Why did they buy the gun at all?


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droptoptrk
April 22, 2011, 12:51 PM
I may be missing something, but in looking through classifieds for guns I always see ads that state something along the line of "less than 100 rounds fired.":confused:

I put between 200 and 400 rounds through each of my guns every time I go to the range.

Are they lying when they claim such low usage or did they decide they didn't like their gun purchase after minimal use?

Seems to me they could have rented the gun and saved a lot of time and money.

If you ever buy a gun from me, trust me it has been used.

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ColtPythonElite
April 22, 2011, 12:53 PM
My dad has a very large safe with a few guns he has never shot and a pile of guns he has never put 100 rounds thru. My grandfather has a large wooden gun cabinet filled with guns that he has never shot.....Some guys just buy guns.

Rail Driver
April 22, 2011, 12:58 PM
I find it slightly irritating when I'm shopping around for a used firearm and all I see is "LNIB" or "New! Unfired!" and all that. I think there are some out there that do lie about it though. I recently bought a Ruger Blackhawk that had supposedly only been fired 3 times... Well it looks more like he took it to the range 3 times and never cleaned it... The cylinder face even had crud stuck to it.

Vonderek
April 22, 2011, 12:59 PM
A lot of new gun owners will buy a gun because they feel unsafe for whatever reason...current events, too much TV news, a decline in their neighborhood, whatever. They buy a gun and think that merely having a gun will make them safe...like a talisman. They go to the range to actually fire it, usually without any instruction. They don't like the recoil or they rightly feel incapable of controlling a potentially dangerous tool. It either sits in a drawer unused or they sell it. It's like buying a used motorcycle. There are plenty of used motorcycles for sale several years old with only a few thousand miles on it. A lot of new riders will buy one and then realize there is a commitment involved or will garage it after riding through their first thunderstorm. They realize it wasn't for them after all.

droptoptrk
April 22, 2011, 01:12 PM
Alright, I see your points:

1. Some people have more guns than they have the time to shoot (wish I had that problem)

and

2. People will buy guns for protection without ever taking the time to learn how to shoot them proficiently (scary)

I would also assume that there are those who buy a gun, and then find out their spouse doesn't want guns in the house.

It just seemed funny to me; I spend a few hundred dollars minimum to buy a gun, plus put up with a waiting period and tons of red tape from California. After going to that much trouble and cost; I am going to shoot it.

KodiakBeer
April 22, 2011, 01:18 PM
Most of those people are lying, but I don't care. Any quality firearm will last a lifetime if you shoot 1000 rounds a year or so, and most people don't shoot even that much.

shiftyer1
April 22, 2011, 01:18 PM
I just traded off a shotgun I bought used almost 2 years ago, I never fired it one time. Can we say IMPULSE buy, sometimes it's just impossible to pass up a good deal.

texas bulldog
April 22, 2011, 01:24 PM
Yeah, there are probably lots of reason.

Some guys on here have in excess of 100 guns. With that many, I would imagine some get shot very little or not at all. Either that, or they have WAY more time and money than I do.

Other guys buy guns primarily for home defense or SHTF-type scenarios. They learn how to operate them and they never fire them again.

Still others just like to buy new toys. They buy a new gun, shoot it a few times, then start obsessing over the next toy they want to purchase, be it a different gun, a motorcycle, a boat, whatever. I see lots of those types, unfortunately. They never seem satisfied with anything.

rogertc1
April 22, 2011, 01:28 PM
Well I have over 200 firearms..a lot have not or hardy been fired. It is called a collector. i am a collector. I have 8 cars too and can't driv e em them much either....a collector.

rogertc1
April 22, 2011, 01:31 PM
I find it slightly irritating when I'm shopping around for a used firearm and all I see is "LNIB" or "New! Unfired!" and all that. I think there are some out there that do lie about it though. I recently bought a Ruger Blackhawk that had supposedly only been fired 3 times... Well it looks more like he took it to the range 3 times and never cleaned it... The cylinder face even had crud stuck to it.

Guilty..well don't buy it then. Look at it first. LOL Like it is hard to clean off.

CraigC
April 22, 2011, 01:38 PM
Some folks are just impulsive. Some folks, like myself, buy guns they're really hot for and get distracted. You change jobs, move off somewhere, lots of different things. I have a brand new Winchester 1892 Trapper .45Colt in its original box that I've had for ten years but have only shot one time. I have a 30yr old S&W that was bought NIB a year ago with no intentions of it staying that way and I've only shot it once. Sometimes, it just happens that way.

12131
April 22, 2011, 01:40 PM
Different strokes for different folks. Many reasons are already sated above. I see nothing funny about it.

FourteenMiles
April 22, 2011, 01:42 PM
People have different financial situations, consumer habits, and spending habits.

I own about a half dozen high quality backpacks, some with very little use on them. I bought some of them with an intended purpose, and it may have just not panned out. I hang on to them mostly due to laziness, and the "what if..." scenarios (lending pack, back-up pack, etc).

