Gun Dilemma


PDA






avs11054
May 4, 2011, 04:36 PM
So my dad died about 8 years ago. When he died, I inherited all of his guns. Some of them I use, but there are about 5 or 6 that I have never shot, and I don't plan to/have any need to shoot them. I have thought about selling them to buy some guns that I would like to shoot, but then there is always that sentimental value to them, which cannot be replaced.

For those of you that have been in the same situation before, what did you do, and what do you think of your decision looking back on it?

If you enjoyed reading about "Gun Dilemma" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
M-Cameron
May 4, 2011, 04:51 PM
dont sell them.......


if you sell them......it might not be the next day...or even the next month.........but one day you are going to wake up and wish you still had them........and you are going to regret selling them.....

hardworker
May 4, 2011, 04:53 PM
What did your dad use the guns for? If it was something he used a lot I wouldn't sell it, but if it was something he bought and tossed in the safe after realizing how much he hated it I might consider selling it.

gym
May 4, 2011, 04:54 PM
If you have a son or family, My opinion would be to keep them for them. Of course if you could use the money and it will make a difference in your life then sell them. I would leave them to my kids if I had kids. As it stands they go to my wifes kids, they can do what they want with them at that point.

avs11054
May 4, 2011, 05:00 PM
No kids as of yet. I'm 26. No desire to have kids any time soon, if ever, either. As far as my dad's uses for them, one was a 20 gauge that he hunted pheasants with. He bought me a MUCH nicer 20 gauge than the one he used, so no real need to keep that one. One was a 30-30 that was actually my dad's uncle's. He gave it to my dad when he died. My dad never had any use for it because he used other guns for elk, and now i use those other guns for elk. One is a 12 gauge that I don't know where my dad got it from. I never saw him use it, and I have never used it. Another is a .243 that my dad actually bought for me. Not that the .243 isn't a great gun, but I use my dad's .270 now though. The last is a .38 special, which I actually have shot the heck out of, but now it is just a safe queen as my main interests are in rifles now.

avs11054
May 4, 2011, 05:03 PM
dont sell them.......


if you sell them......it might not be the next day...or even the next month.........but one day you are going to wake up and wish you still had them........and you are going to regret selling them.....
This is one of my main concerns. If I ever did have kids, I might one day want to pass them down. But on the other hand, I would want to pass something to my kids that I enjoyed using so that they could enjoy using it. If I pass them guns that sat in the safe for 50 years, they might be meaningless to the kids.

azmjs
May 4, 2011, 05:06 PM
Di-Lemma. Double Proposition.

The Greek prefix "di-" means "double" or "two."

It took a while to figure out what the title of this meant.

Anyway, don't sell the guns.

kyhuntsman94
May 4, 2011, 06:20 PM
Personally, I would not sell a gun that my father or grandfather gave me. As several have said before, you might wake up one morning and regret it. That has a piece of history that you may never get back.

With that in mind, if I were to sell one or two sell the 20 gauge that you do not use and the 30-30. You might consider selling the 243; however, that is the perfect caliber to start a young hunter off with.

MachIVshooter
May 4, 2011, 06:43 PM
As far as my dad's uses for them, one was a 20 gauge that he hunted pheasants with. He bought me a MUCH nicer 20 gauge than the one he used, so no real need to keep that one. One was a 30-30 that was actually my dad's uncle's. He gave it to my dad when he died. My dad never had any use for it because he used other guns for elk, and now i use those other guns for elk. One is a 12 gauge that I don't know where my dad got it from. I never saw him use it, and I have never used it. Another is a .243 that my dad actually bought for me. Not that the .243 isn't a great gun, but I use my dad's .270 now though. The last is a .38 special, which I actually have shot the heck out of, but now it is just a safe queen as my main interests are in rifles now.

There are a couple of ways to look at this, though with either, I'd keep the .243 he bought for you. I can pretty much guarantee you'd regret letting that one go.

