Might be moving to Alaska


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grubbylabs
April 28, 2011, 03:07 PM
Another thread prompted me to ask since I am graduating and will probably be applying for a job in Alaska.

How do you handle the move if you are driving yourself? Will the Canadian Authorities have a come apart or will they allow me to carry all my guns with me. I only have two hand guns a few rifles and a couple of shot guns. I guess it really does not matter what the quantity is.

Any advise? Any one been through this before?

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griff383
April 28, 2011, 03:10 PM
Can I go with?

grubbylabs
April 28, 2011, 03:11 PM
How much money do you have and will you have a job? NO free loaders:D

mrbro
April 28, 2011, 03:14 PM
You may be able to ship the guns to yourself to be picked up when you arrive.

Sunray
April 28, 2011, 04:17 PM
Gets really cold in Alaska and men outnumber women by a very large margin. No day light in winter nor night in summer either. snicker.
"...will they allow me to carry all my guns with me..." Absolutely not.
Go here and scroll down to 'Option 1'. It's going to cost you $25 just to pass through. No limit to how many though.
If you have anything that is prohibited under our law, you cannot bring it with you. Prohibited doesn't just mean 'short barreled handguns'. .25 and .32 calibre handguns that aren't specifically exempt(high end .32 cal target pistols) are evil too.
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/fs-fd/visit-visite-eng.htm
The list of what firearms are evil is here. Includes rifle mags that hold more than 5 and handgun mags that hold more than 10. Either must be permanently pinned to their respective legal capacities to be allowed in. M1 Rifle clips and Lee-Enfield mags are exempt.
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/fs-fd/prohibited-prohibe-eng.htm
Don't even think about ignoring the whole thing either. First question you'll be asked at the border is, "Do you have any firearms?" Get caught BSing our Customs types and you'll be arrested, escorted to the border, turned over to your Homeland Security types and not allowed back in.

grubbylabs
April 28, 2011, 04:36 PM
Makes so happy to have such friendly neighbors to the north.


I know it gets cold, it gets cold here too. And I am not worried about the guy to gal ratio since my wife will be moving with me.

And the no day light will probably be fine since the winter is for working any way. Summer is for bug nets, skeeter dope and possibly even some fun.

So my assumption that I would not be able move my hand guns with me though the border is correct. I guess my only option for those and others that may qualify would be to ship them to an FFL for retrieval upon my arrival?

ArfinGreebly
April 28, 2011, 05:03 PM
It is my understanding that it is entirely legal to ship guns from yourself to yourself.

You would, of course, have to have a valid address at the other end.

If, for example, I were going to spend a month with a friend up there, I could ship a rifle to myself at his address.

At least this is my understanding.

whooboy
April 28, 2011, 05:23 PM
Go onto Canada's website. There is a way to transport guns through Canada. People do it all the time. You have to fill out some forms and when entering Canada, declare the weapons with the forms. They will inventory the weapons and seal them. When you leave Canada, you will have to stop so they can complete the paper work and remove the seals. I have a friend who hunts in Alaska and takes his RV up there with his guns. I takes a little effort and patience but it can be done.

grubbylabs
April 28, 2011, 07:46 PM
Does he take hand guns? Or other Banned guns?

hirundo82
April 28, 2011, 07:50 PM
It is my understanding that it is entirely legal to ship guns from yourself to yourself.

You would, of course, have to have a valid address at the other end.

Not necessarily; UPS is glad to hold a package for you at their hub (within reason; they're not going to let it take up space in their warehouse for months).

grubbylabs
April 28, 2011, 07:55 PM
What about powder and primers and the such. I don't have a tone of ammo but I am just shy of a 1000 rounds right now not including 22 ammo.

Aaron Baker
April 28, 2011, 10:08 PM
You don't say where you're moving.

Are you sure you can drive there?

I'm not trying to be a jerk, but when I lived in the bush, I heard stories of people not realizing that you can't drive everywhere in Alaska. They had planned to drive to Dillingham, and were surprised to learn that they had to fly.

You can mail long guns to yourself. At least in the bush, even if you don't have a PO box yet, mailing things to yourself "general delivery" is acceptable. They'll hold your mail at the post office until you get there. If there are only 1100 PO boxes for the whole town and one post office, you won't have problems doing this. But if you're moving to Anchorage, I wouldn't recommend it.

So give us some more info.

Aaron

jim in Anchorage
April 29, 2011, 04:34 AM
Ship em to me, I'll keep em safe:D
Applying for a job and getting a job are two different things. Start with the job and worry about the guns later. IF you get the job you may be able to ship them to your employers address.

Cryogaijin
April 29, 2011, 06:15 AM
Don't drive, if you can at all help it. Sell your car, buy a used vehicle up here. Keep in mind, you only want to keep the car as long as you are up here.

Be prepared to spend a couple nights in a hotel before you find a place. (I recommend staying at the Residence Inn. Best hotel in town. :)

You can ship guns up to yourself just fine. If you have a reservation at the hotel, that counts as a valid address. Otherwise you can ship to a FFL up here. Gunrunners is nearby to the Residence Inn, and costs $35 a gun to receive.

grubbylabs
April 29, 2011, 02:03 PM
I will be applying for a job as a high school teacher in an area that I can drive to. We have to be near a large enough hospital that my wife can find a job as well. We plan on staying at least 5 years hopefully longer so taking our cars up is not a problem.

I did realize that you can't drive every where up there, my wife lived there as a child so we have a small idea of what moving up there entails. Here family drove there and back with 9 people in a 1979 extra cab ford. 3 of them were just out of or still in diapers. Talk about a family road trip.