I bought one 4 months ago (hopefully the last one for a long time), that I have not even used yet. I just took the tags off, filled it with gear, and wore it around the backyard a little bit to test its fit. If I needed some cash, or decided to buy a new product on the market that I just had to have, I could sell it and describe it in some manner akin to "LNIB", though I have never like that phrase in particular.

There is a thread in the rifle sub-forum where someone is contemplating buying a third Mosin, even though he bought two recently, and has yet to even fire (at least) one of them.

I am not saying that all those "LNIB, under 100 rounds fired" ads are completely honest, I am just saying some of us may not be the most logical of consumers. Our loss can be your gain! ;)

rogertc1
April 22, 2011, 01:45 PM
here is my last purchase as a collector...

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=588528

rooter
April 22, 2011, 01:51 PM
I may be missing something, but in looking through classifieds for guns I always see ads that state something along the line of "less than 100 rounds fired."

It is kinda like asking how many men your girlfriend has been with. Take the number she says, multiply it by 3, divide the product in half, add 15%, and you are alot closer to the true number.

Robert
April 22, 2011, 02:05 PM
In this economy it might just be possible that they had a recent lay off... like me.

Rembrandt
April 22, 2011, 02:05 PM
Your premise is flawed.....don't need to shoot 200-to-400 rounds through each gun every time you go to the range to justify owning it.

If I did that, I'd be shooting 36,000 rounds a week. I own guns with low mileage because I can....not because I need them.

dogmush
April 22, 2011, 02:06 PM
Depends on the person, and the collection. I have guns I don't shoot much;

I have a 4" 1911, I bought several years ago as a project. I put about 50 rds through it and put it away untill I get around to the work.

I have a NAA mini revolver, that after 2 cylinders I just don't like. I'll probably sell that one (eventually) with 10 rds through it.

I don't shoot my milsurps much, just like having them.

My first rifle (a Ruger M77) has about 100 rds through it in 15 years. Still in the safe, just not much use.

I have other guns that see 1000-1500 rds a month sometimes. Just depends on what I'm shooting. Truth be told, if I ever had to sell some, the low round count ones would go first, just because I use them less.

yhtomit
April 22, 2011, 02:11 PM
I've had the same question (Why are they selling? What a depreciation!) ... but then, I can explain at least some ways it comes to be, looking at my own experience.

I've never sold a gun, but I've bought a few. So, I have a small handful (more than 1, less than 200, to place it in this thread ;)), and at least two of them have never been fired, or fired by me in the case of a used one. So if I *did* have to sell any, I'd honestly note their low or zero round count. A few factors that lead to this (unfortunate, or not) situation:

- The general reason, IMO: Not everyone's in the same situation, wrt places to shoot, disposable income, time division, etc. I travel a lot, have moved several times while keeping guns in storage, but since (I hope) life is long, I've bought a few because I knew the gun was a great deal and that I would down the line get the chance to shoot it.

- At least some guns are quite good looking; I'd rather spend my money on guns as sculpture than on, I dunno, a huge TV set, which has its uses but is just about guaranteed to lose value both short and long term. Would settle for just "medium sized" on the TV (maybe none for even longer, though I'm not anti-TV), to keep more in the general savings / investment kitty, as well as for other hobby interests, such as guns. Tastes vary; I think my Witness Elite Match is in the sculpture category, and my 625, too.

- I don't want to assume that guns are getting more convenient to acquire, just because some cosmetic laws don't have as much pull at the moment. There are fits and starts, but (for instance) I'd rather own a Saiga (as currently available) than have a trade-and-bluster war mean that Russian arms are put on a politically motivated list of non-importables. That sounds silly, but we in the U.S. don't get Norinco imports ... My Saiga's been shot a few times, and will more later. It works and is fun, can tell you that!

- If you live in a city or suburbia, shooting is more complicated than stepping onto the back porch (which is the lucky case for some of my friends and relatives ;)). Getting to a range or other appropriate place isn't necessarily a huge burden in the places I've lived, but it's an excursion. I'd rather have a few guns on hand when I go shooting to enjoy learning their feel and operation, even if that means spreading the ammo costs among them.

- Some people (I'm not one) enjoy the novelty of different guns enough that a hundred rounds or a few hundred satisfies one itch, but inspires the next acquisition, or they just enjoy the horse-trading aspect.

- Ammo is expensive. Enough so that when I go to the range, I tend to shoot slowly, and a lot of .22, while going easy on larger calibers.

- I can't prove the future, but optimistically, I'd like to one day bequeath my guns to interesting friends and offspring (or other relatives). So, akin to the "sculpture" idea above, there are guns that I've had in mind for their aesthetics and IMO long-term worth at least as much as the kick I get out of shooting them.