As for the others, if they're not worth much money, I say keep them. On the other hand, if there's nothing special about them and you can sell them and get something you really want, then the spirit of the inheritance can live on in that and you'll be that much more appreciative.

BUT..............don't sell them to buy some junk thing that'll be gone in a few years or to pay bills (unless you've no other choice). I think you'll feel fine about selling them for something else you'll keep forever, but you'll have regrets if the mementos are gone and you've nothing to show for it.

Most things are just things, and I'd have no issue selling a passed family member's washing machine, blender, etc. But there are certain items that really are more than that when received from a deceased loved one. Firearms, pocket watches, or anything else that can be passed down with memories that follow.

jiminhobesound
May 4, 2011, 07:03 PM
When my father died he left me his guns. It was all I got from him but it was about all he had. There were 13 guns ranging from an old pistol to pre 64 Winchesters and LC Smith. Because of financial problems, lost my job, I had to sell those guns. It is and will be the most regretable event in my life. You will make a decsision based on your relationship with your father and your family and your plans for the future and your personal family situation.

usmarine0352_2005
May 4, 2011, 07:23 PM
.



What about keeping 1 or a few of the ones you might use to pass on to your kids and selling the ones you don't want or give them to other family members who may enjoy them?

.

Ole Coot
May 4, 2011, 07:30 PM
I have all of my late Dad's and Granddads. I haven't fired any of them and probably won't. Those are the "keepers" that brings back great memories.

Shadow 7D
May 4, 2011, 07:34 PM
If you do HAVE to sell them, offer them to family first.

LawScholar
May 4, 2011, 07:53 PM
Personally, unless in dire financial or medical need, I would never sell a family firearm.

kenhwind
May 4, 2011, 08:04 PM
Personally, unless in dire financial or medical need, I would never sell a family firearm.
Sometimes economics overrides sentiment. My brother and I sold some of my Dad's guns, because we had to. Actually we sold a bunch of ours too. But we kept Dad's guns that meant something.

NRA Lifer
May 4, 2011, 08:07 PM
I just bought a bigger gun safe. Never ever will I sell them. I have firearms from my great grandfather, grandfather and father. All of which I have shot at one time, but no more. And as with most things like this the value is mostly sentimental.

TBH
May 4, 2011, 08:25 PM
At 50 years old (51 this month) my veiws and feelings are completely different than at 26 years old. Your attachment to your dad's guns may and probably will change over time. If you do nothing more than pull those firearms out of the safe from time to time and handle them and remember the good times with your father, they will be well worth keeping.
Last year I pulled my dad's 303 British out. He passed when I was 28. I cleaned it up and the bolt needed some oil and use. I touched off half a dozen shots with it. Was it accurate? Not really. But it is the one rifle they will have to pry out of my cold dead hands.

talldragon
May 5, 2011, 02:16 PM
Don't sell them, you may regret it. Leaving them to family or just saving them for that possible eventuality (you may have kids someday, never say never!).

9mm+
May 5, 2011, 02:39 PM
I inherited three guns from my father-in-law when he died -- two S&W Model 10's and one Browning Auto 5. I wouldn't trade or sell the guns you received from your dad. If they become safe queens, then so be it, but you could possibly hand them down to your kids or other family members at a later date. My Model 10's are going to my two sons when they leave the house in a few years. It's a good way for them to remember their grandfather.

mrbro
May 5, 2011, 02:42 PM
...But we kept Dad's guns that meant something.

I have my dad's guns and understand what this means. There are some that, when I pick them up, tell me a story. I'll never sell these stories. There are others though that held no real meaning to him, so I'm not attached to them. Rather than sell them these are available to any of my relatives that may have an interest or need.

Nausea
May 5, 2011, 03:00 PM
When my father passed about five years ago I took as many of his posessions as I could, but I am slowly starting to part with some of them.
I'd keep the 30-30 because it has a lot of sentimentality behind it, it'll make a good heirloom. I'd also keep the .270 since he bought it for you, more sentimentality there. Regret is a heck of a thing, as others have pointed out, your not too likely get them back if you do sell them, but you don't "need" them. Best of luck that is a tough decision.

