Drink Tea while you shoot?


PDA






Flashpoint
January 10, 2004, 01:28 PM
I had noticed that when I was sitting around dry-firing I tend to be more comfortable holding my pistolas with a Teacup hold rather than the more traditional one I was shown. So I thought I wonder how this would translate into actual shooting, and darn if it didn't increase my accuracy. Are there any on else that prefers to shoot this way or am I the freak?

If you enjoyed reading about "Drink Tea while you shoot?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
P95Carry
January 10, 2004, 01:33 PM
So far - I am struggling to get a clear mental pic of this!!:p

Any chance of a photo .. it would help!

Badger Arms
January 10, 2004, 01:52 PM
It helps if you chop your pinky finger completely off! Seriously, when shooting slow-fire legs, I often use only my middle finger and thumb to grasp the pistol grip on a RIFLE and then my trigger finger is free. With less fingers, there is less to disturb the rifle. With a pistol, it's a different story. It's a bad habit to get into, in my opinion, to have any less than all of your fingers engaged. It might be perfectly fine for you, though. Have you considered taping your pinky and ring finger together? Might sound absurd, but I did that once and it seemed to improve my slow-fire scores.

George Hill
January 10, 2004, 01:53 PM
:scrutiny:
Your kidding right?

Mal H
January 10, 2004, 02:35 PM
I'm with Chris on this, I don't see what you mean. I hold a coffee cup with both hands right now (it's currently about 11 deg outside), and I might have had tea out of a cup once in my life, but I don't remember it. :)

The hold I think you're describing doesn't sound very secure to me.


Badger Arms -- It helps if you chop your pinky finger completely off! ... Might sound absurd, but I did that once and it seemed to improve my slow-fire scores. I guess you did do it only once! You could only do it twice at most. :D
(Yes, I know what you mean, but it sounded funny.)

stans
January 10, 2004, 03:21 PM
This could quickly degenerate into a "real men don't..." thread.:neener:

cratz2
January 10, 2004, 03:32 PM
When I think of a 'teacup hold' anything, I envision one holding one's pinky finger upright... in a manner many straight guys not 100% secure with themselves might not be too eager to do in front of other guys once said other guys pointed it out...

:p

hksw
January 10, 2004, 03:39 PM
Maybe Flashpoint means holding with the weak hand under the shooting hand and gun 'cupping' them instead of the regular hand over fingers in the front.

horge
January 10, 2004, 06:46 PM
Originally posted by hksw
Maybe Flashpoint means holding with the weak hand under the shooting hand and gun 'cupping' them instead of the regular hand over fingers in the front.

That's what I understood as well.
Maybe Flash will chime in again and clarify.

Badger Arms
January 10, 2004, 08:56 PM
I just assumed he meant with the little pinkey sticking up in the air in that froofy way. I've taped up my fingers to keep them from throwing the gun off.

P95Carry
January 10, 2004, 09:04 PM
Flashpoint ... come on dude .. we need some clarification still ...... :p

George Hill
January 10, 2004, 09:07 PM
I bet he eats quiche too.

Standing Wolf
January 10, 2004, 09:25 PM
Maybe Flashpoint means holding with the weak hand under the shooting hand and gun 'cupping' them instead of the regular hand over fingers in the front.

I hope that's what he meant. That's actually not a bad way to hold a gun, especially if you're accustomed to the single-handed bullseye method. I had the devil's own time trying to hang onto a gun with both hands during my C.C.W. course: it just felt completely weird to try to use both hands. Still does.

Preacherman
January 10, 2004, 10:22 PM
Real men don't use teabags...

:neener: :p :D

Flashpoint
January 11, 2004, 02:30 AM
Sorry guys didn't mean to leave ya hangin'.

Maybe Flashpoint means holding with the weak hand under the shooting hand and gun 'cupping' them instead of the regular hand over fingers in the front.

Yep that's it, I made you some visual examples to help clarify the subject.
I just thought that that is what you call that kind of grip, I don't know where I picked that up from. Is there an actual name for the below pictured gip?

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-4/148376/g1.JPG http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-4/148376/g2.JPG

I'll have to admit you guys had me a little confused with the pinky thing, especially the chop it off comment, and no I've never ate quiche. Isn't that like a weird cake?

