Noticed less Hipoint hate/bashing


PDA






MrWesson
April 25, 2011, 02:00 PM
Yes another hi-point thread but this one is a bit different.

Ive noticed the bashing/hating has died down by at least 50% over the past few years and was curious.

Is it based on the reliability of the platform?
or
Based on the popularity?

What I mean by popularity is if 1 million people are out there to defend what may be a piece of junk does that quiet the "hating"?

I am not a hipoint lover or hater I actually owned a C9 way back and it was a good pistol.

Every firearm's manufacture has to start somewhere do you think that hi-point may head in a direction of Taurus with hicaps/bigger product line?

This is not a debate on what other used guns you can afford in the price range. Most of us know you can get a $200 CZ82 but most new purchasers aren't looking at C&R guns and are purchasing from a gun store.

If you enjoyed reading about "Noticed less Hipoint hate/bashing" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
ColtPythonElite
April 25, 2011, 02:03 PM
I'd guess this thread will bring out some good ole bashing...

Smaug
April 25, 2011, 02:15 PM
Well, if my feelings are any indication, maybe we are just tired of reading about Hi Points? The threads usually go something like:

"Hi, I'm new here, and saw a Hi Point in my budget. Are they good guns?"

"No, they're not good guns. They're cheap and ugly. The slide's hard to rack, and the recoil is unpleasant. Buy a proper used gun instead of a junky new one."

"But I wanted a new gun, and I can only spend $200! Are they reliable?"

"Yeah, pretty reliable. Go ahead, get it out of your system then."

Every firearm's manufacture has to start somewhere do you think that hi-point may head in a direction of Taurus with hicaps/bigger product line?
No, I think they build guns to a low price point, to try to get that part of the market. Just like Kia does with cars. They're basic and reliable, but nothing special. This way, they don't have to compete with the Big Boys.

I am not a hipoint lover or hater I actually owned a C9 way back and it was a good pistol. Then why don't you still own it? Because they're cheap and nasty, I bet. ;)

JoeMal
April 25, 2011, 02:26 PM
Maybe people aren't buying them? Nobody to complain about them if they aren't being sold

Japle
April 25, 2011, 02:33 PM
I think they build guns to a low price point, to try to get that part of the market. Just like Kia does with cars.

Exactly.

Rocketmedic
April 25, 2011, 02:47 PM
I really think that Hi-Point, Kel-Tec, and other 'bargain' companies are going to eclipse the classics (S&W, Ruger, Sig, etc) in terms of quality in the next quarter-century.

As has been pointed out before, a problematic $1000 pistol is 'picky' or 'fine-tuned' or 'match-grade'. A problematic $200 pistol is 'crap'. A reliable $200 pistol seems to be beyond the comprehension of people who have dropped an extra $1000 to have that really nice piece that cycles reliably.

For my money, Hi-Point did its job- it got me into shooting handguns recreationally. My next pistol will probably be an XD or a Glock, but that Hi-Point did its job quite well, and it's still on the nightstand until something better comes along (could be a while, with current economics!)

The Hi-Point on your nightstand beats the crap out of the Kimber in your LGS layaway bin.

MrWesson
April 25, 2011, 02:59 PM
Then why don't you still own it? Because they're cheap and nasty, I bet.


Tastes evolve I couldn't have that C9's ugly rubbing off on my other guns so I traded it for some primers awhile back. In all seriousness I will buy one if a cheapo crosses my path because I need a "glovebox gun". That being said I wont pay more than like $75 for it.

IMO its both popularity and reliability

Plenty of POS hipoints out there but behind every POS is a person to defend it(its is/was their pos after all).

Many dead reliable hipoints out there too.

People who own them usually dont have much bad to say(warranted or not).

People who haven't and wouldn't dare own one have plenty to say(warranted or not).

Fastcast
April 25, 2011, 03:53 PM
People who own them usually dont have much bad to say(warranted or not).