-kyle

BothellBob
May 5, 2011, 03:31 PM
Here's my story. My greatgrandfather worked in the gold fields of the west in the late 1800s and participated in the Alaskan gold rush in Nome. He had a pair of revolvers that I know about and a 22 single shot rifle that he gave to my grandfather. During WWII my widowed grandmother sold those revolvers (her father-in-laws) because times were hard. She kept my late grandfathers other two revolvers (he was part of the sheriff's reserve) and the rifle. My father ended up with the rifle and one revolver, but he was not a "gun guy" and he gave the revolver to a friend when I was very young. The rifle came to me and the other revolver is in the hands of a cousin. There are 14 greatgrandchildren and who knows how many ggc and gggc (and those generations are not done yet). Most of my relatives are not particularly gun people, but a few of us are and there are only two family guns for all the generations from here forward. Do you or will you have nieces or nephews? It may not seem like it now, but in just a few years you may be a grandfather. Document you guns. Tell their story. Take pictures of you shooting them. Save any picturse you have of you and your dad with the guns. Write your greatgreatgrandchildren a letter to go with each gun. Your posterity will love you for it.
-BothellBob

TX1911fan
May 5, 2011, 03:54 PM
I wish I had gotten guns from my dad. I'm starting the tradition with my son. I hope he never sells those that I pass on, but I would understand if he had to. If he did it to get something else, I'd probably be sad.

ny32182
May 5, 2011, 04:02 PM
I might change my tune if I'm ever in this exact situation, but to me "stuff" is not that sentimental. My memories of people departed are just that; memories.

I guess it would depend on the size of the collection, and how much I personally related a given firearm to someone. I had a great uncle, who unfortunately I barely knew (and never once shot with him), who I understand was into guns and reloading, and may therefore have had a non-negligible collection; honestly I don't know. But I could very well end up with it one day because I am the only shooter in my generation of the family. If 50 guns showed up on my doorstep, for which I have no personal memories especially, I can't say I would likely keep most or even a majority of them.

If I got a hold of one or two specific guns that I know my grandfather carried in Korea, or the one rifle my dad owned the whole time I was growing up, I would not likely ever sell those.

HankR
May 5, 2011, 04:12 PM
... I would want to pass something to my kids that I enjoyed using so that they could enjoy using it. If I pass them guns that sat in the safe for 50 years, they might be meaningless to the kids.

I wouldn't be to sure of that. If your father lives on in shared memories and the stories you tell your kids, something that belonged to Grandpa would have a lot of sentimental value. When my wife's father died, his hunting guns went to nephews that still hunted. Grammy gave me a buck knife that her husband had used as a hunting knife, almost as an after thought. I had recently married into the family, and we had no kids at the time. That knife, with a shelf value of less than $20, was oiled and put away when I got home. I figured if I didn't have kids to hand it down to I would feed it back into my wife's family -- the nephew's already had toddlers at this time.

Fast forward many years, and I now have a 12 year old boy who is really into pocket knives. He's heard stories of Grandpa Jack, looked at maps of where Grandpa served in WWII, looked at beautiful home-made furniture that Grandpa had made (and has started to realize how difficult such carpentry is). As soon as I think he is unlikely to lose that knife I'm going to give it to him, and he will consider it priceless. (In fact, this post has me thinking I'll do that when I get home tonight).

That's a long way of saying "don't sell" and if you must, try to keep them in the family. If your father's uncle has any relatives, you could offer the 30-30 to them, for example. I'd definitely hang onto the 20 gauge that he used to hunt, and the .243 the he bought for you, maybe even selling my own shotgun first.

Sako Shooter
May 5, 2011, 04:22 PM
I inhereited 3 Belgium Browning shotguns, an RWS .410 shotgun, a .30-06 Remington auto, and a Remington Speedmaster from my grandfather. Quite frankly, I have no use for any of the rifles as neither the Speedmaster (the best of the bunch) nor the .30-06 will shoot sub-moa, as will my own personal rifles. I have replaced the heavy Belgium Brownings I grew up using with a newer, lighter Browning that will shoot 2 3/4" up to 3 1/2" shells and comes with optional choke settings. Needless to say, I have no use whatsoever for a .410 shotgun.