- Life gets in the way :) Shooting's fun, but so are eating, traveling, reading, and other things. I'd rather have a gun and be unable to shoot it on a given occasion than wish I had one when it was needed, or find that buying it is out of the current budget.

timothy

Onward Allusion
April 22, 2011, 02:17 PM
droptoptrk (http://www.thehighroad.org/member.php?u=151953)
Why did they buy the gun at all?
I may be missing something, but in looking through classifieds for guns I always see ads that state something along the line of "less than 100 rounds fired.":confused:
I put between 200 and 400 rounds through each of my guns every time I go to the range.
Are they lying when they claim such low usage or did they decide they didn't like their gun purchase after minimal use?
Seems to me they could have rented the gun and saved a lot of time and money.
If you ever buy a gun from me, trust me it has been used.

Short answer, 'cause they can.

Longer answer - Because they can afford to do that. Some guys buy cars as collectibles, others buy coins, and others buy guns. Gotta do something, right?

longshot7.62x51
April 22, 2011, 02:21 PM
i have 2 guns that i havve never shot one and old 1917 eddystone(its been in peices since it was given to me and is at the gunsmith as we speak) and an Ariasaka carbine (couldent find rounds for it that where cheaper than $2 a round but bought a box from norma so gunna fix that)

Nushif
April 22, 2011, 02:34 PM
[QUOTE]You change jobs, move off somewhere, lots of different things./QUOTE]

Exactly. I have an Egyptian knockoff Beretta sitting in my closet that's never been shot. Distraction is probably the best term for this. I have to wonder why the OP is so cynical? I mean ... what's wrong with the notion of getting bored with a gun?

Had a similar problem when selling my G26. HAd to explain at nauseum as to "why" I was selling a "supposedly flawless" gun and people were being downright insulting at times. Maybe I just don't like being called a liar, too.

Point being though is that *maybe* people change their minds? I know it's highly frowned on in these parts, but man ... it happens. I don't know anyone who can maintain one thought or opinion their entire lives. It happens when you continually assess your circumstance.

crracer_712
April 22, 2011, 02:39 PM
A friend of mine lives in the city, huge gun nut. Has several guns in his cabinet that have never been fired. He usually bring them to my place in the country, but really, there is only so much time in the day to shoot and he's got more than he can try out in a day.
I've got a shotgun I bought just for turkey hunting. Other than firing it to make sure it worked, that's the only use its gotten.

CraigC
April 22, 2011, 02:47 PM
Some of us also realize that you can only get really good with a particular firearm or platform by focusing on it. Rather than shooting several guns every range trip. Some are kept warm through continuous use, others are left to languish only to come out once in a while for fun.

MtnSpur
April 22, 2011, 02:52 PM
My father-in-law bought a Winchester 94 in late 79 (we believe). When he passed away we inherited the rifle NIB with tags still attached. Yes it does happen folks

http://i1105.photobucket.com/albums/h351/MtnSpur/IMG_08591024x768800x600.jpg

merlinfire
April 22, 2011, 03:24 PM
Sometimes you get a gun and decide you'd rather have a different one. Happens all the time

kayak-man
April 22, 2011, 03:31 PM
I've got 2 guns with low round counts.

1 is a single shot twelve guage that I bought as a "truck gun." Has at the most 50rds through it, although its probably closer to 20.

The other is my Savage 30-06. I bought it last summer, but for the first month after I bought it, I didn't have time to go to the range, and I started out the next month with shoulder surgery, so I'm still waiting to take see how it shoots. I'm thinking that I should be able to take it out in a couple weeks.

SleazyRider
April 22, 2011, 03:33 PM
My favorite is when guys brag about how many thousands of rounds they shoot each year, but whenever it comes time to sell a gun, it always seems to have fewer than 100 rounds through it.

crm7290
April 22, 2011, 03:36 PM
I have a couple friends who have never shot a couple of their guns. They would rather shoot clays than mess with rifles all day. Where we go the range is only about 100 yards so it gets a little boring after a bit. Clays are fun all day.

I just got my first shotgun myself and already have shot 300 shells through it. I got it a week ago today. It will be shot as often as possible until I get a handgun and the ammo money will be split between the two.

MtnSpur, the best part about that is that it was purchased at Target. They dont even sell guns anymore

CraigC
April 22, 2011, 04:02 PM
My favorite is when guys brag about how many thousands of rounds they shoot each year, but whenever it comes time to sell a gun, it always seems to have fewer than 100 rounds through it.
Maybe they're keeping the ones they use and selling the ones they don't??? ;)

Flynt
April 22, 2011, 04:09 PM
I buy several guns in a category, i.e., .44 rifle, over a period of a few months. I play with them all (shooting less than 100 rnds.) and determine which is a keeper. I sell the rest. At least that's my theory. It's a lot easier for me to buy a gun that to sell one, but I have been partially successful.

I plan to thin the herd of 5 .44 rifles and carbines down to a rifle and carbine. We'll see if I can stick to the plan or not.