I am sure that for many that is a big surprise that they have to pay to fly places instead of drive, and I could not imagine the shock on their faces when they realize just how much of their stuff they will be leaving behind.

KodiakBeer
April 29, 2011, 02:28 PM
Nobody ever listens to me when I tell them this, but the smart thing to do is to put your guns in the trunk or a trailer, then put your car on the Alaska ferry system in Bellingham, WA, and take the inside passage to Juneau, then change ferries and continue up to Valdez or Whittier.
When you consider the cost of gas and hotels, it's competitive with driving through Canada. Plus, you get to take what's virtually a cruise ship tour through the inside passage - 1500 miles of splendor that you can't get to by car. You'll see some quaint little towns, whales, glaciers, mountains and everything Alaska is famous for, all from a lounge chair and with your own cabin, a bar, restaurants, etc.

You can check out the schedules and make reservations here: http://www.dot.state.ak.us/amhs/index.shtml

grubbylabs
April 29, 2011, 04:29 PM
Wow KodiakBeer that is a great idea. I did not think about it, I bet my kids would go nuts over that. Unless they spend the whole time chumming fish:D. I would almost feel bad for them, but I would be too busy enjoying the scenery. Plus the advantage of maintaining possession of my firearms the whole way.

I will be visiting before I accept a job offer just to see what the place is like and then if I do accept a job I will come back to set up housing and all the other fun stuff.

NorthBorder
April 29, 2011, 04:31 PM
You can take your long guns through Canada. Just google up the Canadian form CAFC 909. You can probably complete it on line and present it to Canada Customs. Don't even show up at the border with handguns. On the U.S. side you have to declare them, also. Google up CBP form 4457. You can download it and declare all your firearms, their descriptions and serial numbers, as well as other valuables like cameras, computers, and even jewelry if you wish. When you arrive at the border go to the U.S. side with the declaration. They will clear all the serial numbers that you give them, stamp the 4457, return it to you, and you are on your way. Best of all it is free and the form is valid as long as you own the property listed. You keep the form(s) (in case you have more than one). CBP doesn't keep a record of the form or the property. This is NOT a back door registration. But it is the law.

Shadow 7D
April 29, 2011, 04:45 PM
Make it easy on yourself, and just avoid Canada if you can, I had a friend who is probably still wanted on gunrunning charges from a PCS move that he chose to drive up instead of taking the ferry. They take umbrage at blackpowder revolvers and NSN shotguns etc.

Point is, he lost his family guns, quite a few, and was told by the judge that if he stayed it would be a VERY long time before he saw his case tried, so he bailed and left Canada.

Larry E
April 30, 2011, 12:10 AM
Yup, from what I've heard from people who've driven to AK it can be interesting. The Canadian authorities have NO sense of humor at all, nice enough people probably, but take their jobs VERY seriously. All Americans pack guns and like to shoot people you know! :uhoh:

The Alaska State Ferry from Bellingham would be my choice, and since it's pretty much right on the way you could stop at Kesselring Gun Shop between Mt Vernon and Bellingham on WA highway 9. Maybe not you might be tempted to buy something.... :D One of my favorite places when I lived in the Seattle area.

KodiakBeer
April 30, 2011, 12:19 AM
I just noticed they've added a direct run to Whittier.

In May the MV Kennicott will begin direct cross-gulf service from Bellingham, WA to the port of Whittier, just 60 miles south of Anchorage. The cross-gulf run will stop in Ketchikan, Juneau and Yakutat for connections throughout the system with continuing service to Kodiak Island.

Malamute
April 30, 2011, 12:30 AM
I'd just about bet that the guy that lost his family guns didnt follow the rules in some way. No, the Canadian customs people don't have much sense of humor, but if you follow their rules (it is their country after all) they are not too bad to deal with in my experience. I believe they hate for Americans to try to tell them how screwed up their laws are and how things ought to be, or try to claim what rights we should have in their country. Act like a courteous, respectful guest, and they have been plenty easy to deal with for me. Act like a heathen (in their eyes) and they can make your life miserable. Try to sneak things in and get caught, you can truly be in misery.


I've driven up and back several times, I thought it was a blast! I camped along the way. I declared my guns at the border, had zero problems coming or going (yes, I declared them on the US side before leaving also) other than one time they asked to see them, which I showed them, and they said "OK, have a nice trip". They each time asked if I owned any handguns, to which I replied yes, they then asked "where are they", and I produced the shipping receipt (from myself, to myself in care of a friend), to which they looked at it and seemed happy enough.

I believe you can take 2000 rds of ammo, a thousand primers, 2 kilos of powder per person. Check with the Canadian Firearms people, they have a decent website.

From all I've heard, the Canadians in western Canada are easier to deal with regarding guns than the eastern Canadians. If I were driving from somewhere in the eastern US, I'd get to western Canada before entering.

jgiehl
April 30, 2011, 04:27 AM
Fairbanks, Anchorage, Kodiak, Palmer????
Where to?

Cryogaijin
April 30, 2011, 06:37 AM
Agree with Kodiak. Take the Ferry.

jim in Anchorage
April 30, 2011, 07:29 AM
If you're going through Canada make sure you have a birth certificate [no Obama jokes please] and no DWI's [no Bush jokes either].
I made that trip 3 times and no question #4 would be on the ferry. The Yukon is a mighty lonely place and a simple car breakdown could turn into $$$$$$ and waiting weeks for parts.

grubbylabs
April 30, 2011, 09:06 PM
Depends, I google the school and look at the comunity on a map. If it is accecable on a map I will apply, if it looks like a six week trip on mules in the summer and a 4 month trip on sled in the winter I don't think I will send them an application.

