Handguns, Handguns, Handguns... Stupid investment?


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Darebear
April 23, 2011, 02:27 PM
As a amatuer shooter I find myself very attracted to handguns... maybe because the hero's in movies get the job done from 50 yards away with one snub nose 38 or 1911 that magically holds 16 rounds. LOL. But a recent post by another member asking "Why would I want a handgun", which was a awesome and original post... has got me thinking.

I hear all the time how handguns are poor fighting weapons or that handguns are used to fight your way to a "REAL" gun. I LOVE handguns, I own a couple and I want to own more but is it silly to invest in having my favorite handguns? Am I "giving up" a edge when all I have is Handguns for Home Defense? Is there anyone out there that owns just all handguns?

I ask because most gun owners that I know diversify their collection... Handguns, a AR-15 or two, a shotgun etc. I love Tacti-cool rifles and the awesome Robar or Wilson Combat 870's but not enough to drop 1000+ on them.

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Darebear
April 23, 2011, 02:43 PM
Uh-Oh... should I have put this post in the Handgun General Discussion section? Sorry if I put it in the wrong section.

Nushif
April 23, 2011, 03:20 PM
I shoot Handuns mainly and really don't feel you'd be undergunned if you used them as self defense weapons.
Most of the argument for long rifles as defense tools are made because arguably they work betteragainst a 400 pound machette and shotgun wielding Marine trained methhead with a kevlar helmet and body armor.
As to why he's breaking into my student apartment and stealing my XBoxwhen he can afford a vest and shot and a machette and made a decent living with the Marines already, I don't know.

Ultimately you have to look at what you're preparing to do. And if you're just looking to have a last ditch means of lethal force to protect your own or another life, I don't think you're underguuned with a handgun.

Do I own handguns exclusively? No. I do own a .22 rifle a "real" rifle and a shotgun as well. But by far the handguns see the most rounds. Followed by the shotgun.

oldfool
April 23, 2011, 04:53 PM
great comment there Nushif !
(the "scenario constructs" on gun forums do get pretty silly at times)

OP
not every cop on the beat is on the SWAT team
but every cop on the beat carries a sidearm
why shouldn't you, too ?
when you desperately need the cop on the beat (with a sidearm) within seconds, he is most probably minutes distant

Good&Fruity
April 23, 2011, 08:11 PM
I think any weapon is a fine investment. It may save your life oneday. I like to think of it as insurance. It give me peace of mind. I may not survive, but I will not go down easy and without a fight.

gbelleh
April 23, 2011, 08:18 PM
My pistols outnumber my long guns by about 10 to 1. I don't see anything wrong with that. I get much more satisfaction from my pistols for some reason. The long guns tend to sit in the safe untouched for months at a time, while a pistol or two goes out with me every day.

NMGonzo
April 23, 2011, 08:23 PM
It is an stupid investment, but I don't claim being all that smart.

mljdeckard
April 23, 2011, 08:32 PM
Don't use police as an example of which weapon to grab. Their policies reflect political correctness and fears of public perception as much as what is the best option to save the life of the user. In other places in the world where violence is much more likely than here, the police carry rifles.

FIVETWOSEVEN
April 23, 2011, 08:48 PM
Sounds like you are a handgun guy, welcome aboard the club! :)

Nothing wrong with liking handguns just make sure you get all the basics covered. I'm happy with my 870 for a shotgun and aren't really interested in getting another shotgun (Maybe that Kel-Tec KSG :D) and once I finally get a AR 15 or something like that I'll be all set with rifles for now. BUT handguns are what I plan to be building my collection with mostly.

BossHogg
April 23, 2011, 08:51 PM
I've got a shotgun and a 30.06 deer rifle for long guns and they cover my needs. All my other guns are hand guns and are used for CCW and for the most part plain old fun shooting at the range. I ain't skeerd of no zombies.

Darebear
April 23, 2011, 09:38 PM
I've got a shotgun and a 30.06 deer rifle for long guns and they cover my needs. All my other guns are hand guns and are used for CCW and for the most part plain old fun shooting at the range. I ain't skeerd of no zombies.
Lol.

