something, I will just tell you that, I am a hobbyist, not a world class expert, I don't know it all, and I don't pretend to.

http://i1176.photobucket.com/albums/x330/ElvinWarrior/FlintSamplePics.jpg

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David, "EW"
Thanks for taking the time to post that, ElvinWarrior! That's exactly what I need to know.

BullRunBear
April 9, 2011, 09:05 PM
So many good reasons stated above with an emphasis on the wonderful people who enjoy the hobby.

Another benefit from my point of view is that BP shooting, once you have the gun(s), is so inexpensive. Even at a reduced income in retirement my wife and I can shoot as much as we want by going mostly with 22s and BP.

Jeff

SleazyRider
April 10, 2011, 07:06 PM
Black Powder threads are less likely to get locked! (Hope I'm not jinxing this phenomenon.) Is it because BP shootists are more likely to be gentlemen? :D

ElvinWarrior
April 14, 2011, 09:17 AM
Sleazyrider...

Beware of older BP "Gentleman" who wear a velvet collared dinner jacket, a red paisely vest with a pocket chain, a plain dark felt wide brimmed hat, and plain white cotton trousers....

Those "Gentlemen", Drink, Cuss, Womanize and CHEAT at POKER !!!

LOL !!!

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David, "EW"

SleazyRider
April 14, 2011, 09:46 AM
Sleazyrider...

Beware of older BP "Gentleman" who wear a velvet collared dinner jacket, a red paisely vest with a pocket chain, a plain dark felt wide brimmed hat, and plain white cotton trousers....

Those "Gentlemen", Drink, Cuss, Womanize and CHEAT at POKER !!!

LOL !!!

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David, "EW"
Thanks fo' the heads-up, thar, ElvinWarrior. If I see such a varmint in these heah parts, I'll be sure 'n steer clear. If there's one thang I ain't got no use fer it's a feller who cheats at poker!

ZVP
April 15, 2011, 12:28 PM
For me the best part was just slowing down! I was burning up $50-70 worth of CF ammo in 20 minutes just pouring clop after clip through the guh. I didn't take time to enjoy handling the guns nor did I improve my shooting caue I just compensated for missed with anoter quick round. I started shooting single Actions to slow down and then went to BP and really found the joy of precise loading and measuring out my chambers.
I really enjoy the low recoil and the smoke sparks and smell.
I have had a hard time getting real BP where I live but substitutes are abundant. Transportation rules and storage laws are tough they tell me. Substitutes store like smokless powder and stores aer willing to do that. Even so I have a lot of fun with the substitutes!
None of the 36's and smaller 44's kick so that makes for good target images and hits.
I like the nostalga but the pratical side is the best for me!
To me just slowing down, handling and loading precisely are the best points to BP.
ZVP

Win1892
April 15, 2011, 06:47 PM
I shoot my Winchester cartridge rifles loaded with blackpowder.

Nothing like an original Winchester 1876, in 45-75, cutting loose with BP. Again, and again, and again.

ZVP
April 16, 2011, 04:09 PM
I'm hoping to go to the club and do some BP shooting and I thought of this thread and had to re-read it.
Since "discovering" BP shooting about a year and a 1/2 ago I have sure learned a lot! There is WAY more to learn too! For me, the whole experience from starting out and selecting my first BP Gun to the mundane tasks of buying the proper sized Balls, caps and Powder is all fun! Unlike rimfire shooting BP is a totally hands-on effort. You have control of nearly every stage and it affects the other tremondusly! Just changing Cap brands can wreck a day...
BP shooting is handloading at it's most basic. You controlevery stage and can alternate cylinder to cylinder in an instant, Unlike Smokless powder where you don't usually have a loading press on hand, with BP you can just adjust your powder measure to control velocity, recoil or range.
Each stage is an experiment either for consistancy or for a special one-off charge. You control it right there, right now!
You also get to spend aq lot of time handling your gun, and come on who dosen't like to play with their pistol? You do more handling in one session with a BP revolver than you do in six sessions with a semi-auto. All you do with a semi-auto is change clips and pull the trigger. Preparing the loads, shooting and the dreaded cleaning-up, you handle your gun constantly!
Speaking of clean-up,Black Powder requires more frequent teardowns during the shooting session which familarizes you more with the gun. Tnis is just one more plus as you become a Mechanic of sorts, reparing subtle problems from Cap jaqms and debris clearing. It makes an aneatur gunsmith of you more than any facet of the shooting concern! With BP there is much more to "HandlingA" than loading! Generally speaking Black Powder shooitng is the most hand's-on of ALL shooting sports
I have become so familliar with a Single Action that I have chosen to depend on my Ruger vaquero as my primary House and self defense gun! I have become so famailliar with the action that it was an obvious choice. Yes I am on the short side as far as the ammo supply is concerned,but one should NEVER depend on Pray and Spray as their usual shooting style! Aim to hit the first shot and firing a major caliber gun, you won't need 19 to be the winner of a situation.
This choice of action probablly wouldn't work for everyone but to me it makes the most sense. For me Muscle Memory is Single Action style and why not use every advantage that you have for a defensive situation? I get a lot of "ribbing" from friends for this philosophy but I don't suggest it for everyone.
Back to General Black Powder shooting, the combination of active participation and controll in all stages of the shot, and the knowlege one picks up about the hobby makes it a very exciting shooting style. you actively participate in everything!
Onthe fun side, BP gives the biggest "BOOM" for the amount of powder fired, and the smoke and fire just add to the excitement. So much goes on, and hands-on, you make it happen!
I gotta admit it's a dirty shooting hobby, and you do get a lot of it on you which makes the need for on-site clean-up materials. Windex has become a necessary stapel for me. It does everything from wiping shooting residue to general skin wipes.
I could go on for pages on the nicities related to Black Powder shooting! To me it's brought me closer to the basics of shooting and my Smokless endevors have benifitted from the understandings and habits learned. I'd suggest it to anyone!
ZVP