Its just an idea we are kicking around right now. Our oldest child starts school next fall, so if we are going to move someplace like that then now is as good a time as any to do it.

We both like the wilderness, camping, hunting and fishing life style. We try to be mostly self reliant, so I think the only bummer would be the lack of garden we would have, or the expense of housing. Our market has tanked like many others and I bet it has not up there. But again something we have to look at.

As most of you know there is a lot to consider when you are going to uproot 2small children and a wife and move across a country.

KodiakBeer
April 30, 2011, 09:37 PM
Lack of a garden? Have you ever seen pictures of those 100 pound cabbages and 900 pound pumpkins at the state fair? 20 -22 hours of daylight does great things to a lot of vegetables.
Much of Alaska has warmer winters than Idaho. Even the interior where you do get extreme winters, has gorgeous summers. I've never known anyone who has regretted moving to Alaska.

Giant Mutant Alaskan veggies: http://www.gadling.com/2007/07/16/giant-mutant-like-vegetables-at-alaska-state-fair/

DM~
April 30, 2011, 10:32 PM
I lived in Alaska for 25 years and over those years i drove the ALCAN hiway 13 times... I took the ferry a couple times too.

IF the weather is good, the ferry is great, if the weather is bad (more times than not in SE Ak..) the trip can be bad to horrible!!! Cold, lots of rain and low visability!

It is NOT dark in all of Alaska all winter, only in the most northern part of the state.

The giant cabbages ect that are grown there, are for SHOW, not for eating. BUT, you can have a garden... You are just restricted in what will grow there, and you have to deal with the moose ect.. getting into EVERYTHING! One moose will clean an entire garden out in one night, and there's plenty of them around all summer to do just that!

I would drive there with a decent vehicle, and you better take plenty of $$ with you! Until you learn how everything works there, it's going to cost you a LOT of money to live there.

How ever tough you think the move will be, it will be 100 times tougher than you think!

DM

Cryogaijin
May 1, 2011, 03:12 AM
Plonk yourself down in the Rogers Park neighborhood of Anchorage (The Stephen's park appartments have openings, 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms) That's reasonably close to providence hospital, University of Alaska Anchorage, and in the Roger's Park school district. (One of the better school districts in Anchorage.)

Oh, and it is right next door to the Marriott Residence Inn I mentioned. . .

jgiehl
May 1, 2011, 10:05 AM
Fairbanks is nice, there's TONS of outdoors activities to be had. Drive 10 minutes outside of town in just about any direction and there's hiking, LOADS of berries to be picked, Many many fish to be caught. Hunting in the fall (I don't hunt in winter). The only downside here anymore seems to be smoke in the summer from all the fires.

But whichever direction you get to come up here, GO DOWN TO OR COME UP FROM VALDEZ!!! It is absolutely gorgeous and worth the trip.

KodiakBeer
May 1, 2011, 01:14 PM
I may be prejudiced, but I find Kodiak to be the best of Alaska.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRaHIVUnID0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Et-a6lYkwOQ

ball3006
May 1, 2011, 03:10 PM
You'll freeze your ass off........chris3

KodiakBeer
May 1, 2011, 04:10 PM
I think last winter we had a few days in January where it got down to about 12 degrees at night. That was as cold as it got, and that is a pretty normal winter here, and in much of Alaska. The "average" winter day (here) is about 35 to 38 degrees during the day and perhaps 25 to 28 at night. Winter precipitation is rain as often as it's snow.

Just flying to Anchorage from here (300 miles?) is a shock during winter. It might be 40 degrees here, and 10 below zero in Anchorage.

Alaska is a big place. The interior and the north are extremely cold. The coast is pretty mild. It's not at all unusual for the state to have a 100 degree temperature difference between say, Ketchikan and Barrow, on the same winter day. The Aleutians get over a hundred inches of rain a year, while some places in the interior get less than 10.

There are several Alaska's and they each have a different climate, different wildlife and a different "feel".

Malamute
May 1, 2011, 04:49 PM
I always enjoyed seeing the overlay map that showed the relative size of AK compared to the lower 48.


http://www.dced.state.ak.us/dca/lga/Ak_on_US.htm

General Geoff
May 1, 2011, 04:52 PM
There are several Alaska's and they each have a different climate, different wildlife and a different "feel".

This is what happens when you live in a state that's larger than most countries. :D

KodiakBeer
May 1, 2011, 05:07 PM
A true story.
When Alaska was being debated for statehood, a Texas senator stood up and (jokingly) argued that Alaska should be made into two states so that Texas could remain the largest state.
The Alaska delegate stood up and explained that if Alaska was two states, then Texas would be the 3rd largest state since both halves would still be much larger than Texas.

Cosmoline
May 1, 2011, 05:12 PM
Canadians let you go through with certain hunting rifles, as defined by Canadian law. The only safe bet is to ship your weapons to yourself as suggested. The drive is very very very long, as folks have noted. I just had my car, full of my stuff, barged up from Seattle. Worked really well.

There are a lot of myths about this state. As KB notes, the place is huge. You can spend a lifetime here and see only a fraction of it. The weather is very different from region to region. Southeast tends to be like coastal BC, south central tends to have moderate winters and very long sunny summers. Western tends to have somewhat colder winters and is bush. The slope and interior can get brutally cold, but also very sunny in the summer. Plus the cold is different in the interior. It's very dry cold, so you can do way more at -40 f. than you would have thought possible.