MtnSpur
April 22, 2011, 06:03 PM
MtnSpur, the best part about that is that it was purchased at Target. They dont even sell guns anymore

That and he got 10% off the price on the tag :) . In his later years he bought or was given 4 or 5 handguns that he just put in the safe and never fired so, back on topic, it doesn't surprise me one bit there are plenty of unfired or rarely fired once taken out of the case/box guns out there.
Now if I can just find a S&W Model 10 ANIB for $300 :what: .Yeah right...lol

mljdeckard
April 22, 2011, 06:27 PM
I think a lot of people fall in lust with a gun and have poor impulse control, the GOTTA have it right now. When they actually get it, they shoot it once or twice, and it kind of gets crossed off of their mental list of things they absolutely must have. Then they get two or three guns, prefer a different one, and then their wife gets pregnant. They decide it's time to thin the herd a little.

Zoogster
April 22, 2011, 06:31 PM
People do things like that all the time.

I remember someone that bought a brand new motorcycle from a dealer, used it for a month and determined it was not right for them.
They of course lost most of the value the second they took it off the lot, and could have learned all they needed without buying it, and certainly not buying a brand new one from a dealer, but that is what they did.

Of course there is 1 of every such real scenario for every 100x a used car salesman will claim it.
Just as most of those claims on guns are likely exaggerations by the seller, the extent of the exaggeration varying.

But it does happen. I had a gun for several years that I liked and had only fired 30 rounds through. I liked it, but it just got a partial tryout and sat around because each round cost a few bucks, and I would rather spend my time and money elsewhere.
I didn't have a reloading setup yet, and a low number of expensive shots was not more fun than a high number of less expensive shots.
I knew eventually I might want to have it available, so it served a potential purpose but went largely unused.

dirtyjim
April 22, 2011, 06:34 PM
i'm closing in on the 100 gun mark and at least half of those i have haven't made a trip to the range yet, but there are a couple of rifles i take to the range every time i go.
i basically buy rifles i like or rifles that are priced where i know i can turn them later for a good profit and use the money to buy something i would rather have. so if i'm selling a rifle there is a very good chance i haven't shot it at all.

Karl Hungus
April 22, 2011, 06:34 PM
There are legions of people who buy guns and only put like 20 rounds down the pipe per year. Like most of the people I know. When we talk about shooting and I mention that I go through hundreds of round per week they can't believe it. Lots of different people buy guns, not all of them are shooters. Personally, I love the guys with ultra-low mileage guns for sale.

Shawn Dodson
April 22, 2011, 06:48 PM
I bought a Winchester 9422 about 20 years ago. I always wanted a lever action repeating rimfire rifle instead of an autoloader because semiautos get so doggone filthy.

I've probably put 200 rounds thru it, if that. I just never warmed up to it. It just sits in the gun safe. It's such a good looking little rifle. I've recently been thinking about selling it.

RevDerb
April 22, 2011, 07:09 PM
I bought a Winchester 9422 about 20 years ago. I always wanted a lever action repeating rimfire rifle instead of an autoloader because semiautos get so doggone filthy.

I've probably put 200 rounds thru it, if that. I just never warmed up to it. It just sits in the gun safe. It's such a good looking little rifle. I've recently been thinking about selling it.
Multiply what you paid for it by 3, divide the product by 2 and add 15% and you'll arrive at your selling price.:D

dickttx
April 22, 2011, 07:15 PM
The people who are posting that they have 100/200/300 guns and buy them because they like them, or collect them are NOT the ones selling their guns.

yhtomit
April 22, 2011, 07:38 PM
To expand on one earlier-mentioned reason for low round counts: ammo price.

That's why I'm thinking about a .22LR revolver, and perhaps even a higher-end one (Smith & Wesson 617) than the Taurus that got me mulling that idea over. A bulk box of .22 costs $15 or so; that's enough to keep me occupied for a little while ;)

Even reloading, which I've done but due to moving and other excitement am not currently set up for, it gets expensive to shoot .45, even though I like it. Low round counts on all my .45s, therefore.

timothy

Creature
April 22, 2011, 07:40 PM
Much like nuclear bombs...some are for protection and not actually used very much.

clancy12
April 22, 2011, 07:48 PM
Also, kick@$$ guns that people buy but after a few rounds realize they like smaller stuff.

Brock Landers
April 22, 2011, 07:54 PM
You have to assume that the vast majority of those claiming to have fewer than 100 rounds through their guns are lying. Really, how many gun listings do you see where the seller claims to have 8,000 rounds fired?

I can maybe see someone selling something like a Remington 700 or something similar telling the truth about having less than 100 rounds fired, but I love seeing someone list an AK or AR with 10 30 round mags while claiming the gun has fired less than 200 rounds.

