J-frame Technique Advice - Wrist Control


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OldOM
April 5, 2011, 09:25 PM
Hello -- I've been shooting semi-automatic handguns for several years, but am new to the very heavy trigger of the j-frame. I've noticed that my wrist breaks upward right around the time the j-frame trigger breaks - near the end of it's travel, but prior to firing the shot. It breaks a tiny amount -- but of course, this has a significant impact at 10 yards. Any thoughts on technique to minimize this upward wrist break? (Of course, I can workout more with weights and grip-strengtheners ; but, I figure that there must also be some technique to help master this wrist break).

Right now, I can put all 5 shots on an 8x10 sheet of paper, at 10 yards, using very controlled slow fire -- but would like to shoot faster with better accuracy.

Long winded question -- Thanks in advance for any insights or advice.

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Guillermo
April 6, 2011, 09:15 AM
sounds like you are putting too much finger into the guard.

first joint only and I bet you do a lot better.

sounds like you need a trigger job too

Red Cent
April 6, 2011, 10:01 AM
Grips. I have used the 1911 forever and recently started to compete in PCCA. I found that when I came out of the holster I would be looking at the whole front sight above the rear sight. M60-10.
At my age I had no interest in processing the subconscious so I made some cheap grips. Notice there is almost an additionl 2"s of grip at the web of the hand.

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/Handguns/SmithWessonM60-10002.jpg

These grips require the revolver to rotate forward when you make the draw. I have made another pair from walnut but no pictures yet.

I have a large hand. I can reach about nine inches from the tip of my thumb to the tip of the ring finger. My thumb and my little finger will create a straight line.

OldOM
April 6, 2011, 10:36 AM
thanks for the feedback. I'll continue to work on wrist strength and try finger placement changes.

Red Cent -- your grips made me chuckle. (I currently have some tape around my grips - not pretty but functional).

Thicker grips might be the solution --- The Pachmayr Compacs have helped a lot. I'm tempted to try the Crimson trace LG-305 (but I don't know if they're thicker than my current grips, and the price is a barrier).

The j-frame might not be for me, with my large hands. But, I don't want to give up on the challenge, so I'll keep working it until I get better.

Thanks

Remllez
April 6, 2011, 06:50 PM
I tend to agree that bigger grips are worth a try but I'm thinking it's more a matter of finger strength than anything else. Dry firing the snot out of that J-frame will get you there. A lot of people clamp down with all their fingers at the very end of the stroke because their trigger finger can't quite pull through all the way.

Once you build up that finger and the muscles on the top of your wrist you will notice that muscle in your wrist will be the only thing moving when you stroke through the trigger.
At first it will seem difficult but keep dry firing...don't just hold it at the ground pick out something and practice holding the gun like you are shooting at something and when your wrist and finger are ready to quit really bear down and pull through another 20 or so times.

That's the key to building those muscles up...going past the point you feel you are done and can't do it anymore. It takes time to learn double action shooting but it pays off in spades.

Notoast
April 6, 2011, 07:25 PM
With my semiauto pistol, I use the pad of my finger on the trigger. When shooting a DA revolver, I put the crease of my first knuckle on the trigger. With the pistol you usually practice pulling in the "take up" and then pulling to break. With the revolver, you want to try to make it a continuous smooth pull.

Try balancing a coin on top of your revolver barrel and practicing dry fire.

Wolfeye
April 6, 2011, 08:31 PM
Try balancing a coin on top of your revolver barrel and practicing dry fire.

I recommend this also. I do it while using quality snap caps. It builds finger strength, improves trigger control, and (in the case of my Ruger) helps smooth out a new trigger action.

I too have large hands, and the Compacs are the best compromise I've found for concealable size vs. comfort.

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