Gardening is very popular here and we have a thriving local agriculture. I bought mass quantities of cabbage, potatoes, char, kale, onions, carrots and such from various Mat-Su farmers last fall and I JUST NOW unthawed the last of the stew I made from it. That food fed me lunches and dinners from September to May, and most of it was locally grown. The potatoes and green veges in particular are sublime. Dozens of varieties of potatoes, mustard greens of incredible intensity, cabbages that make fantastic home-made kraut. And onions so delicious they're like candy. Not to mention the rutabaga that redefines rutabaga! You don't see this stuff in the lower 48 because the shipping costs are too high, but I can never eat a lowly russet spud again. Not now that I've had locally grown purple vikings and yellow finns!

Two sample trips to the farmers market:

http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/10123_1238607613471_1477701250_674173_5772440_n.jpg

http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/39986_1573595227952_1477701250_1529680_1744532_n.jpg

For the complete Alaskan experience, you have your own moose and/or caribou meat ready to be cooked with that stuff.

The housing markets up here are distinct, and we never had the mortgage boom/bust seen in the lower 48. Prices have always been high, particularly when you try to find housing in southeast or in the remote areas. Land is pretty inexpensive though. I've just learned how to live rough and rent smart. Right now I'm living right next to a fish store so I shave about $300 a month off the rent in an otherwise excellent neighborhood. The fish is a side benefit. If you've never had raw Alaska grown oysters you're really missing something special.

Don't discount Anchorage, even though everyone here loves to hate it. It actually has a ton of park land and wilderness areas nearby. I've seen more bear and moose here than I ever did out in Willow. And I survive year round without a car.

zstephens13
May 1, 2011, 05:15 PM
When I moved here I had to ship my guns to a dealer. If you are moving close to the Mat-Su Valley (Wasilla, Palmer, etc) Mat-Su Tactical on the Palmer-Wasilla Highway will recieve firearms for $10. I deal with him often. I'm not sure about primer and powder, but you can bring 5,000 rounds of ammunition over the border.

FYI: May 20th will be my first full year in Alaska. Advice: Find another job. :) I found it to be much colder than Kodiak Bear explained. My power bill said average temp in Dec, Jan, Feb and Mar was 13 degrees.

We have winds here in the Valley upwards of 90mph. Oklahoma? Get in the torando shelter! Florida? Prepare for a hurricane!
Alaska? Business as usual.

KodiakBeer
May 1, 2011, 05:49 PM
You can spend a lifetime here and see only a fraction of it

That is so true, and that fact even evades many people who live here. You can only get to a fraction of the state by road. Heck, you can't even drive to the state capitol which is a city that is at least marginally cosmopolitan. I've been all over since my first ten years were on coast guard cutters. There are some mighty strange little towns out there in the bush, and some of them don't even have a bar!

There are some pluses to living off the road system. One of which is that you don't see many tourists, so you can fish or hunt without fear of having a bunch of people wearing pink LL Bean jackets marching past ringing bear bells and loudly exclaiming about the exquisite sparrow they just saw or screaming in terror every time some fox starts following them around begging for a hand out. The Kodiak Chamber of Commerce says there is a tourist season, but I don't shoot rare animals or stuff I can't eat.

jim in Anchorage
May 1, 2011, 06:53 PM
Cosmoline- Right now I'm living right next to a fish store so I shave about $300 a month off the rent in an otherwise excellent neighborhood.

Fish store in Anchorage? 10th&M? And they knock off rent?

Anyway I hope the OP uses better spelling in his teaching position applications then in post #26.

KodiakBeer
May 1, 2011, 07:15 PM
Anyway I hope the OP uses better spelling in his teacher position applications then in post #26.

He was probably drunk when he typed that, which means he'll fit right in.

Shadow 7D
May 1, 2011, 07:32 PM
Gee's kodiak he could just be wired on coffee, which means he will fit in, or just bad at spelling, which means he will fit in....

Anchorage is big little city that thinks it's a little big city...
valley is almost the same palmer/wasilla, except they get to claim that they aren't anchorage, just in to anchorage twice a week. Past that it's the 'real' Alaska, where they turn up their nose to 'city dwellers' who might as well be in the lower 48

Oh, and your an 'outsider' until you make friends etc. so don't take it personally.
10'th and M, well, I couldn't live there, my wife would bankrupt me in a week, she really loves crab and halibut

jim in Anchorage
May 1, 2011, 07:33 PM
As a teacher or a Alaska resident? Or both?:D

Cosmoline
May 1, 2011, 08:00 PM
And they knock off rent?

To me the smell of the 10th & M dumpster brings back memories of Seward fishing trips. But apparently not everyone feels the same way. Go figure!

grubbylabs
May 2, 2011, 12:14 PM
Anyway I hope the OP uses better spelling in his teaching position applications then in post #26.

I am sure your spelling is 100% perfect all the time.


Since this is basically A chance for my family and I to start a new we are considering all options. Our children are young, oldest is 5 and the youngest should be here in the fall.

I really like the idea of the ferry and being able to skip Canada. That would make moving guns and reloading gear less problematic.

I can only imagine the hunting and fishing opportunities.

I have been told that if you really want to hunt you have to fly to get to the good areas.

For those of you who live there what are my available opportunities for Moose Bear and Caribou if I live someplace like Anchorage? Are there really animals behind every other tree or bush? I suspect that hunting is not nearly as easy as some of the hunting shows make it out to be. But I am more interested in great tasting meat than I am a set of antlers hanging on the wall.

Malamute
May 2, 2011, 12:23 PM
Flying opens a lot of country, but isn't cheap. The rivers are good ways to get around much of the country. Need a good riverboat tho. A good flatbottm boat with fair size motor, and jet setup will run a lot of water. Some do drop offs from roads or fly-ins and take rafts, and take out downstream somewhere, or get picked up by air later.