BigN
April 22, 2011, 07:56 PM
I think you're comparing regular folks who own guns, sporadic hunters/shooters, to people like us. This website is for shooters. We are not the norm, we are the exception. I'm guessing that we're also a very small percentage of the population that actually owns guns. Most people buy guns, shoot them 5 times during hunting season, clean them, and put them away. Those are the guns you need to buy. 10 year-old guns that have less than a box of shells through them...

RockyMtnTactical
April 22, 2011, 07:58 PM
Trust me! Most people do not shoot their guns.

They get them, they shoot them once. They put it in the closest for 20 years.

Seriously this happens more than you would think.

Ole Coot
April 22, 2011, 08:10 PM
I bought a NIB Beretta mini Cougar just because the person had bought it and when he got home found his wife left him and he needed cash. I gave him 50% of what he paid. I didn't like it, didn't feel right so it stayed in the safe for a couple of years until I could sell it at a very good profit and picked up one I do shoot. Just an investment for a great return.

jiminhobesound
April 22, 2011, 09:23 PM
yhtomit gave a very comprehensive answer. I will ad that I started shooting guns, hunting, plinking, military, college rifle team 65 years ago. I put some 3,000 rounds through a Garand in a nine month period. I bet I could pick one up right now, after forty years, and do as well as I can see. I have not shot regularly for about ten years. However, after only God knows how many rounds with every type of firearm, i do not have to practice much with defensive weapons. I have rifles that i no longer shoot because of arthritis. I sincerely believe that I am still proficient. I may not take any prizes over ten yards but within those ten yards I feel quite confident of being a good enough shot.

SleazyRider
April 22, 2011, 10:42 PM
Maybe they're keeping the ones they use and selling the ones they don't??? ;)
Could be, but I suspect that many of these e-warriors are simply full of crap.

jhansman
April 22, 2011, 11:35 PM
It took less than a hundred rounds for me to get that I was not a 1911 kinda guy. Sold the gun virtually new, and have not missed it at all. Sometimes we just buy wrong.

AlexanderA
April 23, 2011, 01:36 AM
I have several guns that I bought new 20 or 30 years ago and have never fired, and don't ever intend to fire. Others had been fired before they came to me (say, in WWII) but haven't been fired while in my hands.

This is not a disgrace. I have enough guns that I actually shoot (although admittedly less and less as I get older), but to me guns are not primarily tools to be used. They're works of art to be treasured. To each his own, I guess.

There are those of us who are collectors and not necessarily shooters.

rocky branch
April 23, 2011, 01:46 AM
I'm an accumulator, though I tend towards certain areas.

Sometimes I bcome "inspired" and buy something that catches my attention.

If nothing else, casual purchases can be converted to "tradin' stock,"

If I sat around worrying the "why" of everything, I wouldn't get much done.

coloradokevin
April 23, 2011, 02:13 AM
It doesn't usually make sense to me, though I could understand why someone might sell off a gun they just bought and found that they didn't like.

It seems like this situation is quite similar to the people who sell their nearly new cars. I drive my cars until the wheels fall off, while other folks buy new on a yearly basis!

Usmc-1
April 23, 2011, 10:52 AM
City slickers buy guns all the time , then realize they have no place to shoot them , the local range costs money , it might ok a few times a month , but not everyday !

Plus you might buy it on impulse and once in your hands it doesnt feel right so you never shoot , or the old "ICONIC" crowd , I have an Indian motorcycle (2003 Vintage Chief) , when Indian came back into production a whole lot people bought into the "Iconic" collector bs , and paid 35 k for a bike they never rode , thinking it will be worth alot of money someday ,hasnt happened! Oh I also have a 1946 Indian Chief (w/a left hand sidecar)!!And that chief never moves!

gym
April 23, 2011, 11:05 AM
I think most are telling the truth, it's like cars. A buddy was a Porshe dealer, and he got many a new porshe's back after a week or two, probablly the same with most expensive sports that are faster than the driver. He loved it because some doctor would but one, and his wife would bitch about getting in and out, and the guy didn't like the ride, so He would make a quick 10-15 thousand and re- sell it for a few thousand less than new again. People buy things first and the see if they like them. Always have, more when times are good. But they will always do this. I think a lot of folks buy a 1911, then find out it's more work than say a Glock or other plastic gun, they are afraid to disasemble it and generally afraid to carry it peoperly in the ready position, so they just sell it. That's most of the issue I find with used 1911's people aren't real gun people buy them because they think they are cool, like old guys with bikes or sports cars. Then they find they don't really have the heart for them. Me I will still do doughnuts with a hi performance anything till the put me down.

captain awesome
April 23, 2011, 11:08 AM
I have some guns that don't get shot much. mostly due to lack of time, in my slow work seasons, its lack of income. This may not be the wisest saving practice, but instead of throwing money in a savings account, I usually look for a great deal on a used gun. The philosophy is that money in the bank is neither working for me(at least not enough to make much of a difference) nor entertaining, while i can have fun with the gun. So far it has worked out, as I have made a heck of a lot more money selling them than I would have just with savings account interest, and I have never lost a dime on one. A fair amount of those purchases don't end up with much range time.