FoMoGo
April 23, 2011, 10:18 PM
We have handguns, rifles, shotguns...
All of our handguns are carry guns.
.44 specials, 1911s, 10mm, .38 Super, .44 magnum...
I have no need of a handgun that I cant carry.
Rifles in .22, .308. 7.62x39, .300WM, .45-70... bolt, semi-auto, and lever action.
All shotguns are 12ga, but they are in break action, pump, and autoloader.
I sleep at home with a 10mm, .45acp, and 12ga next to the bed.
My wife has .44 special and mag, .38 super, .45acp, and 12ga on her side of the bed.
If I know someone is in the house and shouldnt be... a heavy loaded Benelli 121 M1 is what will be used to greet them.
If you will get use out of it... or will be able to turn it for a profit... then I see pretty much any firearm as a good investment.
Dont put yourself in a position to not buy food or pay bills however... I have seen people do that also.

When I am home from working out on the road, I generally have at least 1 handgun and a short rifle or shotgun with me.


Jim

RockyMtnTactical
April 23, 2011, 10:30 PM
I love AR15's, but handguns are the most likely to be used and practical self defense weapons for obvious reasons.

Thorgrim
April 23, 2011, 10:52 PM
As I said on the thread you mentioned, they are different tools for different jobs. It's pointless to try to cut a tree down with a hammer, or drive nails with a chainsaw. I'm not saying that you can't possibly do either, but it really makes no sense.

Regarding investment value, if that's your purpose then look at them, make sure they're lightly oiled, and keep them with the original box and papers. Don't shoot them. All of this runs against the grain with me, I shoot everything I've owned, but collectors will pay more for the pristine "safe queens".

Here's the rub - if you have to sell in hard times, you're most likely going to get skinned, so it isn't a good investment. If you have a faux pas and the police take your guns (very easy when in a "domestic violence" 911 call the man is always wrong), you may lose your whole investment. However ... if you're clever with what you buy and how you care for it, you stand to make a good deal of money.

All of my guns are working guns, although I've often had to sell them to make ends meet (and often lost money because I has to sell them during hard times); however, I bought them to use, not as investments, although they retained most of their value. If I'd bought gold bouillon bars as an investment I doubt I'd have drug them down the road on a rope, and while I'm good to my guns I do use them (I don't drag them on a rope, but they do get a nick or two). Guns are a different thing than bouillon, but if you care for them the same way and buy with the same caution as to price paid and projected value, I'd say you're good.

Skylerbone
April 23, 2011, 11:45 PM
I've gathered a few snow globes, bottles of sand and sea shells over the years. None of those things could be mistaken as an investment but some have become a collection. Nothing wrong with collecting what makes you smile and in your case what can be used to protect yourself if need be.

I've heard that handguns are for those who weren't good enough to make the rifle count and followed that logic for several decades. I now buy what I want and let others think what they will.

If you really want a house gun for HD grab a Marlin lever in .357 and call it a day, it points fast, shoots fast, clears corners in narrow hallways, has knockdown power and a common to wheelgun cartridge. It's also fairly easy to find on the used rack for less than most descent pistols will cost you. All this of course if you're feeling the need to fit the mold or are feeling out-gunned with what you have.

Last thought, it's not likely the POORLY PAID Marine who's breaking down your door, it's likely the crack addict intent on getting $40 for your X-Box at the pawn shop. He may not be trained or armed but he'll surely be intent on his purpose.

Stay safe.

piece of meat
April 23, 2011, 11:56 PM
ha, i totally get the OP. for a long time now even though i know a shotgun, long-range scoped rifle, or AK would provide much more versatile and well-rounded use than another handgun, i still find myself totally wrapped up in handguns. idk why

mljdeckard
April 24, 2011, 12:24 AM
Everyone can like what they like. There's no need to justify what you PREFER to anyone. If you prefer handguns, buy them in all shapes, sizes, calibers, and colors. And for your wife, Shoot the heck out of them. Become an expert on your favorite models, take an armorer's course for it. The more we buy, the more pull we have as an armed community.

That doesn't necessarily mean they are the best option for everything.

Skylerbone
April 24, 2011, 12:34 AM
And for your wife, Shoot the heck out of them.

mljdeckard, I just had to laugh 'cause I saw Utah for your location;-). A little late night rewording, perhaps???

mljdeckard
April 24, 2011, 12:47 AM
I'm in a different hemisphere.