Mothers usually don't want to admit anything bad about their children either. Regardless of how terrible they truly are.

Most likely people here at THR are just getting tired of commenting on something of such little relevance. Answering questions for folks who are just looking for approval but then get defensive when they hear the truth, gets tiring I suppose.

Jim NE
April 25, 2011, 04:29 PM
I'd guess this thread will bring out some good ole bashing...

I'd have to agree.

As to Hi-Point moving up the food chain, I don't know about that. I think there will always be a market for very very inexpensive handguns. What I'm curious about is: where did all the OTHER low end makers go?? 25 years ago, there were probably close to a dozen brands at the very bottom end, now there's only Hi-Point (or are there others?)

NoobCannon
April 25, 2011, 04:41 PM
IMO, it may be the economy making people stop bashing Hi-Points. Why spend enough money to buy a used car on a gun when you can get one that's just as reliable as the high-end models(some cases, more), for considerably less money? That is if you can stomach the ugly. I personally wouldn't want a Hi-Point pistol, but I have been eyeing their carbines with great interest. I guess I'm picky about the ugly.

But seriously, at their price, you can buy two and STILL have enough cash to get gas on the way home.

Zerodefect
April 25, 2011, 05:03 PM
Naw, it's none of that.

January through April is dedicated to bashing Kimber. May through July we can bash Hipoints again.

USAF_Vet
April 25, 2011, 05:19 PM
Maybe people aren't buying them? Nobody to complain about them if they aren't being sold

I don't that is the case at all. Wandered into Buds Gun and Tackle just to browse, ended up putting down a deposit for a Hi Point JHP .45. Why did I have to put down a deposit? Because they can't keep them in stock. I don't know how many they order at any given time, but usually within days, a week at most, they have all been spoken for. The one .45 they had in stock was a wee bit overpriced for my tastes, and only because it had the laser sight on it, for which I have neither need nor desire.

Maybe there are reasons there is less bashing, such as:

A) the haters have bashed their heads against the wall hard enough to knock themselves out for awhile.

B) The haters have just given up their crusade to rid the world of Hi Points

C) The haters have realized and admitted that Hi Points, while always ugly as sin and heavy as a boat anchor, are fairly economical and reliable entry level hand guns.


As a Hi Point owner (something very few Hi Point Haters ever have been) I readily admit their faults while simultaneously sing their praises. I would readily recommend one, but I would represent them for what they are, which is, in my opinion, a butt ugly boat anchor of a gun that lacks hi round capacity (although the JHP.45 holds more than a standard 1911) that has a fantastic warranty. You point, squeeze, and expect the thing to go bang and very rarely get a different result.

NG VI
April 25, 2011, 05:39 PM
They work, I think people are coming to terms with the reality that they are very much functional pistols, I've even heard them described as pretty accurate by some.

They are hideous piles of zinc, true, but they do everything a reasonable person would expect of a low-cost service caliber pistol, and they have the best warranty out there, they'll just replace any pistol that breaks if it isn't an easy fix, no questions asked. That earns them a ton of points in my book, they know most of the people buying such an inexpensive gun aren't going to subject them to the kind of use that will result in warranty trips, and the same people are least able to afford to repair or replace a gun if something does go wrong.

I can't stand to look at them, but they do what they're supposed to and I have a tremendous amount of respect for the company.

eam3clm@att.net
April 25, 2011, 09:36 PM
I admit I do have a hi point in 380. It is also a reliable, but too big for a carry gun (comparing size and caliber). I also have two other 380s and all of them are picky about the ammo. My hipoint doesnt like win white box with its flat point but it loves wolf???????

