Should I Inform My Employer That I CC?


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dcdub
May 4, 2011, 08:00 PM
I do a lot of driving for work, and ever since I got my CHP I've been worried about getting pulled over and having to inform the officer that I have a concealed handgun on me in front of my boss/father-in-law.

I'm not sure how he would react; he can be very opinionated and emotional rather than logical. He knows I have guns- he was thrilled to find out I have a .22 when the squirrels on his property became an issue. When he was concerned about the bullet travelling too far I showed him my 20 gauge.

I don't think he knows I have handguns though. I think he may be of the opinion, as a highly conservative Christian, that one should never take the life of another human being, even to save your own life or a family member's, and that it's ok to own long guns for hunting but handguns are "evil".

Should I: 1) tell him, and risk him lowering his opinion of me?
2) continue CCing and risk getting pulled and him finding out anyway? Or
3) maybe just carry some pepper spray while at work and not bring up anything about guns?

I hope that one day if I have a daughter that grows up and gets married her husband will do anything to protect her, but I know he's not going to see it that way... Any thoughts will be greatly appreciated! I'm stumped!

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Good&Fruity
May 4, 2011, 08:04 PM
no......

cbrgator
May 4, 2011, 08:04 PM
Not a great situation. I'd probably just keep it to yourself though.

GIJOEL
May 4, 2011, 08:08 PM
While you have the right to carry and ought to when YOU want to I understand your predicament. I would test the waters, bring up a news story about someone defending themselves with a handgun and see how he reacts. There are ways to get a feel for how he feels about the subject without disclosing your status.

hermannr
May 4, 2011, 08:09 PM
Continue to carry, drive safely and just don't get pulled over.......

and invite you FIL to go the range with you and let him shoot some of your handguns. If you are afraid to ask your FIL, ask you MIL and wife to go shoot with you. The information will get back to your FIL....:D

I'm opinionated, I have 5 married daughters, and I would love to go shooting with my daughters and SIL's. The only time I can ever shoot with them is when they come over here to visit.

Do any of my SIL's have guns I would not waste my own money on? Sure, but they are their weapons, not mine.

armedwalleye
May 4, 2011, 08:13 PM
On the clock while driving or not?
Your vehicle or the company vehicle?
Are you in a "shall inform" state or not?

Might put a small sticky note on the permit, hand it to the officer with your DL, informing him you have a weapon and it's location on your person.

Japle
May 4, 2011, 08:15 PM
No.

It's easier to explain to your boss why you were carrying a gun in person than from the grave.

joeq
May 4, 2011, 08:30 PM
I'm in a similar situation where I work. I drive the speed limit everywhere I go so I don't get pulled over. Generally, you won't get pulled over if your not doing anything wrong. I always like to make sure all the bulbs are working on the truck before I take off. I would hate to get pulled over for something stupid like that. I just prefer to keep the fact that I'm carrying to myself. There is no need for anyone else to know. Like others have said, if your uncomfortable then maybe you can try and feel him out. He might be perfectly fine with it and you'll be good to go. good luck.

dcdub
May 4, 2011, 08:49 PM
Thanks for the replies. I have tried testing him out and I get mixed reactions from him all the time, just depends on what mood he's in. He really is a unique individual...
It is a company vehicle, and I am on the clock, so I feel like I should respect his wishes. However, there is no company policy regarding firearms, so I'm not doing anything wrong.
And NC we must inform.

The sticky note is an interesting idea, but officers in this area usually like to hold the weapon "for their safety." I never get pulled over, but a friend of mine who carries gets pulled about once a month and it happens to him every time.

mustang_steve
May 4, 2011, 09:03 PM
To inform is technically to open carry. Concealed implies nobody knows you are carrying, thus any revelation as to the weapons on you would therefore make it "open" carry.

This is also why I avoid wearing shirts that would allude to such things as well, as I feel it's a veiled attempt at bragging about my carry. That just doesn't play well with my ideas on this.

Heck, I ankle carried a 22wmr derringer to my interview. That same derringer was also carried in 5 different manners during the time I owned it. I've since went to a pistol that I feel better serves my defensive needs, but still of a very small nature.

For off-work....a 9mm is not a problem, but at work concealment is paramount.

FourTeeFive
May 4, 2011, 09:04 PM
I think this comes under the heading of "It's Better To Beg For Forgiveness Than To Ask For Permission"

Burt Blade
May 4, 2011, 09:13 PM
"Carry Concealed Weapon", where "concealed" generally means "No one is supposed to know about it."

I suggest keeping it concealed.