Depends on how much guns and reloading stuff you have as regards going thru Canada. They allow a certain amount of ammo, powder and primers to go thru without any problem, and it's "per person" so if the wife is along, that doubles it, not sure how much your kids can take. Handguns and military type self loaders are the only guns that are problematic going thru Canada, hunting type guns haven't been a problem for me. I thought driving thru Canada was half the fun of going. I drove thru Banff and Jasper, then thru Prince to Dawson Creek. The Cassiar was on my list also, but havent been back to do it. Wanted to do the Top of the World also, and maybe a run to Inuvik.

Guns had to be unloaded in BC when crossing the border, but not in the Yukon. There was a sign at the Yukon/BC border saying guns were supposed to be unloaded in vehicles in BC. They just asked me if they were loaded when I went in on the BC side, they didnt even look themselves. They wanted to see the guns, I just opened the cases, they looked, said "OK". That was about the most trouble crossing I had.

Cosmoline
May 2, 2011, 01:37 PM
Are there really animals behind every other tree or bush?

There's a lot of wildlife in Anchorage and up in the Chugach next door. And you can actually hunt quite a bit of it within an hour's drive, though few do. Most hunters get flown out or drift in, or some combination of the two. It tends to be a big expedition and a lot of work, though whether it *has* to be that way is another question. Nothing keeps you from going out and just shooting small game in the nearby GMU's which is a lot quicker and easier. Alaska F&G has its manuals posted on line which have a ton of info. The Alaska hunting forum also has a lot of info. If you are serious about hunting you have to learn the rather complex rules, which change from GMU to GMU. Hunting laws are very much enforced esp. when it comes to moose.

As far as the city wildlife, here are a few I've run into when I happened to have the video camera ready:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DqZLe1AQ5g

Chased by a bear cub--the ultimate humiliation!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYenxZOkW2M

Over the years I've had maybe half a dozen serious moose charges. But that's out of thousands of moose encounters. They're all over the place here. The brown bear are around, but tend to stay clear of people. You're most likely to see them around salmon spawning streams during that season. Black bear are extremely abundant. That cub was the only one to charge me, but I've nearly tripped over other ones on that same trail. They use tunnels through the devil's club to get around so you can't always see them in time. But they pose little real threat. They don't get super big here and are not the top of the food chain. Brown bear will maul a few people a year in the city, usually not fatal and sometimes little more than some scratches and an ear bitten off.

grubbylabs
May 2, 2011, 03:22 PM
Well thanks for the extra info. Like I said I am more interested in having quality meat in my freezer than I am horns on my wall. Don't get me wrong I would like to take trophy quality animals while I am there, but if it comes down to time with family or Horns, I will pick my family.


Where are some of the better areas to live that are fairly civilized and within a few hours drive of decent hunting?

We don't like to live in town, we both prefer living in the outlying areas where neighbors are not so close.

Plus I breed Labs and would need easy access to a major airport so they could be shipped if I needed too.

KodiakBeer
May 2, 2011, 03:32 PM
90% of the population lives on the road system between Anchorage and Fairbanks, and out the Kenai. Hunting there is probably equivalent to the northern rockies. So yeah, to get good hunting you have to fly off the road.

But... once you learn the ropes there are inexpensive ways to do that. For example, you can take a commercial hop to some village with a rubber raft, then float a river for 50 or 100 miles and take a commercial hop home from some other village. Even the charter flights aren't all that expensive if you share the tariff with a couple of good friends. The value of the meat you'll bring home will defray the cost of the hunt.

And you don't have to live on the road system. Most of the towns in southeast are pleasant places to live with good hunting and fishing on your door step. The two vid links I posted above in #31 were all taken right outside of town in Kodiak. You can hunt bear, deer and goats right outside town with little hunting pressure.

Malamute
May 2, 2011, 03:33 PM
Down on the Kenai peninsula south of Anchorage may be a good place to start looking seriously. Relatively close to civilzed stuff, and some room to get out without it being a huge expedition.

You should consider that the scale of the country is possibly larger than even what you're used to in Idaho. Whats "close" to those living there may not be exactly what you would think of as close, but still may be as good as you are likely to find regarding access to both towns/airports, and wild country. If you've been in the east or other more settled places, it will be similar to being in Idaho to those places, its just bigger country yet.

Cosmoline
May 2, 2011, 03:46 PM
The phrase "a few hours drive" limits you to the road system, which means Fairbanks, the Valley, Anchorage, Seward, Kenai and Homer give or take a few outer areas on the highways. Property is available in the Mat-Su, but it's not easy living. I tried it for a few years and got kicked around pretty good. Dog breeding gives rise to troubles finding places that allow you to have more than a few dogs. There are a lot of airports, but Stevens in Anchorage is the main one for that kind of business.

Shadow 7D
May 2, 2011, 04:39 PM
I've thought of sticking the thumb at birchwood, offering to pay gas

HorseSoldier
May 3, 2011, 01:00 AM
Don't drive, if you can at all help it. Sell your car, buy a used vehicle up here. Keep in mind, you only want to keep the car as long as you are up here.

I can see the logic, but the three times I've driven the Alcan (counting one trip at age 8) were the coolest road trips I've ever been on where I wasn't allowed to point machineguns at people.

Be prepared to spend a couple nights in a hotel before you find a place. (I recommend staying at the Residence Inn. Best hotel in town.