Skylerbone
April 24, 2011, 01:11 AM
Wrong "Utah", that explains the terra-formed zone! Keep up the good work over there, it just read funny in my brain, sort of like the Les Baer feels like a man's tool quote. No offense meant, hopefully none taken sir.

mljdeckard
April 24, 2011, 01:14 AM
Nope. :)

danite
April 24, 2011, 01:34 AM
I shoot Handuns mainly and really don't feel you'd be undergunned if you used them as self defense weapons.
Most of the argument for long rifles as defense tools are made because arguably they work betteragainst a 400 pound machette and shotgun wielding Marine trained methhead with a kevlar helmet and body armor.
As to why he's breaking into my student apartment and stealing my XBoxwhen he can afford a vest and shot and a machette and made a decent living with the Marines already, I don't know.

Ultimately you have to look at what you're preparing to do. And if you're just looking to have a last ditch means of lethal force to protect your own or another life, I don't think you're underguuned with a handgun.

Do I own handguns exclusively? No. I do own a .22 rifle a "real" rifle and a shotgun as well. But by far the handguns see the most rounds. Followed by the shotgun.
i myself keep a shoulder launched tactical nuke i think the guy called it a davey crocket or betty crocker something like that anyway,so far nobody has recovered from a forced entry attempt.i traded it for an old x-box with one copy of halo 3 he had on camo BDUs body armor,and a kevlar hat and said huuu-rah a lot,but he didn't have any spare projectiles(anyone have some laying around)till then i'll just keep the glock 30 with .45 JHPs and the light on the rail under the pillow,in the car/trk etc. there is a plethora of stuff in the safe big bore and small,short barreled long guns,long barreled short guns much to my bride of 40 yrs chagrin.buy them it's easier to get forgiveness than permission.

wbwanzer
April 24, 2011, 10:04 AM
Buy what you like. It's your money. Don't worry about what you're 'supposed' to buy.

Darebear
April 24, 2011, 10:43 AM
Thanks for all the advice guys. Not to turn this thread into a arguement (because I still am concerned about financially investing in handguns) but what about having only a handgun in the residence for protection? Bad idea?

How about this... Is a shotgun overkill in a apartment type residence? I know a rifle is. (I'm not that stupid)

Overall at this point in my life (I'm 23) the only other firearm that I am interested in is a tacti-cool rifle that I plan to build over the next few years... So handgun for HD? Or Is getting the 12 gauge infinitely wise?

MachIVshooter
April 24, 2011, 12:02 PM
Am I "giving up" a edge when all I have is Handguns for Home Defense?

Vs. a rifle or shotgun? Yes. Handguns have their place, but the terminal ballistics are just plain inferior. I keep one on the night stand because it's easier to grab when I'm jolted from sleep at O'dark-thirty, and it's easier to conceal if I need to answer the door without knowing if it's a threat or perhaps a SO deputy for whatever reason. But if I KNOW there is a hostile intruder in my home, you can bet I'll be concealed behind the bed, covering the entryway to the room with the AR.

Is a shotgun overkill in a apartment type residence? I know a rifle is. (I'm not that stupid)

No, it's not. Aside from slugs, shotgun loads are less likely to leave your residence than handgun bullets. The same is true of 5.56mm ammunition (especially frangibles).

gbelleh
April 24, 2011, 12:12 PM
I don't really consider my guns investments. I buy them because I like them, and appreciate their form and function. I don't plan on ever selling most of them. But it's nice that they retain their value.

I consider full size, service caliber handguns enough for home protection. If things look really bad, I will "fight my way" to my Mossberg 590.

reppans
April 24, 2011, 12:26 PM
I'm of the mindset that the only good gun is one you have on you.

I have kids so toting around my 12ga from room-to-room, or even having it loaded by my bedside, is not a good idea. My kids don't even know I'm wearing a CCW and it sleeps under my mattress at night.

However, if I lived way out in the boondocks on acres of land, then I'd definitely want some long guns.

bds
April 24, 2011, 12:40 PM
"Why would I want a handgun"... has got me thinking.