One thing that I failed to mention, doing this way really made me take notice in the difference in recoil of my Steyr M40 and my Sig p239 9mm(pictured above) The M40 seemed real mild while it made the 9mm feel more snappy, but not painful, just quick. Maybe it's just the difference in the two types of guns.

Feanaro
January 11, 2004, 05:18 AM
A rich unsweetened custard pie, often containing ingredients such as vegetables, cheese, or seafood.

That is Quiche.

And why exactly do you call it a "teacup" hold?

stans
January 11, 2004, 09:39 AM
I wouldn't exactly call that a "tea cup" hold. That looks more like a compromise between a two hand hold placing both hands parallel to the bore and the two hand hold in which the palm of the off hand is supporting the shooting hand. If this hold works well for you, then use it!!!!

riverdog
January 11, 2004, 10:52 AM
I bet he eats quiche too. I eat quiche. But then I'm a straight guy who is 100% secure. What's your point? :p

P95Carry
January 11, 2004, 11:28 AM
Much clearer now Flashpoint..... but I really would drop the ''tea cup'' aspect!!:p

I would call this ''weak hand cupping'' .. and have tried it with small frames ..... works for some, but despite quite large hands my grip is as ever .... when 2 handed ..... weak wrapped over strong.

Maddock
January 11, 2004, 12:01 PM
Real men don't use teabags...
But the loose leaves are such a pain!

berettaman
January 11, 2004, 12:17 PM
I was told that was the cup and saucer hold,used mainly by double action revolver users.

Oh yea:
Real men don't drink tea,it's coffee,cowboy style.
4 parts water,2 parts coffee boiled for ten minutes and strained thru your hat.:neener:

Badger Arms
January 11, 2004, 03:53 PM
That's how I hold my pistol. Nothing wrong with it. One-Handed I'm a little better, but combat stances are best done with two hands.

George Hill
January 11, 2004, 05:18 PM
My point?:scrutiny:
I bet you have more pairs of shoes than I do...





:neener:
Okay... that line of jokes has gone too far. I'm stopping now.

I've never heard of that grip as a Tea Cup grip.

Flashpoint
January 11, 2004, 06:35 PM
And why exactly do you call it a "teacup" hold?

I don't know why, it seams like I heard it called that once. I wouldn't make something like that up, I usually make other stuff up:evil:.

That looks more like a compromise between a two hand hold placing both hands parallel to the bore and the two hand hold in which the palm of the off hand is supporting the shooting hand.

It looks less like a compromise with the M40, it has a bit larger frame so I hold it a bit different.

And why exactly do you call it a "teacup" hold?

The only thing I can think of is because the weak hand holds the strong kinda like like a teacup, I guess.

riverdog
January 11, 2004, 06:46 PM
I bet you have more pairs of shoes than I do... Two pair of running shoes, three pair of hiking boots, two pair of work boots and one pair of wing tips that I haven't worn in years. Your turn ;)

Ankeny
January 11, 2004, 06:50 PM
Yeppers, that's the old cup and saucer grip. Don't see it much anymore because it really doesn't offer much. The purpose of a two hand grip is to maximize the friction between the pistol and the hands, and to minimize torque during recoil. The cup and saucer grip does neither, but hey, if you like it go for it...

mod12
January 11, 2004, 06:56 PM
i usually hold my teacup with my strong hand and support it with my quiche hand!.............aw, forget it. :)

larryw
January 11, 2004, 07:21 PM
What the heck's wrong with quiche (scrambled egg/cheese/ham/mushroom/pepper/spinach/etc. omelet in a pie crust so you can eat it pizza-style)? I like it, and if you don't, I'll take yours. :neener:

raz-0
January 11, 2004, 09:26 PM
the other problem with teacup/cup and saucer type holds are that on some guns they can cause jams because you can cause the magazine to move up past where it is intended to be.

Flashpoint
January 12, 2004, 12:26 AM
the other problem with teacup/cup and saucer type holds are that on some guns they can cause jams because you can cause the magazine to move up past where it is intended to be.

I could see that happening if you hand where kinda small or the grip was big. I'll have to experment with that.

Mike Irwin
January 12, 2004, 02:00 AM
The question is...

How do you hold your crumpets?

sm
January 12, 2004, 02:12 AM
Mike I'd say something about Lil Miss Tuffet,...and I'm glad it wasn't about coffee being "saucer'd and blowed"...