Nah, check into the Royal Suite Lodge on Minnesota just south of Spenard -- manage a couple nights there and you can handle anything Anchorage has to throw at you . . . ;)

You can ship guns up to yourself just fine. If you have a reservation at the hotel, that counts as a valid address. Otherwise you can ship to a FFL up here. Gunrunners is nearby to the Residence Inn, and costs $35 a gun to receive.

I'm too lazy at the moment to read the whole thread, so I'm probably reinventing the wheel, information wise.

That said -- what I did was: mail my long guns to myself (it helped that my wife was already here while I was ETS'ing downsouth), USPS and insured to the gills. Wasn't cheap since we're talking about ten or so long guns, but they all got here in good order.

Mailed high cap mags to myself as well.

For my pistols, I had them FedEx'ed them up here. Wild West Guns did me a seriously cool deal and charged me $50, total, to receive a pelican case with 15 handguns in it. I think their normal rate is $25/per.

You can take certain classes of weapons through Canada with paperwork and such, but I did not even bother to try that. My first trip up here in summer of '08 (moving my wife up), when Canadian Customs heard I was military and moving to Alaska to work in law enforcement they turned on a dime and went from nice and polite to "where are the guns we know are in your vehicle right now, sir?" with a speed that would impress a tweaked out meth-head who just injected PCP directly into his brain stem. Maybe they bug other people about other kinds of contraband, but my experience on both border crossings was that they only thing they are concerned about are guns.

Cosmoline
May 3, 2011, 12:55 PM
I avoid the border, but second hand reports are that US Customs has presented bigger problems than Canadian lately. That said I agree that mailing long guns to yourself is the best option if you can swing it. Taking handguns in checked secure luggage is also a good option provided you don't have too many. There are a lot of firearms here, but ammo is sometimes scarce. If you have a lot of ammo, renting a barge space for it and shipping it ORMD is an option. It would be a shame to have to buy new .357 Mag ammo at $45 a box!

Nah, check into the Royal Suite Lodge on Minnesota just south of Spenard -- manage a couple nights there and you can handle anything Anchorage has to throw at you . .

For the ULTIMATE Alaska experience, you need to rent a monthly room at the Spenard Motel! AKA SpoMoHoTo. Provided the Muni hasn't shut it down by then.

Cryogaijin
May 3, 2011, 01:52 PM
Nah, check into the Royal Suite Lodge on Minnesota just south of Spenard -- manage a couple nights there and you can handle anything Anchorage has to throw at you . . . Yeah, but I work for the Residence Inn, and enjoy giving the orientation and naturalization talks. :)

Shadow 7D
May 3, 2011, 02:26 PM
Comsmoline I've spent a few tours in Iraq, and I still wouldn't want to spend the night in that place

Cosmoline
May 3, 2011, 02:33 PM
The place has serious entertainment value. I used to stay there all the time and saw some pretty stupefying things. I can die without thinking the good Lord gypped me.

Little known fact--it's said that the Beatles spent a night there in their early years en route to a tour of Japan. The experience was so horrible that they became soured on western civilization and started to turn to drugs and eastern gurus. The rest is history.

grubbylabs
May 3, 2011, 04:07 PM
While the thought of staying at some of the hotels sounds amusing I don't think I will be going their with a wife and 3 small children. My would be to have at least an apartment rented by the time my family arrives. My dogs can come up soon after that.

KodiakBeer
May 3, 2011, 04:13 PM
I spent a week or so at the Royal Suites when I was almost immobilized from trauma. I mean, I'm on crutches and most of my body is swathed in ace wrap and bandages including my head - I'm seeing the world through one swollen eye peeking out of bandages. And what I'm seeing through that eye is pretty bleary since I'm zonked on demerol or some damned thing.
And every evening after the good folks at Providence have subjected me to various torture techniques, my wife is dropping me off in the parking lot near our room while she goes off to park the car. And while I'm waiting, people keep approaching me with "offers". So it's like "Sweetheart, does it look like I'm capable of any physical act more complex than falling down?" Or, "Dude, does it look like I need any drugs?" And in one case, since I didn't want to buy he's asking if I want to sell any of my good drugs...

My ex chose the hotel because she was "thrifty".

There's actually a much worse place (or used to be) down Spenard, kitty-corner from Gwinny's. It was (is?) set up like a highway motel with rooms facing a courtyard. The airport was snowed in, so this was the only place we could find near the airport. Apparently, the room was normally occupied by a very popular young woman on the weekends. And she was kind enough to knock on our door and introduce herself and ask us to send her customers to her new room number. And sure enough, for most of the night I'm clutching a Kimber compact and yelling through the door that "Susie" (or whatever her name was) is down in room #9 that night.

Cosmoline
May 3, 2011, 04:40 PM
I think that's the Eagle's Nest. It's a nest all right.

Point being, for thread purposes, do NOT have your firearms shipped to yourself at one of Spenard's infamous motels!

jim in Anchorage
May 3, 2011, 05:04 PM
This is brutal. Spenard? I recommend the mush in on 5th across from Merrill tower. Rooms rent by the hour.
BTY Cosmo I checked the Dumpster at the 10th & M on Muldoon and it did NOT smell [ever try to smell someones trash discretely?]

Cryogaijin
May 3, 2011, 06:26 PM
While the thought of staying at some of the hotels sounds amusing I don't think I will be going their with a wife and 3 small children. My would be to have at least an apartment rented by the time my family arrives. My dogs can come up soon after that. Thus the recommendation of my hotel. We have 2 bedroom suites that are designed for families like yours. 2 bedrooms, 3 beds, 2 bathrooms, full kitchen. Saves you from having to rent sight unseen.

grubbylabs
May 3, 2011, 07:58 PM
If I do get a job offer, my wife and I will be making a trip just so we can look around and see what there is to see. While I would take a local job on short notice I would not take one that far away on short notice. I want to know what I am getting my family into.