SleazyRider
April 22, 2011, 09:55 PM
Perhaps my favorite thing about black powder is that it makes it easy for my wife to shop for birthday presents for me without the hassle of permits and such. Ask me how I know!

(New owner of a Spiller and Burr!)

tazbigdog
April 23, 2011, 11:54 AM
For me, it gives me a sense of history, what our ancestors must have gone through in the early days of America.

burnse
June 8, 2011, 11:04 PM
Certainly "all of the above" is the only correct answer, though I must say that the thunder which eminates from the muzzle wakes something up - something deep inside, and makes me feel alive in a way I will never get from a modern firearm. The smell of powder is intoxicating. It almost gives me a high, and a need to crank back that hammer to let forth another beautiful cloud of smoke and all the fire and fury that an 1860 army can unleash upon anything in its path (I'm talking to you, watermelon).
There is no doubt that a black powder arm is certainly one of the few material things in this world that was created by man to do one thing, but makes the owner feel so much more than the satisfaction of ownership. They are truly beautiful.

Sorry, I'm a new member of the Holy Black Addict Club :D

Hocka Louis
June 8, 2011, 11:22 PM
The historic ARMS themselves, as well as the history of them...

pdosh
June 9, 2011, 12:22 AM
Wow, nobody mentioned the taste of BP. I used to do Civil War reenacting and we used pre rolled paper cartridges. You would tear the top off with your teeth and pour the powder down the barrel. We would usually fire 10-40 rounds. You are almost always going to get a taste.

But I also agree with all of the above. I haven't tried making my own BP but may try that too, just for the education.

alsask
June 9, 2011, 01:41 AM
The thing I like most about blackpowder shooting?

I like it when the condesending smarmy people who make snide remarks about flintlocks walk out to the targets and see the ragged hole the "old dummy with the musket" makes compared to their scoped centerfire rifles!

My grandson was with me one day and quite intrigued with rifle the guy next to us was setting up. Fluted bull barrel ect, ect.

After shooting a string we walked out to the targets and he had the audacity to ask [loud enough for Mr. Hair Gel to hear] why the other guys groups were so big?:)

ofitg
June 9, 2011, 02:31 AM
"Other"....

Spent a couple years of my life in one of those "tropical paradises" where only the police and military are allowed to have guns. I don't know if it will ever come to that in the United States... but if I only have a percussion revolver, a bullet mould and a Tap-O-Cap, I will be armed and loaded.

I'm not saying that I would choose a '58 Remmie over a M1911A1, but I would certainly choose a '58 Remmie over any weapon that doesn't go BANG.

StrawHat
June 9, 2011, 07:24 AM
Someone posted about a trapdoor with a scope, can we get a picture of that one?

robhof
June 9, 2011, 07:53 AM
The thrill of shooting game with primitive style weapons, especially that 1st deer. Shot rabbits and squirrel with kit pistol as a teen, but just recently got my 1st deer with B/p; oh, what a thrill!!! Especially after 40 years of on and off b/p shooting.

Mike OTDP
June 9, 2011, 10:22 AM
Because, with all due humility, I shoot them pretty well. At least the pistols. Challenging, but very rewarding.

And it's entertaining to shoot a group that I condider fair to poor - and have the people shooting cartridge guns looking at it and marveling at how "good" it is.

Pyro
June 9, 2011, 04:14 PM
It's like having a gun with the reloading equipment already attached to it.
Knowing that your responsible for every aspect of your revolver performing correctly to spit a chunk of metal off somewhere and hit a target.

Chuck Dye
June 9, 2011, 07:37 PM
Treasured memory:

A ten year old shooting buddy, returning home after a day of shooting, running to Mom hollering "Mom! Mom! I shot the .44! I shot the .44!" We had loaded an 1858 Remington replica with about 15 grain charges that barely lifted the barrel off the sand bag.