I really want a Cooper 22 rifle at present, and could probably sell the above guns on an even swap. However, the guns are about the only "physical" memory of grandpa I have left, so I just let them sit in the safe.

Ala Dan
May 5, 2011, 05:28 PM
Faced with the same situation back in 1996, I sold my dads Beretta .22 caliber
"Minx"; chambered in .22 short. Its something I did not need, nor did I want
because I had my dads other weapons to use/remember him by~! I have never
looked back on my decision.

avs11054
May 5, 2011, 10:48 PM
Thanks for all the replies everyone. I'll take the advice of most of you and keep the guns. I don't need the money, just wanted to get some different guns with the money I would get from selling them. I guess I will do it the old fashion way and just save up.

I'm glad I got some advice from people with a little more experience.

TIMC
May 6, 2011, 01:40 PM
I was in your situation last year after inheriting quite a few guns from my father. I sold off quiet a few, especially ones I had in the same gun myself. All the real family heirloom guns of which to me were really only a few will be kept and handed down, those are guns that were special to my dad or belonged to my grandfather. The others are just like having too many tools that you will never use. or my dads vehicles and household furnishings; you just can't keep it all so some were sold off.

I did take his favorite deer rifle and have it completely rebuilt since it was about shot out. The old Remington 700 is now a tack driver again and will be handed down to my grandkids.

The other few heirloom guns were for the most part handed down to me several years ago because he wanted to make sure I got them. These will be kept in the family as well.

Single Action Six
May 6, 2011, 02:41 PM
AVS11054 said in part..

Another is a .243 that my dad actually bought for me. Not that the .243 isn't a great gun, but I use my dad's .270 now though. The last is a .38 special, which I actually have shot the heck out of, but now it is just a safe queen as my main interests are in rifles now.

Read what you said about the .243.

"My dad actually bought for me". Now THAT one's definitely a keeper.. not because it's a .243, but because of why it was bought in the first place.

As far as the .38 special..

One can NEVER have enough handguns/sidearms no matter what they are.. except for "GLOCK" of course! :uhoh: :D

(I'm only kidding about the Glock. Even though I don't like Glocks, if that's what trips your trigger (get the pun?), then so be it.)

Single Action Six

KingMedicine
May 6, 2011, 08:25 PM
I havent read a single post past the first poster, but i already know what they said, and i agree.. Dont sell a family firearm. Charish them, even if they are old and cheap, they mean something.

JH225
May 6, 2011, 11:06 PM
I would have to go against the grain here. The OP already stated that the guns he is thinking of selling do not have any "cherished" memories. They are just guns that dad had and now he has.

IF you are going to use the funds from the sale to acquire gun(s) you will actually use and enjoy, I think dear old dad would in no way frown upon the sale of some of his old guns. In fact, I feel he would say "cool, enjoy them".

Gordon_Freeman
May 7, 2011, 12:58 AM
Don't sell them. I get a sick feeling when I imagine my children selling my guns after I'm gone. My wishes are for them to keep the guns in the family.

JTHunter
May 7, 2011, 01:39 AM
AVS11054 - My father had a collection of flintlock and percussion-cap rifles, a SxS double-trigger exposed hammers shotty, at least 4 cavalry sabers with filigree bells as handguards, :eek: 2 short, heavy swords that look straight out of a gladiator's hand, the pump action .22 LR that I learned on as a kid, his M-1 and 1911 from his Natl. Guard days. Somewhere around the time he and wife #2 were getting divorced, she claims they (along with other items) were "stolen". :fire: :cuss:
I would LOVE to be able to have those items, even if in non-working condition.
BE VERY CAUTIOUS about letting any of those guns go! So what if they are "safe queens"? They are part of your family's history.

If you enjoyed reading about "Gun Dilemma" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!