Ryanxia
April 23, 2011, 11:43 AM
What gets me is the people who say LNIB only 200 rounds or w/e through them that are asking full retail price. It's like driving a car off the lot then wanting full price for it. Like it's been stated above it only takes a cleaning but you can't really tell if there has been 100 or 1000 rounds through it (I can't anyway).

gym
April 23, 2011, 12:22 PM
Capt., I wish we all did that instead of losing money in the market, although we have had the "Guns for investmant" thread done to death, The fact is that 90% of my guns went up, and 90% of my stocks went down. So putting quality guns as you describe, like a nice colt 1911, isn't ever going to hurt you, And will only go up over a 10 yr period, I can't say that for anything else. Gold, and all metals will only help if on hand, and one of those , end of days" scenarios takes place, and even then they will be trading the gold for guns and ammo. and food So you are in my opinion doing the proper thing, as long as you buy good quality rifles and pistols, along with ammo for them. Funny I was looking at my house early today, and there is not one room "excluding 3 bathrooms", that don't have windows in them, It's the latest code on 1 floor, and is cinderblock,but it would be impossible to defend against a group with weapons, someone should invent a kelar type shutter system that was bullett proof, I bet they would make a ton of money.

Black Butte
April 23, 2011, 01:10 PM
What gets me is the people who say LNIB only 200 rounds or w/e through them that are asking full retail price. It's like driving a car off the lot then wanting full price for it. Like it's been stated above it only takes a cleaning but you can't really tell if there has been 100 or 1000 rounds through it (I can't anyway).

Be careful. Under the guise of "consumer protection," your comments might inspire our government to mandate that "shot odometers" be integral to every firearm before they leave the factory.

Badlander
April 23, 2011, 01:32 PM
I think that if you can afford to shoot 200 to 400 rifle rounds every time you go shooting you can aford to own lots of guns, or you don't go shooting often.

T.R.
April 23, 2011, 01:41 PM
My Dad (1922 - 2004) hated to "waste" anything. He always felt guilty about shooting targets for fun. I doubt that his old 99 Savage even had 200 cartridges fired through it in over 50 years of use!!

I'm certain that there are many folks like Dad.

TR

NMGonzo
April 23, 2011, 08:34 PM
I can't afford thousands of rounds a year ... so my guns are not run raw or worn down to nothing. :/

speedway
April 23, 2011, 09:06 PM
When you have a number of firearms, it is not uncommon for a bunch of them to get neglected to a point where they become safe queens, and thus sold with low round counts.

I am narrowing down the scope of my collection, and have parted with polymer guns that had super low round counts.

gym
April 23, 2011, 09:09 PM
It's worth being a law enforcment officer just for the free ammo, at least the ones who still give it free. I would make full use of that if I were a bit younger. Now that they lifted the age restrictions in FL, "i don't know about the rest of the country" but you see all white haired guys driving police cars now. Granted some are retired from their main career, but the pay is great and so are the benefits, and they are always hiring. If that would have been the case when I moved here in 94, I would have jumped in, plus it's OJT for many, very little to no school, maybe a couple weeks of basics.
I'm talking Indian river County, I'm sure in Miami you are going to have a tougher time. But here when a cat is stuck in a tree it makes the TV news. I think they were talking 60,000 after 3 years with full benifits, plus you get a car to drive for free.With OT you can live well on that here. Almost a 6 figure job.

blackspyder
April 23, 2011, 09:53 PM
Some guns don't need firing every time you go out. I have a Rem.7500 (30-06) that hasn't had 5 rounds through it in the 10 years I've had it. I've got two Rem. 750's I've put 50 rounds total through them in the last 10 years (I put 2 scopes on one, and used it hunting once before swapping to the other one). I've got an S&W .38 revolver (pre-Model 10) that I put exactly 5 rounds through since it was inherited. Put 5 round through the new Rem 870 Express 12 Ga. 3.5" patterning it.

Why don't I fire these guns that often? I just have other guns I prefer to shoot, they serve a purpose in my arsenal (Who doesn't need a 3.5" capable 12Ga?) but they dont need 10k rounds through them just because.

LeonCarr
April 23, 2011, 11:54 PM
I guess I am the anti-collector. I own 8 firearms and they all get shot regularly. I feel that owning them and not knowing how to use them to their full potential is the biggest sin of all.

The handguns get shot every week and I take a rifle or shotgun about every other visit to the range. All of mine are utilitarian type, non reflective matte finished workhorses, no beauty queens or safe queens, except a side by side double 12 gauge that belonged to my great-grandfather and is black powder pressure loads only and has a cracked pistol grip stock.

I think lots of people have big collections to satisfy an ego or brag to their friends.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

GRIZ22
April 24, 2011, 12:21 AM
City slickers buy guns all the time ,

Well so do country folks. If you have a lot of guns there are those you shoot all the time and those that you bought that you just wanted, tried them out, and keep them.