No I do hold my pistol that way . I have "cupped" my hand under lady students hand/butt of firearm to help steady in dry fire with a revolver to help steady as she 'walks the dime". Dryfire a semi " one dime at a time" I do this in live fire.( revo or semi) I will have student hold gun, align sights and I pull trigger...all part of teaching.

I don't do quiche...I do make one helluva of an omlet tho'...

Preacherman
January 12, 2004, 11:08 AM
Oh, Lordy, Lordy... Steve, that's too much! How on earth do you take an "omelette hold" on your pistol???

:what: :p :D :D :D

mod12
January 12, 2004, 12:53 PM
preacherman, that's the eggciting part! don't you know anything?:D

squibload
January 12, 2004, 01:07 PM
How on earth do you take an "omelette hold" on your pistol???

You guys are cracking me up...but let's stop all the yolking and get back to the cup-and-saucer debate....

Correia
January 12, 2004, 02:54 PM
I like quiche. Half a million calories from butter, sausage, eggs, sausage, cheese, sausage and sausage, in a crust made out of butter, lard, and some sort of material to hold it together (possibly sausage?). How can that possibly be a bad thing? :D

I have to go now. My left arm really hurts.


:p

mod12
January 12, 2004, 03:45 PM
that's from shooting with your weak hand!:D

Lone Star
January 12, 2004, 09:24 PM
I hold my guns and my teacups without prominent "pinky" action!

And, I do like tea!

My favorite brands are Twining's and Taylor's of Harrogate, in north Yorkshire. The first is widely sold in the US. The second, I get at Central Market stores in Texas, sort of gourmet grocery stores.

Try their sites. Twining's, in particular, has wonderful detail, including the history of the tea trade. (That firm has been around in London since 1706!)

www.twinings.com

www.yorkshiretea.co.uk

Hint: I find Twining's regular Darjeeling blend a little ephemeral, sort of the Coors of tea, and prefer the Darjeelings from Taylor's or Bigelow's, which is a US company. Their blenders go for a fuller flavor.

I suspect that my favorite tea of all is Twining's Ceylon Breakfast, or the estate-specific Ceylon teas from Taylor's, which aren't in bags; you have to use the loose leaves and strain. (Taylor's regular Ceylon blend is offered in bags.) But I also love a good Assam tea, which you can get from Twining's as Irish Breakfast. Taylor's just labels their's as region-specific: Assam. (Although both Assam and Darjeeling are in NE India, the teas are quite different.)

Taylor's better teas are named after the region of production, but their house blend, Yorkshire Gold, is also superb. So is their English Breakfast, which seems to have more Ceylon teas in the blend than does the equivalent from Twining's, which has a little "maltier" flavor.

My son stopped off in London on his way home from Iraq last year, and bought me a box of No. 14 English Breakfast at Harrod's, the famed dept. store. It reminded me a lot of Taylor's English Breakfast.

There's nothing wrong or effeminate about drinking tea. Probably every man who ever won the Victoria Cross drank tea! As did Jim Corbett, John Hunter, and other famous hunters of dangerous game in Africa and India.

Sometimes, I use milk, sometimes not. Good tea is delicious. Forget the bland stuff from Lipton, and try the above. I probably should have said more about Bigelow's, which offers good blends, although in general, I prefer the British brands.

Finally, Central Market is also selling a new American (Texan!) brand, The Original Ceylon Tea Company. Their English Breakfast Tea is as good as what the Brits blend! www.ceylon-tea.com As the name infers, they use all Ceylon teas.

Lone Star

larryw
January 12, 2004, 10:05 PM
Call me lucky! I come home to find my beautiful wife is making me a very yummy dinner: she's either reading this thread or can read my mind. Here's a picture of what's leftover from dinner. I'll be thinking about you during tomorrow's lunch.

http://www.dimark.com/shooting/dinner.jpg

Know a good cardiologist, Correia?

Flashpoint
January 12, 2004, 10:29 PM
Please forgive me for what I have done.:rolleyes: :D
































larryw

PM the recipe


:D

larryw
January 12, 2004, 10:48 PM
Sure, start with one gorgeous wife who knows how to cook...

You're on your own from there on out. :D

Mal H
January 12, 2004, 11:07 PM
Since this is turnng into a cooking thread, not that there's anything wrong with that, I think it has run its course. Besides it's making me hungry. :)

If you enjoyed reading about "Drink Tea while you shoot?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!