Guns from the attic


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Norton Commando
April 16, 2011, 06:41 PM
Anyone recognize these?

http://i245.photobucket.com/albums/gg59/jason_curtiss/DSCN0122.jpg

Jason

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GCBurner
April 16, 2011, 07:05 PM
I've seen a few of the Hammond .44RF "Bulldog" derringers around, but I'm not familiar with the flintlock. Is that a brass barrel?

Busyhands94
April 16, 2011, 07:07 PM
looks like a brass barrel! and i love that derringer, looks really old and really cool! something a cowboy or a cowgirl would carry as a backup! lol

GCBurner
April 16, 2011, 07:24 PM
The Connecticut Arms Hammond Bulldog was pretty popular, in its day. It came out in 1866, and was chambered to shoot the .44 Henry Rimfire, like the Henry Rifle, or the .44 Rimfire Short. Loaded with the .44 Henry, it had some real authority in its single shot, and was considerably more powerful than the .22, .32, or .41 Rimfire cartriges a lot of other derringer makers used.

GCBurner
April 16, 2011, 07:35 PM
Here's a similar flintlock, dating to the War of 1812 period:
http://www.ambroseantiques.com/fpistols/redfern.htm

Norton Commando
April 16, 2011, 07:36 PM
GCBurner - thanks for the identification!

A Connecticut Arms Hammond Bulldog, how did you figure that out so quickly? That certainly makes sense because these guns came from my Uncle who lived in the Connecticut / Main area.

Jason

george d dennis
April 16, 2011, 07:49 PM
type in a search, alot of information. the company was near hartford connecticut.
it didnt last long. think i read mortgage problems.

GCBurner
April 16, 2011, 08:03 PM
GCBurner - thanks for the identification!

A Connecticut Arms Hammond Bulldog, how did you figure that out so quickly? That certainly makes sense because these guns came from my Uncle who lived in the Connecticut / Main area.

Jason
I recognized the Hammond Bulldog right away from a friend's derringer collection; he had three or four of them. From the 1860s to the 1880s, they made thousands of them. I've always had an interest in 19th Century arms, it was such a prolific period for gun designs and innovations.

Norton Commando
April 16, 2011, 08:29 PM
Thanks for the information guys. If you don't mind, I'll ask y'all to help me identify more attic guns tomorrow.

Jason

Jaymo
April 17, 2011, 02:14 AM
Guns from the Attic. Wasn't that an Aerosmith album? No, that's right, it was Toys in the Attic. I like my version better.
Nice. Can't wait to see the rest of your attic guns.
I bet that little .44 Derringer packs a punch on both ends, firing the .44 Henry round.

DrLaw
April 17, 2011, 08:48 AM
Can you get a closer picture of the name on the lock of the flinter? It has a definite martial look to it, and the brass barrel would suggest sea service.

If it is marked Richmond, then chances are the hammer is a replacement since most Richmonds are supposed to have a double necked hammer.

Richmond was an armory established by the State of Virginia to make guns for the State militia. Their pistols are smoothbore, about ten in in length barrels, with the brass fittings.

More information about Richmonds can be found int the book Untied States Martial Pistols & Revolvers by Arcadi Gluckman.

The Doc is out now. :cool:

Norton Commando
April 17, 2011, 09:18 AM
Ok, here are some more pictures of the flintlock pistol:

http://i245.photobucket.com/albums/gg59/jason_curtiss/DSCN0132.jpg

http://i245.photobucket.com/albums/gg59/jason_curtiss/DSCN0130.jpg

http://i245.photobucket.com/albums/gg59/jason_curtiss/DSCN0131.jpg

The lock has what appears to be "Richards" on the side of it. The letter 'R' shows up on the barrel, which is straddled by two crowns with crossed staffs below them.

DrLaw
April 17, 2011, 12:02 PM
Okay, not Richmond. This one will be English, from Richards, I believe in London (some help here folks).

Brass would still indicate a sea service or customs pistol.

And the proof marks are Royal Armory.

The Doc is out now. :cool:

BHP FAN
April 18, 2011, 03:57 AM
Aye, Sea Service.

DrLaw
April 18, 2011, 08:01 AM
There were at least three Richards making guns in England, all with the letter 'T' starting their names. Thomas, Theodore and T., Two were from London, one was from Birmingham.

The Doc is out now. :cool:

gifford
April 18, 2011, 08:58 AM
Norton C - Thanks for posting. Nice group of old firearms.

sportclay
April 18, 2011, 10:04 AM
The proofs are English and Birmingham to be specific. This mark, the crossed scepters w/ crown in one form or another, sometimes with letters is the mark of the Birmingham proof house. Used between 1812 and 1914(I think 1914 was the last date) The "R" usually indicates a reproof. There may be more marks on the barrel below the wood and might provide more definitive info. The pistol could have been made earlier than 1812 and reproofed when resold(likely made late 18th century)). It appears to have a bridled lock. Brass barreled pistols were not uncommon and the lack of a royal cypher would lead me to believe civilian use as opposed to military. The initialed escutcheon is more likely indicative of civilian use. It lacks the roller frizzen and waterproof pan of a more expensive London made gun. Less expensive pistols were made for export/trade by some of the Birmingham and Belgium makers for many years.
As for sea duty? Maybe. I have had a few that bore both English and Belgium proofs. The Belgians exported thousands of barrels to the trade worldwide.
If you should chose to remove the barrel from the stock be careful as the wood is probably quite brittle and grunge may cause the wood to adhere to the metal.
Might want to check to see if it's loaded. I have encountered more than a few over the years that were. Nice old pistol, wouldn't it be nice to know where its been.

I have had 2 Bulldogs go through my hands in the past 40 years and they are interesting. I have seen several recently and as usual they are either in pristine condition or well used. The grips on yours are replacments. I have seen both checkered gutta percha and checkered walnut grips.
Just my opinion always open to correction.

Norton Commando
April 18, 2011, 01:53 PM
Thanks Sportclay; good information!

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