MtnSpur
April 24, 2011, 09:19 AM
I guess I am the anti-collector. I own 8 firearms and they all get shot regularly. I feel that owning them and not knowing how to use them to their full potential is the biggest sin of all.

I think lots of people have big collections to satisfy an ego or brag to their friends.

Just my .02r

Some people say PO-TATE-TOE some PO-TAH-TOE. While your 8 gun "collection" satisfies your needs, I know many collectors that may have 100+ and they can disassemble/reassemble, tell you every ballistic fact of each weapon and shoot many. The exception would be a weapon that would devalue in price if shot (ie: antique Colts).
Some folks actually make a fine living buying/selling collectible firearms like some folks buy sell antique furniture and gold & jewelry.

Chest thumpers and egomaniacs abound everywhere. Folks that know their weapons, collect and enjoy them for their own pleasure and satisfaction don't care what you or I think about it.

hso
April 24, 2011, 09:54 AM
Are they lying when they claim such low usage or did they decide they didn't like their gun purchase after minimal use?


You're making the assumption that other people purchase guns and use them the way you do. Some folks don't have ready access to rental ranges. Others just like having a gun more than shooting or have enough different guns that they don't have time to put a lot of rounds through any one.

A well known gun blogger that will not be named had a reputation for purchasing firearms that they would trade in or sell within weeks or sometimes days after purchase. They might have less than a box through them. Those of us that knew about this propensity had a lot of fun conjecturing on just how short a time a new gun would end up being traded or sold off.

People are just different.

TriTone
April 24, 2011, 10:09 AM
I may be missing something... Let's find out...

...Are they lying when they claim such low usage or did they decide they didn't like their gun purchase after minimal use?

No reason to assume someone is lying because their habits are different that yours. Most of my guns have thousands of rounds through them. My latest XD-9 has about 9,000 rounds through it at the moment. That said I also have an HKUSP9 that only has about 200 rounds through it.

I've also purchased and sold several guns in the last year that just didn't work out. There are a load of reasons why you might turn around and sell a gun after only a few boxes of ammo.

Seems to me they could have rented the gun and saved a lot of time and money.

If there is a place around that has the gun to rent. Even then, sometimes you try the rental gun and you really like it so you get one, then when you get your own you discover little ( or even big ) things that you didn't realize on the rental gun. Sometimes you realize you just don't like it as much as you thought you would, so why keep it around if you're not gonna enjoy it?

If you ever buy a gun from me, trust me it has been used.

Good to know, the same is true of all guns that have been shot. :neener:

slowr1der
April 24, 2011, 12:07 PM
While some of these guns may really be shot this little, a lot of them are liars. 95% of the guns I've ever seen for sale the guys claim either it's only had 2 boxes of shells through it, it's only had two magazines full through it, or it's had less than 100 rounds. The large majority of them you can tell they have been shot quite a bit, way more than they are claiming. I've learned to take this with a grain of salt. To me a used gun is used and brings a used price. I go by what it looks like appearance wise internally and externally. If two used guns are identical appearance wise, I'm going to be willing to pay the same amount for a gun that the owner claims is fired 2000 times versus one that the owner claims has only had a box through it.

I have a friend that always believes this though and just about every gun he buys he pays an almost new price, and sometimes more than new, claiming he got a great deal because it was basically new since it only had a couple of rounds through it. Most of these guns have been shot a ton, but he refuses to believe that. The last one he got he showed me and it looked nice on the outside, but once we field stripped it, you could see there was tons of wear on the inside. The guy that sold it to him sold it to him for about $100 more than they normally go for claiming it had only had a magazine through it. Yeah right.

Cryogaijin
April 24, 2011, 12:17 PM
I've put probably 75 rounds through my hunting rifle. The bugger is simply so accurate that it isn't terribly fun to shoot. The most fun I got out of it was taking 4 gallon jugs of water out to the 300 yard limit of the Fairbanks gun range, and trying to pop them all before they froze.

Easy at 0f. Impossible at -40f.

Everything else I own I've put several hundred rounds through.

rogertc1
April 24, 2011, 12:47 PM
"I think lots of people have big collections to satisfy an ego or brag to their friends. "

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Kinda rude Leon...I don't look at a collection as a phallic symbol as you perhaps do. Have guns cause I want to. There are have and have nots. I have guns and cars. It is an addiction. But I don't waste money going to bars or gambling either....everyone is different.
This calls for some of in gun room pictures Leon: (All 4 walls are full) I have posted them before.
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c248/rogertc1/firearms/Boewulf.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c248/rogertc1/firearms/GuideGuns1.jpg

LeonCarr
April 24, 2011, 02:17 PM
I am impressed. If that is really your personal collection, why do they have gun shop type tags on them?