FIVETWOSEVEN
April 25, 2011, 09:49 PM
They are cheap, heavy, bad trigger, and i can afford better. They have their place and its not with me.

bestseller92
April 25, 2011, 09:49 PM
I've never fired a HiPoint pistol, but my opinion is that, while I do not believe people should skimp and 'go cheap' where defensive firearms are concerned, I would much rather see a good citizen be armed with a Hi Point than totally unarmed.

rondog
April 25, 2011, 09:53 PM
The haters are still out there, they'll never go away. They're just filling up on their favorite flavor of KoolAid at the moment. Stand by, they'll be around. Several have come by already.

armoredman
April 25, 2011, 10:00 PM
I wouldn't mind trying a HiPoint 9mm. The company standing behind them 100% is a huge point in their favor.
... Just like Kia does with cars.
HEY! :cuss::fire:
I drive a Kia, have had three of them, and they've been dadgum good cars!
So :neener: thbbbbt!!:neener:

StrikeFire83
April 25, 2011, 10:02 PM
HiPoint firearms give poor people the ability to defend themselves and their families with something MUCH BETTER than the Bryco/Jennings garbage that was available at a similar (relative) price point 20 years ago.

Nothing wrong with that in my book.

bestseller92
April 25, 2011, 10:40 PM
+1 on what StrikeFire said. I actually do have some interest in a HiPoint carbine. Id like to at least try one out.

Jed Carter
April 26, 2011, 05:54 AM
$200 for a Hipoint, how about $150 max, or maybe $250 for a S&W Sigma instead. I work too hard for my paychecks to throw it away on a pistol that shoots, carries and handles as poorly as this. You can build a house with POS tools, but I would rather not. I have shot the Hipoint 9mm, and the owner decided to get another handgun, tried to trade it for a Taurus revolver and the gunshop offered $30 on the Hipoint, good investment, not at all. I realize that many cannot afford much, I have been fortunate. I would get a used pistol or revolver first, if you "need" a gun right now, there are fair pump shot guns in the Hipoint price point, although the 18" shotgun might not weigh quite as much.

bestseller92
April 26, 2011, 07:07 AM
At around $300-325 new (if you shop around on the auction sites), I consider the Ruger P95 9mm to be a superb value in a self defense pistol. I've had one since 1998 and it has been 100% reliable.

sarduy
April 26, 2011, 08:07 AM
i belive the hate is still there.... but it's better to a hipoint than nothing at all. some people can't affort to pay $200-300 for a handgun instead they get a used hp for $80 and a box of ammo for $20 leaving the extra $100-200 to pay for their bills. i have the same respect for a man that owns a hp or a colt-1911.

Rocketmedic
April 26, 2011, 08:30 AM
Of course the shop offered $30- they sent it back to Hi-Point and sold it for $150 or so. Easiest profit possible.

makarovnik
April 26, 2011, 08:36 AM
The prices have gone up over the years so they must be better than they used to be ;)

I too am tired of the endless Hi-Point threads.

G.barnes
April 26, 2011, 04:21 PM
Everyone says buy a sigma or a used mak or a Taurus. If you read tons of people complain about the horrid trigger in the sigma you have to order mak ammo online no Wally world prices and I'm not a huge fan of a lot of the brands that make mak ammo. Taurus has as many guns go back for being defective semi and revolvers. I've owned two hi points and neither ever had a problem I've owned two Taurus that both had issues. I look at it like this there are more than enough companies manufacturing guns that everyone can buy what they like and shouldn't worry about other peoples purchases.

JR47
April 26, 2011, 04:40 PM
At the lowest common denominator, a gun should be reliable, reasonably accurate, and durable. Despite the wisdom of the Internet Commandos, the High Point actually meets these criteria. Pretty much anything else is OPINION, and we all what that most closely resembles.

The High Point is NOT a CCW gun. Yet, neither is a S&W .500 Magnum with an 8" barrel. Does that make it bad?

I agree with the overriding opinion that a gun in the hand is a lot better than a gun on layaway.

The "great deals on used guns" are becoming harder and harder for many to find. The people looking to spend as little as possible aren't usually the most experienced in the art of examining a used handgun, or even in valuing a used handgun. Buying new, for them, is a better deal.