I hear all the time how handguns are poor fighting weapons or that handguns are used to fight your way to a "REAL" gun. I LOVE handguns, I own a couple and I want to own more but is it silly to invest in having my favorite handguns? Am I "giving up" a edge when all I have is Handguns for Home Defense?
I have been told, "Don't bring a knife to a gun fight" and believe superiority in firepower gives me the advantage in defending my home. My primary choice I reach for is a pump shot gun with fullsize handgun as a backup. My wife will reach for the AR with another fullsize handgun as a backup. If you think this response is a bit much, you don't live where we live with frequent home-invasion robberies by gang members who are often armed with Glocks. I shoot with local LEOs and they tell me that 911 response is too slow to protect the citizens involving armed intruders and we MUST have the means to protect ourselves (they often respond only to put home owners in body bags - they would rather it be the other way around).

When I was a teenager learning martial arts, my instructor mentioned to the class one day, "If your opponent is proficient with a gun, you can't move faster than bullets and you'll be at a disadvantage." I learned to handle firearms shortly thereafter. :D

Why do I have a handgun? That's like asking "Do you really need a smart phone to browse the web on the go?" It's a tool that's really nice to have if you need it (believe me, we do). I hope we never need to use Glock 27s we carry everywhere, but I feel more comfortable knowing that we have that option - it sure beats throwing rocks or my bare hands. :rolleyes:

PabloJ
April 24, 2011, 12:51 PM
As a amatuer shooter I find myself very attracted to handguns... maybe because the hero's in movies get the job done from 50 yards away with one snub nose 38 or 1911 that magically holds 16 rounds. LOL. But a recent post by another member asking "Why would I want a handgun", which was a awesome and original post... has got me thinking.

I hear all the time how handguns are poor fighting weapons or that handguns are used to fight your way to a "REAL" gun. I LOVE handguns, I own a couple and I want to own more but is it silly to invest in having my favorite handguns? Am I "giving up" a edge when all I have is Handguns for Home Defense? Is there anyone out there that owns just all handguns?

I ask because most gun owners that I know diversify their collection... Handguns, a AR-15 or two, a shotgun etc. I love Tacti-cool rifles and the awesome Robar or Wilson Combat 870's but not enough to drop 1000+ on them.
Yes, like wide-eyed idiot gun whore which accurately describes me rather well I'm now shopping for legendary Swiss-made Sig P210. I heard early 50s vintage are the best.

danite
April 25, 2011, 12:51 AM
Vs. a rifle or shotgun? Yes. Handguns have their place, but the terminal ballistics are just plain inferior. I keep one on the night stand because it's easier to grab when I'm jolted from sleep at O'dark-thirty, and it's easier to conceal if I need to answer the door without knowing if it's a threat or perhaps a SO deputy for whatever reason. But if I KNOW there is a hostile intruder in my home, you can bet I'll be concealed behind the bed, covering the entryway to the room with the AR.



No, it's not. Aside from slugs, shotgun loads are less likely to leave your residence than handgun bullets. The same is true of 5.56mm ammunition (especially frangibles).
you can get frangible ammo for just about any hand-gun many ranges only allow frangible,i suppose you could load a large bore revolver with snake shot for that matter regarding penetration issues.it would certainly ruin any intruder's plans,even leave some JHPs in if it didn't alter his intent

MachIVshooter
April 25, 2011, 12:27 PM
you can get frangible ammo for just about any hand-gun many ranges only allow frangible

Yes, you can, and that further reduces the terminal effectiveness of already less effective cartridges.

The wounding mechanism is completely different with handguns vs. rifles. Handgun bullets, with their low velocity, only tear tissue that they directly contact. Rifles, however, will create a would channel many times the bullet diameter. 5.56mm has the velocity; Even with the frangible bullets, you still get massive cavitation.

easyg
April 25, 2011, 01:27 PM
While it's true that long guns most often out-perform handguns, in today's world (except in the most extremely savage and lawless corners of the world) the handgun is just more practical.

Rifles and shotguns are great, but when danger rears its ugly head, the long guns are the ones that will most likely not be at hand.

bobnailer
April 26, 2011, 10:14 PM
How does that old West adage go? "Beware the man that owns one gun, he'll know how to use it."
Own a good handgun of your preference, own two long guns... one shotgun, one rifle.
That way you have all your bases covered. Then again, I think of covering bases, not target plinking.
Bob

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