rogertc1
April 24, 2011, 03:14 PM
When I have my gun room full of guns Over the 200 mark. (Trying to quit now as I have everything so far i want) I tag (tags from Office max.) them all and even keep a spread sheet too. Pushing 60 I notice my memory is not as good as it used to be. I have year purchased, caliber and type firearm. I Tag the military helmets, Inert rounds, and a bazooka too. I mark all the exta mags and drums with a silver sharpie with what gun they go to. Have Lots of ammo too.
Brag ...hell yes. It is one of my personal accomplishment. My museum.
Really fun to sit in my room, turn in my chair, and see all my collection at once displayed. I can recall 40 years of acquisitions and enjoyment. Really makes me happy. Kinda like Donald Ducks Uncle Scruge swimming in his money vaults.
Daily money bath cartoon.
http://weheartlife.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/scrooge_mcduck.jpg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBRrCY5uhWY

I just reorganized the vault so I will have to take some new pictures and post soon.

ny32182
April 24, 2011, 04:21 PM
Most of my actual shooting goes through a small number of guns. Therefore I have a small handful with thousands of rounds through them. Then I have some that are unfired, some that have well under 500 rounds, and the rest have +/- 1000 or so. When I sell, it is always one of the lower round count variety. If I liked it enough to put thousands of rounds through, I probably wouldn't want to sell it.

I'm sure some sellers are BSing the round count, but I would expect the percentage is small. Most gun owners are not shooters. Of the gun owners I know from work, etc (basically gun owners I met outside of an actual shooting context) I would expect any gun they own to have a very low round count. I know several folks who bought a pistol, went to the range once, fired 100 rounds, and it has been sitting in a shoebox in the closet ever since. I would expect this happens a hundred times more often than someone buying a pistol and actually shooting thousands of rounds a year through it.

Vaarok
April 24, 2011, 05:15 PM
The one I usually see is deer rifles, used one season, "less than one box of shells fired", and then priced such that it's obvious the seller is trying to recoup the full purchase price.

Justin
April 24, 2011, 05:37 PM
Long story short:

Most guns have very low round counts because most gun owners are dirt shooters.

Sent from my Android smart phone using Tapatalk.

jimmyraythomason
April 24, 2011, 05:39 PM
dirt shooters.
definition please.

BigN
April 24, 2011, 05:45 PM
If a person takes good care of a gun and keeps it clean, etc.. is there a way of telling if it's had 10 or 500 rounds through it? I'd like to be able to decipher that one, probably save me some $$$ when buying used.

ny32182
April 24, 2011, 05:53 PM
There is so little visible wear at 500 rounds in the guns I've owned that it would be difficult to tell.

Weevil
April 24, 2011, 10:40 PM
Yeah I had a Ruger P90 with well over 5000 rounds through it and other than a few scuff marks on the recoil rod it looked brand new.

But there are people who honestly just don't shoot their guns. Used to work with a guy that had a gorgeous Beretta 92 Inox. His wife had got it for him on his birthday because he had always wanted one after seeing one in a movie or some such thing. In the two years or so he had it, it had never been fired so he asked if he could go to the range with me to try it out. Well he fired a couple of mags through it then wiped it down and put it back in the box. As far as I know he's never shot it since and that was about six years ago.

RevDerb
April 24, 2011, 11:28 PM
Living up in the sticks of northern Michigan, there are no commercial ranges (thank God!) and therefore no rental guns. So if I see something that I think is interesting and would be fun to own and shoot, I buy it and try to sell one of my less favored guns to pay for it. I've gotten to shoot a lot of guns over the years and a lot of people have gotten some very good deals on my cast offs. I either shoot in the woods or at the sportman's club for a $25/yr fee.

Vyacheslav
April 24, 2011, 11:42 PM
i have a few old milsurps that i never shoot and have no intention of shooting, i enjoy collecting them and studying the history behind them, i have a few guns that i shoot all the time, i see nothing wrong with collecting guns just to collect.

Remo223
April 24, 2011, 11:51 PM
If I wanted to shoot all my guns, I'd have to hire people to help me.

sixgunner455
April 25, 2011, 12:43 AM
they bought it because they wanted it.

I have two coworkers, both female veterans, both had a tour in Iraq. One had a stalker a few years back, and went down to the gunstore to buy something to have, just in case he came back. Glock 23. She's never fired it. The other, last summer, decided she ought to have something, just in case. Kahr 9mm. Never been fired.

Multiple shooters at work have offered multiple times to take them shooting, and they say that they want to go, but they obviously don't. Not really. Otherwise, they would do it.

Wanted the gun, wanted to have something, just in case, but actually shooting them doesn't seem that important to some people.

Ignition Override
April 25, 2011, 01:09 AM
Even though my nice classic Yugo Mauser 48A is not new, I've only used about 200-250 rds. because the iron sights require some unique skills which I don't have.

It is for sale FTF only, in the WTS forum.

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