Pietro Beretta
April 26, 2011, 04:44 PM
Some people report that they are great firearms that never fail to feed. Other people have nothing but problems. I have had mixed issues with mine, but im not going to complain for a 150$ gun. Hell this was a gift given to me. I would never buy one, but I still haven't sold the one I have either. I will say I never shoot it anymore, I just have other guns I like more. I would not rely on it, but then again its one of those guns that if something were to ever happen to it, you wouldn't be heartbroken. If I hear someone talking about maybe buying one, I tell them save a 100 more dollars and buy something with a little bit nicer feel used.

AmEngRifles
July 21, 2011, 12:44 AM
I took one out one night for kicks. A buddy dared me. I waited until it was dark so my friends wouldn't see me leaving the house with her. We didn't go to any of the local hot spots where all my friends hang out. Just a nice dark field out in the country with a case of beer. I tell ya, she got better and better looking as the night went on. Hiccup. Excuse me. I did have an emergency brown bag with me in case any of my buddies had the same idea on using on that field, but never happened. Not sure how she would have reacted if I had to slip that bag on, over my head, not hers. Oh the shame.

She was a bit stiff and a little frigid at first, but once I figured out where to put my finger correctly, she warmed right up. Actually think she was enjoying it! :-)

Anyway, when it was all done and finished, she cleaned up quickly and thanked me for a good time. And I had managed to shoot my loads all over the place.

Don't let anybody tell you an ugly date can't be fun!

vellocet
July 21, 2011, 08:41 PM
Don't worry, until zinc becomes a real valuable metal you will hear hate for the high-point series of pistols. I still plan to buy a 9mm carbine if I can find one. Funny about that. I want a non-pre bubbad gun. SOG? Should have got one a few years ago.

FIVETWOSEVEN
July 21, 2011, 08:51 PM
The High Point is NOT a CCW gun. Yet, neither is a S&W .500 Magnum with an 8" barrel. Does that make it bad?

One is used for personal defense against bears or novelty while the other is mean't for personal defense against humans. It may not be intended for carry but its always nice when it can be used as such.

USAF_Vet
July 22, 2011, 09:37 AM
It may not be intended for concealed carry but its always nice when it can be used as such.


Fixed that for you. I have no problem carrying my Hi Point. Won't have a problem CC'ing this winter, either, once I get my CPL.

1911Tuner
July 22, 2011, 06:01 PM
Hey! As my old pal Forrest Gump so eloquently put it:

"Ugly is as ugly does."

The ones I've seen have worked fine for the most part, and when they didn't...the problem was usually traced straight to the magazine.

Hi-Points provide an inexpensive way to have an emergency gun in the trunk or the tool box...or several stashed at strategic locations around the homestead. They're offered in serious calibers, and once proven for function...they'll serve the intended purpose just fine.

Not really a pistol that I'd want for a lot of hard use, though many have done that with'em...but for they're perfectly capable of savin' ol' skinny if push comes to push hard.

Cards81fan
July 22, 2011, 06:25 PM
Every firearm's manufacture has to start somewhere do you think that hi-point may head in a direction of Taurus with hicaps/bigger product line?


I don't think that is the way they want to, or should, go. The pistols and carbines are all based on the same design, and it's very inexpensive and relatively proven. Nothing against them at all, but that's the money maker for them: inexpensive and serviceable. Anything more complex is like a losing proposition for them.

I tried to find an article I read that talked about the company and interviewed the owner (IIRC), but a Google news search of "Hi-Point Firearms" returns a lot of stories about a lot of different crimes ;)

chhodge69
July 22, 2011, 06:31 PM
ok, you called me a slacker so I better get to work...

I hate my hi-point! I hate it because it's ugly, it jams, it's unsafe and it's heavy and because I was a dum@$$ to buy it in the first place and because my conscience won't allow me to sell such a piece of crap. It takes up room in my safe and does me no good. I want my $100 back and the time it took to write this.

