Reloading book to buy next? New to reloading questions :)


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O.T. Powell
April 6, 2011, 02:11 AM
I just ordered my equipment. Spent around $700 dollar for everythiexpectant for primers, case trimmer, and flashhole cleaner and pocket primer cleaner. I have ABC's for reloading and metallic cartridge reloading. I am looking to buy a 3rd book. Should I buy modern reloading by that lee guy or should I buy the Lyman manual? Also if anyone can recommend and good accurate powders for 30-06 and 45 ACP.. I ordered H4350 and P38. Looking to buy imr4064 next for 30-06 and reloader 19.. As for 45acp I dunno what I should try after p38. Shooting 168gr in 30-06 and 185gr in 45acp. I have on my wish list cci200 primers and cci300 primers... I read that some people use magnum primers, why would anyone need to use magnum primers for a non magnum?

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Kachok
April 6, 2011, 02:19 AM
Buy the Nosler #6 manual good stuff :) I like it because they give modern pressure loads for older calibers such as my 6.5x55, they will list a disclamer if it is not suitable for old rifles. Horandy and all the others I looked at will only list loads suitable for the old rifles. Besides Nosler has some of the best bullets out there IMHO you could hunt the rest of you life with just Ballistic Tips and Accubonds and not be missing anything, and they are very accurate in every rifle I have loaded them for.

cfullgraf
April 6, 2011, 08:34 AM
The major bullet manufacturers and powder manufacturers/distributers have loading data for their products. If you have determined which bullets and powders you are going to use, the manufacturer's manual would be a good place to start.

Many of the powder manufacturers/distributers have web sites with loading information. They also have print material in various forms from books to magazines to pamphlets.

Lyman #49 has a bit more generic information. Lots of folks recommend it.

Having a number of loading manuals is good. The books have good extra information and while the general information is the same, each has some golden nuggets of information not found in the other manuals.

I have a bookcase full of loading manuals. I have several editions from Speer, Hornady, Lyman and Sierra. I buy the Hodgdon reloading magazine every year.

Hope this helps.

loadedround
April 6, 2011, 08:45 AM
I would recommend both the Lyman and the Speer reloading manuals. The Nosler and the Hornady manuals are also both quite good. Each manual will cover certain specific areas of interest. I would go for the Lyman manual if limited to just one. Check the "net" for some of the newer "used" ones to save a few bucks .:)

2 Wild Dueces
April 6, 2011, 09:39 AM
IMO....The best explanation of interior ballistics and reloading techniques is found in the HORNADY MANUAL. Reading, re-reading, and understanding those first chapters is fundamental for shooters / reloaders.

2 Wild Dueces
April 6, 2011, 09:47 AM
I have on my wish list cci200 primers and cci300 primers... I read that some people use magnum primers, why would anyone need to use magnum primers for a non magnum?


Some people will use magnum primers in very cold climates to get better ignition....and also to help ignite slower-burning "magnum" powders. (I dont use 'em much myself.) Also, I used to try a variety of primer brands when starting to re-load. Never found much variation (if any) in accuracy from doing so. As Winchester primers worked with the Lee hand-held tools and were readily available most everywhere.....those became almost exclusive for my needs. This may be different depending on where you live...etc, but I would stay with one brand of primers and call it a day.

TooManyToys
April 6, 2011, 10:16 AM
+ 1 for the Lyman reloading book.
You mentioned the Lee book, that one is worth having too. It has good reading & information not found elsewhere.

Smaug
April 6, 2011, 02:22 PM
Get the Lyman book. The load data in the Lee book is just compiled from all the free data the powder manufacturers put out. There is a nice history of each round in the Lyman book, and the loads are also more varied than in the Lee.

As others have said, Modern Reloading is also a good book, but very Lee-biased. For instance, it has data on which dipper gives which amount of each powder. Only Lee makes dippers, that I know of, and I think they're great. The whole front part of the book is all about Lee equipment in general. The Lyman book, in contrast, has info that will work for ALL brands of equipment.

FWIW, I have nothing against Lee. I started with RCBS, but switched to Lee. I just like their stuff better. I don't feel like I got raped every time I pay for something. The quality is there too. I just built a jig for my Challenger Breech Lock press so I can mount it in the woodworking vise and not drill holes in the bench. I like that the dipper, shellholder, and load sheet is included with the Lee dies too.

As for accurate .45 ACP loads, I've tried Unique, Bullseye, and HP38 so far, and Bullseye seems to be the most accurate. But HP38 is more flexible with other handgun calibers, so I buy that now.

I don't have a 30-06, but IMR 4350 has treated me well for 6mm Remington.

Oh, that reminds me: another thing about the Lyman book is that they often tell you which powder was the most accurate in their testing.

eam3clm@att.net
April 6, 2011, 10:41 PM
My suggestion would also be the lyman 49th. It is full of info for the beginner. the lee is also good for load data but doesnt list a certin bullet only lead,jacket,plated. as others said after you find out what bullet you plan to use buy a manual of that company. I will reccomend aginst the "LOAD BOOKS" that come in the sprial bound as I have found that some of their date is outdated and only lists load data.

Twiki357
April 7, 2011, 02:42 AM
I use the Lyman #49 manual. The manufactures manuals are good for their own products, but I have found them wanting when you use a different bullet/powder than what they offer.

dmazur
April 7, 2011, 11:20 AM
why would anyone need to use magnum primers for a non magnum?

My understanding of this is that the two are not related, even though that might seem perfectly reasonable.

The primer's "brisance" is stronger with magnum primers, and this may be necessary to ignite slow-burning powders. The reloading manuals often show magnum primers for certain powders, standard primers for others, for the same cartridge. An example I am a little familiar with is .44 Rem Magnum and H110 powder. Magnum primers are recommended.

Many reloaders ignore the recommendation (and use standard primers with H110) and have OK results, but in colder temperatures the differences may be more apparent.

Someone else might have a better explanation, but I believe the above is correct.

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