Merkules
May 4, 2011, 09:24 PM
Have him listen to "The Urban Shooter" podcast ep. 186. "Christianity And Guns"
Ken Blanchard does a great job of breaking it down. Let him respond and judge his reaction to it on whether or not you should inform him of your CC'ing. If he reacts negatively, play it off. He knows you have guns.

rondog
May 4, 2011, 09:38 PM
If it's not a stated policy, why don't you just ask him?

Bigphil54
May 4, 2011, 09:50 PM
imho i would definatly stick to carrying the pistol. If your gonna tell him try having a third party that is sympathetic to your side but close enough to him that they may be able to talk sense into him

ghostwriter
May 4, 2011, 09:56 PM
keep packin, keep it concealed, keep your mouth shut, keep acting like a responsible citizen with rights and if & when he comes into the picture, you can deal with it then.

TempestP226
May 4, 2011, 09:59 PM
While you have the right to carry and ought to when YOU want to I understand your predicament. I would test the waters, bring up a news story about someone defending themselves with a handgun and see how he reacts. There are ways to get a feel for how he feels about the subject without disclosing your status.
I definitely agree with testing the waters. Either way, his opinion of you won't matter if you're dead.

Hangingrock
May 4, 2011, 10:00 PM
Is working for your father-in-law the only employment option you have? It appears he casts a large shadow and you may get lost in his shadow. At some point you have to be your own man and not a yes man to your father-in-law. I myself respect an individual that stands for their own believes even thou I am opposed to that view point.

XxWINxX94
May 4, 2011, 10:01 PM
If you informed anyone that you were CCing, logistically it really isn't "concealed," as in nobody knows or sees it, but rather just nobody can see it and they know about it.

dodgensince74
May 4, 2011, 10:59 PM
If you really feel you must carry while at work you should ask him how he feels about it and let him know how you feel about it. If he objects to you carring at work, then either don't carry while working or find another job that does allow it. Your an adult which is why you are allowed to carry concealed, so don't act like a little kid that just broke something and is trying to keeps his parents from finding out so he won't get in trouble. You stated that in NC you must inform, so if you don't then you are not abiding by the agreement you signed to get the permit. If he were to find out you were carring on the job without informing him and he decided to fire you, it could be grounds for you not recieving any kind of unemployment benifits (if you applied) and your ex-employer disclosed that fact. JMO

Tinpig
May 4, 2011, 11:26 PM
My legal concealed carry habits are nobody's concern. I carry concealed when I visit my daughter's apartment in Boston. She might not like it, but she doesn't know because the pistol is concealed and I don't talk about it.

I'm carrying legally. I feel no need to discuss it with her or anyone else. Don't ask, don't tell.

Furncliff
May 4, 2011, 11:45 PM
Your employer has a right to know if you're carrying a gun during the course of company business. He could be held liable if you had a ND or...

Trebor
May 4, 2011, 11:54 PM
Nothing good will come of telling him now. It won't prevent problems down the road and is likely to cause problems. Do you really think he'll go, "Great, glad to hear that."

No, more likely it will be an issue and he'll be uncomfortable, ask you not to carry, or tell you not to carry.

If he accidentally finds out, deal with it then. Try to prevent that as much as possible and definitely don't open your mouth to cause yourself problems now when you'd be better off "leaving well enough alone."

Hunter125
May 4, 2011, 11:59 PM
Don't assume that he will be opposed just because he is a conservative Christian. I am a conservative Christian and I would carry in a heartbeat if it was legal here.
Also, it would be a little different if he were only your boss, but as your FIL, surely you can talk to him openly about whether or not you carry at any given time.
I think that if I was going to carry at work, I would ask my boss to make sure everything was kosher, but especially if he were also my FIL. Just MHO.

Owen Sparks
May 5, 2011, 12:07 AM
How far up north do you live?

If it is legal for you to carry, continue to do so up until the point that he asks you not to bring a gun on his property (or posts a sign to that effect) That is how the law works in many states. If you don't tell him he probably won't think to ask. Does he own the vehicle you are driving at work?

ForumSurfer
May 5, 2011, 12:13 AM
I don't think he knows I have handguns though. I think he may be of the opinion, as a highly conservative ChristianMeans nothing, brother. I traded a 1911 for a 308 AR...with a preacher man. (edit::He used it for a carry piece.) :)

I go by the "don't ask, don't tell" policy.

I do a lot of driving for work, and ever since I got my CHP I've been worried about getting pulled over and having to inform the officer that I have a concealed handgun on me in front of my boss/father-in-law. Get that out of your head, dude. Do the legal thing without remorse. In NC, we have a duty to inform and a state trooper will enforce that. They don't play. If you hesitate and try to mention it to him quietly so that your bos/FIL won't notice...you're breaking the law AND you're making a guy with a gun who is already possibly nervous even more nervous. That's bad voodoo.