USAF_Vet
July 22, 2011, 06:54 PM
I'll buy it from you. What caliber is it?

X-Rap
July 22, 2011, 09:42 PM
I always keep one in my boat






















In case I loose my anchor;)

Onmilo
July 23, 2011, 05:55 AM
<<<Still and always will hate Hi-Points.
Most of us haters just usually refrain from posting in threads about these guns.

RevDerb
July 23, 2011, 09:50 AM
I wouldn't mind trying a HiPoint 9mm. The company standing behind them 100% is a huge point in their favor.

HEY! :cuss::fire:
I drive a Kia, have had three of them, and they've been dadgum good cars!
So :neener: thbbbbt!!:neener:
I've had 5 Kia's between my wife and I. Better fit and finish than most mid-point priced American made autos. The 10 yr/100,000 mile warranty initially brought me into the fold. go figure!

USAF_Vet
July 23, 2011, 01:25 PM
I've had 5 Kia's between my wife and I. Better fit and finish than most mid-point priced American made autos. The 10 yr/100,000 mile warranty initially brought me into the fold. go figure!


If you bought a quality vehicle instead of a junker Kia, you wouldn't have had to buy five of them.

SnowBlaZeR2
July 23, 2011, 01:36 PM
I've had 5 Kia's between my wife and I. Better fit and finish than most mid-point priced American made autos. The 10 yr/100,000 mile warranty initially brought me into the fold. go figure!
Which Kia is better "fit and finish" than a "mid-point priced American".

Oh, and High Points are disgusting. :)

Deltaboy
July 23, 2011, 07:45 PM
Hi Points get the job done and are ugly as sin! I love my HP -45 it does what I want.

Ash
July 24, 2011, 08:31 AM
Go to a mechanics forum and ask about Pittsburg, Great Neck, Duralast, Chinese Stanley, GM, or other socket sets/wrenches sold by Harbor Freight, Autozone, Advanced, or Walmart.

A Hi Point is like a cheap set of Indian wrenches. They are ugly, cheap, and heavy. That they work on a car is good enough for people who buy them. But folks who buy Indian or Chinese wrenches are not professionals nor do they use them extensively.

The no-name real cheapo Chinese tools are crap and break - much like Lorcin/Corbra or Bryco/Jiminez. But some of these are ugly but do work. Think of them as Hi Point. Some are polished and work just fine, like Taurus. But mechanics tend to avoid them.

The Kia is not a good example. They are not made cheaply. There is no car example that works because cheaply-made cars are junk. Though if you think about it, imagine the Yugo returning and becoming popular. Firearms by their rather simple nature allows for a much higher degree of cheapness and remain functioning. The Hi Point is cheaply-made. They are blow-back, single-action striker fired weapons that are not a good idea to keep cocked-and-locked because of the safety on them. But they work fine for the most part. That Indian wrench will work fine for the most part. Folks buy them and like them. Others have not. They get lumped with the other junk pistols because they went through the same bewildering chain of ownership before settling on Hi Point (Stallard, Beemiller, Haskell, Iberia, etc). Some of the earlier incarnations were real junk (I recall a real POS Stallard).

For me, I have also gotten tired of really posting about them - ironic given the length of this post. The vast majority of Hi Point postings are started by very-low post members - and this is across the boards - to the point that I suspect a large percentage of these kinds of posts are started by Hi Point plants and "free advertising." I noticed this a decade ago at Gunboards and have seen it many places. Yet I make no accusations here on this forum lest anyone think I am pointing a finger. I am not. In any case, you want to like your Harbor Freight tools, fine by me. I suppose I'm just not all that interested in talking about them.

gvf
July 24, 2011, 09:31 AM
Bash away those who wish. (I don't mean here necessarily but anywhere).

I don't have one but I hear they are good.
Look, here's life in the Big City: the people who need to CCW a gun the most are often poor and live in awful, crime-infested neighborhoods. They can't go for the Wilson Combat or even the Sig.