4v50 Gary
June 9, 2011, 09:02 PM
I've played with belt fed & full automatic weapons, but black powder is one of the most gratifying type of guns to shoot.

YumaKid
June 10, 2011, 12:35 AM
Put me down as another "all of the above"; as well as agreeing with ZVP on the need to SLOW DOWN! Learned to shoot handguns with DA revolvers, mostly K-frame S&W's; and the desire to "race gun" them took ahold of me. Never fell all the way down to the dreaded "spray and pray" attitude, but I could dump empties, stab in a Comp III and be back bangin' away in less than a blink!

Had to have an N-frame; and what's the 'natural' N-frame calibre for a kid that grew up in the 60's-70's? Yup. First time I slipped a .44 Win Mag round in with the Specials; the front sight took a chunk of skin out of my forehead before my mind registered the BANG! :eek: This punk did NOT "feel lucky".
Weaver stance with that sucker ever since, even with .44Spcl Silvertips.

And it gave me a terrible "flinch". Can't even drop the hammer on a .22 cal Single-Six without a slight twinge.

Doesn't happen with 30 gr of Pyrodex behind a .451-.454 round ball - even in the "little" 5-1/2" Remmie. The swinging targets seem to indicate that the ball from a Remington will hit with the same authority at "street combat" distances as a standard load .44Mag; but the barrel crown doesn't come rushing towards my face with alacrity (or at all). The perceived recoil is lower, but I'd be hard-pressed to believe that the swinging steel notices the difference. And I'm getting better. Might be "psicko-logical" or whatever, but I'm calmer and the groups are tightening up.

The pressure is off. The fun is back. Haven't shot the 629 in over a year, about the time I started ramming powder, wad and lead. Coincidence? :D

Mac2
June 10, 2011, 01:15 AM
Mine is my Dad introducing me to shooting in 1972 (I was 9) with a 1851 Navy. I got so hooked by the time I was 11 I bought him his first BP rifle, a .45 Kentuckian, with my paper route money, for Christmas in '74. Loved it so much I bought my own, just like his, the next week. I have always loved the nostalgia of the past. It was a much more simple, yet hard life. The smell is icing on the cake, I've never used anything but Goex.
My Dad passed Christmas day 2010. I have his and mine combined now, and continue to shoot them as a hobby, and in his memory. Miss 'ya Dad...

Foto Joe
June 10, 2011, 10:04 AM
My dad never knew the pleasure of Black Powder shooting, but he did hand me his own 22 short rifle that he had purchased in the 30's when I was about 6 or 7. That started a life long journey which included over a decade of competition shotgunning. The competitive shooting is now over a decade behind me and my wife bought me a "Fake" '51 for Christmas a few years ago and it's been a growing addiction ever since.

I know Dad would have loved the sickness we all now share but he never got the chance. I still have that 22 short rifle from "Monkey Wards" along with his Mossberg "22 Bunnie Gun" and my grandfathers Remmington 1912 22 pump which I remember Grandpa telling me that he paid I believe about $5 for in 1913 or so.

It may not be a parent who passes on the Black Powder passion, but more than likely it was a parent who taught you to shoot your first gun. For those that are still alive they surely have a pride in watching their children enjoy something that they passed along (I know I do). For those who have passed along, I know they smile down on use every time we pull the trigger and get a whiff of sulphur.

AKElroy
June 10, 2011, 10:06 AM
OTHER. It chases the misquitos away.

steelbird
June 11, 2011, 04:29 PM
I love the smell of black powder in the morning.

Smells like history.

Benmathes
June 13, 2011, 08:05 PM
I have it on good authority that the Almighty hunts with black powder-

good enuf for me

SleazyRider
June 13, 2011, 08:07 PM
Pray tell, exactly, what does He hunt?

SwampMouse
June 13, 2011, 09:18 PM
Pray tell, exactly, what does He hunt?
Anything he wants.

mr.trooper
June 14, 2011, 01:38 AM
I like that I can buy my BP substitute at big box stores, and then use it for anything.

With just a canister of Pyrodex 'P' and a set of dippers I can target shoot with my dueling pistol, hunt small and medium game with my cap lock pistols, make shotgun shells for birds and clay games, and load a cap & ball for defense.

The versatility is amazing.

Dellbert
June 14, 2011, 11:03 AM
I like it because of all the above, and the people that I meet that enjoy it and the history, and not letting the past die. Plus I really think it is cleaner than any BP substitutes. Goax is ok but I like Swiss BP more than the others, when I can get it. Dellbert

StrawHat
June 15, 2011, 07:14 AM
Elvin Warrior,

I am rather intrigued by your mention of the scoped trapdoor, in reply #23,

All of the above, and the fact, that with my period scoped 45/70 trapdoor

Can we see a picture?

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