AlaskaMan
May 4, 2011, 09:29 PM
Just drove from Alaska to Washington via the ferry. If you get off the boat at Haines Alaska, there is NO WAY to get to the rest of Alaska without going through Canada. If you want to stay legal there is almost no way to take a firearm or ammunition through Canada.

I believe you can take 2000 rds of ammo, a thousand primers, 2 kilos of powder per person. Check with the Canadian Firearms people, they have a decent website.

Not legally you can't.

Fly to Alaska via Alaska Air. They allow up to 50 lb of ammo in checked baggage. Best and cheapest way for it to get there for sure.

Handguns in general are a prohibited item in Canada. Don't bother trying and don't believe the posts that say you can. Most of the folks are reading stuff that applies to Canadian residents when it comes to importing ammunition. The only exception to the ammunition is a 200 round limit when traveling to a recognized shooting competition.

KodiakBeer
May 4, 2011, 10:02 PM
If you get off the boat at Haines Alaska, there is NO WAY to get to the rest of Alaska without going through Canada.

You can connect through Juneau, to go to Whittier 60 miles from Anchorage. Or, new this year, you can sail directly from Bellingham to Whittier. You don't have to get off at Haines and drive through Canada.

Malamute
May 5, 2011, 12:42 AM
Quote:
I believe you can take 2000 rds of ammo, a thousand primers, 2 kilos of powder per person. Check with the Canadian Firearms people, they have a decent website.

Not legally you can't.



Curious where you are getting your information?


I was in fact mistaken, the quantities are larger than what I quoted. Those were the numbers when I went thru, apparenty they changed the quantities.

This is where I got my information:

http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/mms-smm/expl-expl/imp-imp-eng.htm

That was linked thru the Canadian Fireams Center, in the "I am a visitor to Canada" and see where "how much ammunition etc you can import without a license" sections.


If you want to stay legal there is almost no way to take a firearm or ammunition through Canada.



I'd really like to see your source of information on this statement. For the first time ever online, I call BS.

AlaskaMan
May 5, 2011, 04:55 PM
The section you were reading applies to Canadian Residents who are importing explosives into Canada, not non-residents traveling in Canada.

Here'es the RCMP link:
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/fs-fd/visit-visite-eng.htm


If you wish to bring ammunition from the US into Canada there is a limit:


"Consult with the Explosives Regulatory Division at NRCan to determine if the ammunition you wish to import is authorized and approved for importation and use in Canada. Note that tracer, armour-piercing and similar military cartridges are prohibited under Canadian law.

Within these limits, non-residents can import 200 rounds duty free for hunting purposes, or up to 1,500 rounds duty free for use at a recognized competition.

You can make arrangements to import larger quantities through a Canadian shooting association, committee or federation for team practice and competition at meets. For information on permits to import quantities of ammunition in excess of those mentioned above or for the purposes of sale, contact:

Explosives Regulatory Division
Natural Resources Canada
1431 Merivale Road
Ottawa ON K2E 1B9"

Here is the Canadian Customs link for that:
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5044-eng.html#P012

For example, handguns with a barrel length less than 4.14 inches long cannot be brought into Canada (they are a prohibited weapon).
Here are a few others:
"Non-restricted firearms include:
--semi-automatic rifles and shotguns with barrels that are at least 470 mm (18.5 inches) long, and do not otherwise fall into a restricted or prohibited category;
--and single-shot or manual repeating rifles and shotguns of any length, as long as they are not designed or adapted to be fired when reduced to a length of less than 660 mm (26 inches) by folding, telescoping or other means.
Restricted firearms include:
--most handguns;
--semi-automatic rifles and shotguns that are capable of discharging centre-fire ammunition, have barrels between 105 mm (4.14 inches) and 470 mm (18.5 inches) long, and are not otherwise prohibited;
--firearms designed or adapted to be fired when reduced to a length of less than 660 mm (26 inches) by folding, telescoping or other means; and
firearms restricted by regulations.
Prohibited firearms include:
--handguns with barrels less than or equal to 105 mm (4.14 inches) long;
--handguns designed or adapted to discharge a 25 or 32-calibre cartridge;
--firearms adapted from rifles or shotguns by sawing, cutting or any other alteration, that, when adapted in this way, are less than 660 mm (26 inches) long or have a barrel that is less than 457 mm (18.5 inches) long;
--automatic firearms, whether or not altered to fire in the manner of a semi-automatic firearm;
--and firearms prohibited by regulations.

Can firearms be brought into Canada legally? Yes, but with numerous challenges not easily overcome.

This is where I got my information:

http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/mms-smm/expl-...mp-imp-eng.htm

That was linked thru the Canadian Fireams Center, in the "I am a visitor to Canada" and see where "how much ammunition etc you can import without a license" sections.

Ok, so you've just "imported" the ammunition into Canada. You're approaching the US Border. Have you declared the "Exportation" of the ammunition? Are you ready to declare the "Importation" of the ammunition into the United States?

The Alaska Marine Highway System just started the Bellingham to Whittier route in May. They allow only 65 pounds of ammunition per vehicle.
http://www.dot.state.ak.us/amhs/documents/hazmat_public.pdf

Welcome to Alaska, it's worth it once you get here!

grubbylabs
May 5, 2011, 05:14 PM
Wow you all make it sound like so much fun to move there.

If we do get a job offer or consider accepting a job offer then We will be calling and e-mailing all the appropriate people, wrecking a career over some ammo or a gun seems kinda pointless.