So these guns, and a few other well-made "cheapies" are the only house on the street for some people who really need daily protection.

It irritates me when I hear of lower cost guns that may not be great looking but work fine put down. It's arrogant.

Ash
July 24, 2011, 10:33 AM
I think "Well Made" is a stretch. They are "good enough" but would not say "well made." They are cheaply made pistols that work. Most are purchased by people with a limited knowledge of firearms.

Considering that most people who own one have a smart phone and the associated smart phone cell phone plan, the reality is that they could afford a better pistol but choose not to purchase one.

And there are better pistols than a Hi Point. That said, folks can like them. But many Hi Point folks carry a chip on their shoulder every bit as significant as those who look down on them. "Hey, look at my Hi Point, it can do just as well as your expensive pistol, so there!"

tlmkr38
July 24, 2011, 02:29 PM
They are good inexpensive guns that fill a need. I have had 2 of them. Both brain dead reliable ( tried to make them jam and couldn't) Now that being said, will they hold up to firing 200-1000 rounds a month every month? Probably not... Are they designed for that? no...

Most people who buy those want a gun for home defense or something similar and honestly are not "gun nuts". they don't shoot alot but they want something that will fire when they need to. Heck the people I bought mine from probably shot them 4-5 times a year... And a hi Point did that just fine...

If all the bashers will remember the first Smith and Wesson 380 that came out about 10-15 yrs ago the magazines lauded the greatness of them. They were built just the same as a Jenings, Zinc pot metal.. But, since it was Smith it was better even though Smith said they were good for about 2500-3000 rounds tops.... But, it was a Smith....

918v
July 24, 2011, 04:12 PM
Maybe there's less bashing because people are more accepting of inherent cheapness than ever before. Everyone is cheapening their products and people continue buying them. Then they rationalize their decision by posting on the Internet hoping to find some positive reinforcement. Pretty soon AngelSoft will come out with a gun made out of recycled toilet paper rolls wrapped with tin foil and people will buy it, then post about how it is more accurate than they are.

jimk0512
July 24, 2011, 04:43 PM
I don't own one. I have heard from people who own one that they work. They go bang, and the bullet ends up near where you aim.

I think everyone who can legally own a handgun should own one. Right to keep and bear arms. An armed society is a polite society. I would rather see someone owning a Hi Point instead of nothing at all.

MCgunner
July 24, 2011, 05:06 PM
I don't hate 'em. I just don't want one, Rugers are affordable to me, and I like Rugers. :D Lotsa hate for Ruger autos on these boards, though, so you Hi Point guys, don't feel alone. Folks say my Rugers are ugly. See, I like Hi Points because they're uglier than Rugers and I can just point to THEM and say, well.......:D

... Just like Kia does with cars.

Well, I'd consider a Kia....but I really prefer Toyota. Hell, all cars are made of plastic and tin anymore. :rolleyes: Might as well own one that'll last 300K miles. :D Now, I'd rather have a steel or steel/alloy firearm than a zinc gun, but that's just me. I own a zinc gun, but it's just a .22 and not a serious defense gun.

BUT, I'm sure Hi Points have merit to some beyond the cheap price. I could make reference to anchors, but I'll control myself. :D Seriously, don't worry about what I think if you like shooting the things. All I have is opinions and they're like...well...everyone has one. It's YOU that has to be happy with the gun. And, I guess, ugly guns need love, too. :D

918v
July 24, 2011, 05:53 PM
I would rather see someone owning a Hi Point instead of nothing at all.

I'm going to buy a HiPoint for home defense. That way an intruder will have a fair chance against my 1911.

Ash
July 24, 2011, 08:38 PM
918v,

I own, collect, and shoot store-brand rifles - particularly Western Field and Revelation rifles. IN the 1960's and early 1970's, the basic rifle still had a polished blue, iron sights, and a walnut stock (even if it had pressed-checkering).