I wouldn't tell my boss. It isn't his business if there aren't any policies.

I would tell my FIL, but I'd sit down man to man with him. I'd also have a well thought out argument WELL ahead of time....complete with examples and local news stories of bad people doing bad things.

thorazine
May 5, 2011, 02:05 AM
Another vote for,

[X] Nope.. keep it to yourself.

Sheepdog1968
May 5, 2011, 12:46 PM
Ah, I reread the OP. It's your father-in-law. I am much more inclined to say don't tell him. If there is ever a reason he finds out, then explain to him you want to be able to return safely to his daughter at night. Also, assuming you have all the paperwork to CCW, how would he find out even if you get pulled over? Why would you show him the ticket?

ny32182
May 5, 2011, 01:06 PM
Unless he has some very profitable business you are interested in, and have well founded designs on taking it over one day, I would likely seek employment elsewhere.

If you are in close contact with him every day, eventually he will figure it out. You know much better than anyone here what his likely reaction will be.

hermannr
May 5, 2011, 01:21 PM
I didn't notice the "very Conservative Christian" statement. That is the last thing I would worry about.

I am confessional Lutheran (which some would consider a very conservative christian) I carry, our pastor has more guns then I do, and a CPL. My Dad was (he is long deceased) a Lutheran pastor, and he definately believed in self defence. He was pastor of a Lutheran church in LA during the Watts Riots. I now have his guns (along with my own).

Christians carry, not a problem. Good Christians try their best to obey the laws of the country they live in, and it is legal to carry you know....so what's the problem? That your FIL is a Christian should not even come into the equation.

Like I said earlier, Ask him to go to the range with you, He might like it. Discuss carrying for self defence (in general, not specifically you) while he is shooting, Try it.

mrbro
May 5, 2011, 01:27 PM
Lets look at this from another POV.

If you are driving a company vehicle and on company time you are placing his company under some risk should something happen that involved your use of that firearm. Whether he would ultimately be held liable in civil or criminal court is only partially the point, either way he would amass considerable legal costs defending his position. Since, I presume, the business does use armed employees, he is not likely insured for any claims that might occur as a result and could have to go it on his own, to the point of losing the business. He could even be forced to spend money because he did not have a policy against employees carrying firearms.

How would this impact the relationship with your father in law? How about with your spouse?

I recommend you leave the gun home and never tell him you carried it on the job.

MachIVshooter
May 5, 2011, 01:29 PM
However, there is no company policy regarding firearms, so I'm not doing anything wrong.

There's your answer. Most companies that have a problem with it will outline that. If they don't, I think one can reasonably assume that it's an acceptable practice.

I say continue to carry, and do so discreetly.

Owen Sparks
May 5, 2011, 01:35 PM
Remember the old saying: It is easier to get forgivness than permission?

Sam1911
May 5, 2011, 01:41 PM
Remember the old saying: It is easier to get forgivness than permission?


And it is better to ask forgiveness than to have your untimely passing mourned by your loved ones.

As hackneyed as the expression certainly is, "concealed is concealed." One's self-defense tools are private.

ScottieG59
May 5, 2011, 01:54 PM
My wife is anti-gun and is annoyed that I have guns. I do my best not to talk about it with her. The main issue I have is that I keep my handgun concealed and I do not mention that I am carrying when we are out. My wife is not savvy enough to refrain from the topic in public or in front of our children. She is also opinionated and does not take hints about my wish that she stops talking openly about it.

As to the workplace, your situation is potentially complicated. For me, it is easy. I work for the federal government and my permit is invalid on the job. In other jobs, there may be a some flexibility. On the one hand, you can be told to stop carrying on the job. On the other hand, you may expose yourself to some legal exposure. I think you can be considered a trespasser if you are asked to leave with the gun and you stay.

I did have a job where I legally carried a handgun. The boss knew but the other employees did not. I handled large amounts of cash and being armed was a safety precaution. It was awkward when some other employees found I was armed when the boss was concerned with a particularly large cash deposit and asked me. I carried 100% of the time. I also randomized my travel times and routes as well as never told the other employees when I was going to the bank.

If I were legally able to carry at work and there is no policy against it, I would do so. If my duties require me to go places where my permit did not allow, I would ensure I have a secure area in the vehicle. My vehicle is equipped with two safes. If I have to leave the handgun in the vehicle, I store the unloaded handgun in one safe and the ammo in the other.

milefile
May 5, 2011, 01:59 PM
If you ever have to save his ass with your evil gun he will likely change his tune.

How is it "Christian" to not defend yourself?

Sam1911
May 5, 2011, 02:07 PM
How is it "Christian" to not defend yourself?


