Need Opinions on Uberti Cattleman


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Foto Joe
April 25, 2011, 07:25 PM
I've given up on my goal of having a Uberti Schofield after the third one failed (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=589494). I'm wondering about replacing it with one or more Cattleman revolvers but before I do, I want to try to make sure I'm not diving into the shallow end of the pool again.

This gun will be used with Black Powder cartridges in 45 Colt or 44-40 and maybe both if I get two. I have no choice on brand right now other than Uberti as this is a replacement for a bad one or three.

Does the Cattleman have a SAA style firing pin on the hammer or does it use a transfer bar ala Taurus Gaucho?

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towboat_er
April 25, 2011, 07:38 PM
It has no transfer bar. Just like the originals.

GENTLEMAN OF THE CHARCOAL
April 25, 2011, 09:23 PM
The 1858 .44 Cattleman's Carbine is one of the slickest handling, one of the smoothest handling firearms that it is possible for a man to get his hands on. Spend a little money on it and get the innard's polished and hardened and the trigger pull set (sort of light) and maybe change barrels and make sure everything is all proofed up and then load her up to .44-40. She'll carry the mail. I know; I own 3 of them. What do you need a transfer bar for? Scared? Don't trust yourself? Then buy your meat at the supermarket and carry a cell phone so you can call 911. Or do like oprah winfrey and carry a life guard whistle or just vomit all over them when they want to hurt you or want to take your life. This ain't Sturm and Ruger, son....

Foto Joe
April 26, 2011, 01:14 PM
What do you need a transfer bar for? Scared? Don't trust yourself? Then buy your meat at the supermarket and carry a cell phone so you can call 911. Or do like oprah winfrey and carry a life guard whistle or just vomit all over them when they want to hurt you or want to take your life.

GOTC, calm yourself, all I did was ask a question.;) I really don't want a gun that "has" a transfer bar, it's just too many moving parts and I've had enough problems with Uberti as it is.

Given the government has certain hoops it likes gun makers to jump through, I was worried that a transfer bar might be one of them for imports of SAA clones.

BHP FAN
April 26, 2011, 07:36 PM
The 1873 Colt design is replicated fairly faithfully, in a variety of finishes, It's a good, sturdy, workman-like gun.

http://www.uberti.com/firearms/single_action_cattleman.php

GENTLEMAN OF THE CHARCOAL
April 26, 2011, 09:55 PM
Sorry, FotoJoe. Thought you were speaking of the Uberti (Remington) 1858 .44 Cattleman's Carbine. If you were by any chance, they are good. My '47's, my '49's, and my carbines are all made by Uberti. Hell, they all shot pretty good right out of the box as far as working good and looking good and all. That is the only 3 models of Uberti I own although I have several of each. (I'm not interested in trying to own one of every gun somebody make's. I decided on what I wanted and what would best serve my needs and then made sure I had extras with plenty of spare parts and all). No problems with them on my end of town....

Foto Joe
April 27, 2011, 12:40 PM
I did get some clarification on the "transfer bar" question. I saw a video or somebody posted a pic somewhere that inadvertantly showed Uberti's method of "Safe Carry" for a fully loaded six-shooter. I'm pretty sure that the government does mandate something on this for imports. After all we're not bright enough to take care of ourselves are we?:cuss:

There is a modification to the hammer which Uberti did. Probably something like the "interupt" on Uberti Schofields that prevents the hammer from going full travel unless the trigger is fully depressed. Apparently Colt's original method of "Safe Carry" by placing the firing pin between the cartridge heads just wasn't good enough for those that protect us from ourselves.

Anyway, I've made my decision and it looks like both will be Cattleman with 7.5" barrels. One will be nickle in 45 Colt and the other will be blue in 44-40.

The blue one I think is in stock but I've been told by Uberti that the nickle one is "in transit". These are coming directly from Uberti as replacements so I'm kinda stuck on who I get them from. I think the nickle will be worth the wait.

arcticap
April 27, 2011, 02:11 PM
I'm pretty sure that the government does mandate something on this for imports. After all we're not bright enough to take care of ourselves are we?

It's to protect the U.S. gun industry and American jobs from foreign competition as well as folks from substandard or junk imported firearms. The government can't be expected to test all products so maybe they mandate a safety feature instead. The gov't. can't even keep the lead out of imported Chinese toys, crayons and kid's vinyl lunch bags. So can we blame them for not trusting the quality of imported firearms? :rolleyes:

PRM
April 27, 2011, 02:44 PM
I've been shooting Uberti revolvers since the 1970s. They make some good guns that are acceptable quality but may require some tweaking. I (personally)have had better luck out of the box with their black powder guns.

The two cartridge Uberti(s) I own are great shooters but came with problems.

1. Cimarron (Uberti) Lightning. This gun came new with a short firing pin. It would barely dent the primers. Cimarron offered to replace the part ~ but considering shipping cost and turn around time, I had a local gunsmith fabricate one and I was back in business in a couple of days.

2. Cimarron (Uberti) Bisley. This gun was a money pit and had to be completely rebuilt right out of the box. The cylinder had been so aggressively buffed during its final finish that it would not even lock up. That was replaced. Then internal springs began to fail. I wound up completely replacing all internal parts including the hammer assembly to get it right. Had to go with the old style hammer assembly through VTI Gun Parts.

Like I said once these guns were tweaked and re-worked ~ they have been great.

I know you can get a lemon with any brand ~ but, my Bisley definitely made its way through quality control at quitting time on a Friday.

From my experience: Cimarron, who is supposed to be the select of the Uberti line is not worth the extra cost. Good folks to deal with ~ but you are still getting a Uberti.

Uberti is a good entry level gun. They will never be a Colt (and I do own several of them). USFA is another top shelf SA, if you want to get into that price range. YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR.

If I understand your situation ~ this is an exchange. You may not have other options. Just check the guns out good when you get them.

BHP FAN
April 27, 2011, 06:57 PM
deleted ...

SAA
April 28, 2011, 01:42 AM
I'm a Colt guy who just recently bought an EMF Great Western ll Californian to devote to occasional trail CCW, and black powder when not carryin'.

I have to say I'm pretty impressed with the fit and finish of this Italian copy (Made by Pietta). It has a blued steel back strap and trigger guard, not brass, nice oiled walnut one-piece stocks, not stained bloody red, and a basic two-position base pin so there doesn't have to be any of that ridiculous, funky stuff on the hammer. Machined the rear of the base pin off and now it sits in the frame just like it does on a SAA.

Oh, and parts are no problem as most parts interchange with Colt SAA parts. In fact, I found out the bozo that had it before I got it had bulged the cylinder (he's mainly a bozo for not disclosing that fact in the sale) and a spare 2nd generation Colt SAA cylinder dropped right in and is timed close enough for my picky a**.

http://www.emf-company.com/store/pc/Standard-Grips-c136.htm

Might want to consider this model if you can pick up a used one at a good price, though at this point I see Uberti only left you with the option of getting another Uberti.:scrutiny:

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