Those rifles today would be considered middle-grade rifles and would be more than $800 each. A Remington 710, had it appeared at the same time made by Remington, would have been snubbed in a way that made a Post 1964 Winchester seem well-loved.

We have greatly accepted cheapened equipment. Some have even swallowed the cheapness as improvements.

MCgunner
July 24, 2011, 11:39 PM
Polished blue and wood have weaknesses. I like my stainless/polymer Remington M7 .308, can be rained, snowed, sleeted upon and sheds it like neoprene. Stock can't warp with dryness or wetness, a good thing for a gun that's sighted in in Corpus Christi and used for hunting in New Mexico. Yes, in many ways, stainless/polymer IS an improvement. I had a wood stock on my 10/22 and bought a Hogue overmolded stock for it, big improvement IMHO. Ditto for the polymer I put on my Savage 110 to replace the birch. the fact that it was free floated also helps shave a half inch off the groups. I prefer the full dipped camo/plastic stock finish on my Mossberg 500 waterfowler to the Revelation 310 I had, too. It's much more rugged in salt marsh conditions. Traditional ain't always better, even walnut, not if you actually USE the firearm.

But, the topic is high point. :barf:...oh, sorry....:D

918v
July 25, 2011, 12:33 AM
You missed the point. It's not the choice of materials. It's the choice of quality of the materials. There is a difference between a Model 7 synthetic and a 710. There is a difference between HiPoint's potmetal construction and a quality manufacturer's choice of aluminum/steel/polymer. This isn't about traditional. It's about cheap crap.

1911Tuner
July 25, 2011, 07:54 AM
No argument that Hi-Point pistols are substandard when compared to higher quality and higher priced guns. They're not very impressive. They are, however...functional for the most part, and as long as a given pistol will fire 10 times in a row without stopping...it'll probably save your life in all but the most grave of circumstances.

That's the whole point, after all. No? To market a pistol that nearly everybody can afford so that even those lacking the wherewithal to buy a Les Baer Custom or Wilson Combat CQB can have an effective means to defend themselves.

Many years ago, Rohm/RG revolvers sold for about 15 bucks. Near the end of their run, they were selling for 50...but in the beginning, they were much cheaper. They were also absolutely the worst junk that had ever been perpetrated on the American market. Most RGs would start to give problems in less than a hundred rounds.

But...

They weren't meant to be fired a hundred rounds. They were intended to be there for emergencies. Cheap life insurance that would fill a niche for those less fortunate. If a given RG .38 would fire 5 times...it could well mean the difference between raped and unsullied....alive or dead.

Today, the Hi-Point fills the same niche.

Ash
July 25, 2011, 11:20 AM
"Traditional ain't always better, even walnut, not if you actually USE the firearm."

Hey, I actually USE my firearms.

Mine have been used for decades.

Matte black, no irons, plastic - er - synthetic stocks, these things may be your cup of tea. Fine by me. I like my walnut, polished blue, iron sights. I use them, and have done so for a very long time.

Odd, isn't it, that good double shotguns are still largely without synthetic furniture and matte finishes - including those that actually get used.

Like what you will. But your rifle would have been rejected out-of-hand three decades ago by men who used their firearms. The 710 would have been ignored completely. Are you fine with a lower-level of manufacture as long as accuracy remains? Okay, fine by me. There's plenty of room for that. Accuracy trumps all things, and for many that is all that is required. They are easily satisfied with, indeed prefer, features that lower costs. It does not change the fact that standards of manufacturing have gone way down.

By the way, my rifles remain accurate regardless the weather. They are properly bedded, have good glass (I like the Nikon Monarch scopes personally), have properly-adjusted triggers, good mounts and rings (mine sport old Redfield twist-on mounts with steel rings that have been properly lapped). They are built to a higher standard than modern equivalents. And, they really get used.

If you enjoyed reading about "Noticed less Hipoint hate/bashing" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!