Shadow 7D
May 5, 2011, 07:35 PM
Yeppers
called the last frontier for a reason....

HorseSoldier
May 5, 2011, 08:10 PM
Fly to Alaska via Alaska Air. They allow up to 50 lb of ammo in checked baggage. Best and cheapest way for it to get there for sure.

Which is a very cool deal HOWEVER make sure you quadruple check your packaging with both Alaska Air and TSA. My last trip back down to the Lower 48 entailed my hauling 95 pounds of ammunition back up (me + wife, with some safety slop built into the load out). The airline was 100% cool with me. They did suggest I verify with the TSA desk just to make sure it was copacetic. Some TSA sweater vest wearing drone whose knowledge level fully matched that $7.00/hour they pay him assured me I was good to go.

When my tough boxes fully of ammo turned up three days later they were about 80 pounds light, with TSA having seized anything someone (presumably someone besides the sweater vest wearing drone) had determined was not sufficiently and properly packaged for their protocols. (Everything was in sealed boxes thoroughly swaddled in duct tape, then placed in a locked tough box with those cool TSA openable locks -- apparently TSA felt that some of my ammo in boxes needed to also be in smaller boxes or the terrorists might win.)

Anyway, after going around and around with both the TSA and Alaska Air (both of whom accused the other of having my ammo, eventually) I never did get eighty pounds (and couple thousand dollars worth) of ammo back.

Lesson learned? Next time I'm getting something in writing from the TSA drone verifying my stuff passes muster and if my ammo isn't on the ground for me with the rest of my luggage, hell gets raised then and there at 0100 local AK time and I'm getting both my ammo and the drone's job on a plate before the dust settles.

mr_goodbomb
May 5, 2011, 08:19 PM
Gunrunners is is Alaska. They've got nice stuff, just ordered from them. Here's to hoping it works out.

Shadow 7D
May 5, 2011, 08:33 PM
Horse, did you call Murkowski's office?
I hear she took over uncle Ted's job of dealing with the TSA

Cryogaijin
May 6, 2011, 05:17 AM
Gunrunners is is Alaska. They've got nice stuff, just ordered from them. Here's to hoping it works out. If you have an issue, send me a PM and I'll go poke Neils, Troy, or Mike. They're good folk. Sold me my first Saiga. :)

jim in Anchorage
May 6, 2011, 05:38 AM
Is that Troy McDade? Which store does he work at? Haven't seen him since they closed the Eagle river branch. Sold me a milled SKS trigger group for $19-just what I had in my pocket:D

Pete D.
May 6, 2011, 06:46 AM
I just noticed they've added a direct run to Whittier.

Then he'd get to drive under the mountain (or through it).
One of the many things that I said "wow!" about during my few trips to AK.
Pete

Malamute
May 6, 2011, 01:07 PM
This is the information linked on the RCMP site under firearms users visiting Canada link to the explosives people, it did't ay anything about residents. When I've travelled thru, the US side didnt care about ammo, or never asked when I registered the stuff I was taking out, including guns. Never heard of any problem taking ammo for personal use out of the US into Canada as a problem for anyone. It's the Canadians that are the question.

Explosives that may be imported without an explosives Importation Permit Explosive Type Quantity
Safety cartridges 5000
Percussion caps (primers) for safety cartridges 5000
Empty primed cartridge cases 5000
Gunpowder (black powder) in canisters of 500 g or less and smokeless powder in canisters of 4000 g or less 8 kg
Model rocket engines 6
Pyrotechnic distress signals and lifesaving devices Any quantity necessary for the safe operation of the aircraft, train, vessel or vehicle in which they are transported, or for the safety of the occupants


Akman, all the stuff you linked regarding the restricted arms is all well and good, but its also consistant with everything thats already been posted in this thread. Hunting type guns are no problem, I've done it an a number of occasions, the experience wasn't anything to get excited about in any way, and about eneryone I've talked to that's been thru (and followed the rules) said pretty much the same thing. Military style self loaders, barrels under a certain length, (longer than the US regs) are a problem, and handguns are, unless you have a particlar thing you're doing with them, like a shooting match, or cultural event etc that requires them (and are pre-registered etc and have all your paperwork in order and with you) . I know people that have taken handguns into Canada, it required some extra paperwork, but wasn't any huge problem once the paperwork was done. Just traveling thru isnt one of the exceptions to be able to take handguns in, and that was already mentioned. I still don't see where the comment " If you want to stay legal there is almost no way to take a firearm or ammunition through Canada." applies. It isn't difficult to do. The only thing related to ammo besides the couple thousand rds I had, was they asked if I had any hollow point handgun ammo. I had one or two boxes of hollow point 22's they kept, and exactly 6 rds of 44 mag hollow points which they kept, (they give you a receipt for anything they keep) after that, they said "have a nice trip".


From some of the comments in this thread, it looks like some the things people have done to avoid Canada with guns is more trouble than taking them thru.

ET
May 6, 2011, 01:35 PM
My sister moved to Fairbanks after she graduated from school some 35 years ago. She drove the Alaska highway when it was dirt & rocks. Every car that took that trip ended it with a cracked windshield. She worked for the state and loved Alaska. As most non-native Alaskians do, she moved back to the lower 48 when her blood started thinning out. She lives in Tennessee now, but cherishes her days in Alaska. Part of me wishes I had done the same. It is a different world up there. You are totally in touch with nature & there in lies the good & the bad.

MOBoyNoMo
May 7, 2011, 12:16 AM
Wow best of luck to ya. That's someplace Id sure like to live someday.

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