Look, there are various Christian sects and branches which consider pacifism a crucial part of their belief structure -- yes, to the point of dying rather than causing harm. (Society of Friends/Quakers for example, among others.)

But this isn't the forum to debate the validity of those religious beliefs. If dcdub says that is part of his F-I-L's belief system, about all we can do is accept that it is so.

It isn't critical to the quesiton anyway. The man doesn't have to be religious to oppose guns or self-defense.

Mags
May 5, 2011, 02:11 PM
Don't do anything to get pulled over, problem solved.

Creature
May 5, 2011, 02:16 PM
Was disclosure a condition of your employment?

Ala Dan
May 5, 2011, 04:32 PM
Putting trust/faith in your father in-law could prove to be a mistake; especially
if he looks down on guns, or 2nd Amendment Rights. I don't think I would tell
him more than he needed too know~! ;) :D

dirtykid
May 5, 2011, 05:24 PM
No and NO !! I would do just as i did, All of my co-workers are aware of my "carry" status and my feelings about RKBA but i never get up-in-their-grill about it so it's all good.
Awhile back there was discussion of the legallity of an employer not allowing employees to keep their guns in locked cars in employee parking lot, so I reviewed the employee manual and noted the lack of ANY reference to handgun-posession so I mentioned to the office "controller" that im a member of a gun forum and this very subject was brought up for discussion and noticed WE did not have any "rules" regarding this subject. He responded with a "I'll check into it"
Well, that was months ago and no answer so far, which in my opinion is a good answer.
I continue to carry-concealed and mind my manners and figure i'll deal with it IF a problem comes up,, short of a ND I dont foresee any..
Our company El-presidenta is Republician,but doesnt hunt or anything like that,so im gonna assume if i keep my ducks in a row,,,, All's good !!

hermannr
May 5, 2011, 06:12 PM
ScottieG59...your wife doesn't like guns? If you do not already have, obtain a .22 pistol and take her to the range with you. She may find that shooting is fun.

My wife is a my hunting partner, and she bugs me to go to the range now, especially after I purchased a top drawer .22 target pistol for HER!

Sgt.Murtaugh
May 5, 2011, 06:17 PM
that's his problem, not yours. it's not any of his business

dirtykid
May 5, 2011, 09:11 PM
ScittieG59, I foresee a divorce-attorney on your horizon, couldnt imagine not having my wife cover my 6,alot of times when im yote-hunting i get so tunnel-visioned i miss some obvious movement which she picks out right away cause she's just there for the scenery !
The whole fam has to be aware of guns and their proper use/safety,EVEN IF you are the only one that carries ! what if you and attacker are struggling ? would she just stand there and wait for police ? sorry to get off subject but had to put in my .02 worth .

dcdub
May 5, 2011, 09:23 PM
Get that out of your head, dude. Do the legal thing without remorse. In NC, we have a duty to inform and a state trooper will enforce that. They don't play. If you hesitate and try to mention it to him quietly so that your bos/FIL won't notice...you're breaking the law AND you're making a guy with a gun who is already possibly nervous even more nervous. That's bad voodoo.

I think you misunderstood me. The thought of not telling an officer in the event that I was pulled over never crossed my mind.

Also, assuming you have all the paperwork to CCW, how would he find out even if you get pulled over? Why would you show him the ticket?

He's usually with me in the truck. I'm not worried about him seeing the ticket, I'm worried about him hearing me inform the officer I have a firearm on me, which we are obliged to do in NC.

Unless he has some very profitable business you are interested in, and have well founded designs on taking it over one day, I would likely seek employment elsewhere.

That's pretty much exactly the case, actually. I'm just riding out the storm...;)

And for those who replied to my comment about him being an extremely conservative Christian, I'm talking about a different kind of Christian, one of the types Sam1911 mentioned. But let's not go into that...

Thanks for the replies. I still have a lot to think about. If only you guys knew him, then you would really understand my predicament... He's unlike anyone I've ever know before...

I'm tossing around just carrying some pepper spray. I think most SD situations I might encounter while at work would occur on the road, which can usually be avoided with a little situational awareness and, of course, having a larger vehicle than 97% of people on the road, which we do. :D

gym
May 5, 2011, 09:47 PM
Everyone is different, it's your decision to make as you will suffer the consequences.

-eaux-
May 5, 2011, 10:55 PM
as Hank would say, "if you mind your business then you won't be minding mine."
i really don't get the train of thought that being a conservative Christian would predispose anyone to not defend himself or those under his charge from a violent threat.

jon_in_wv
May 5, 2011, 11:00 PM
+1 don't tell him.

+1 Being a Christian has NOTHING to do with believing in self defense/CCW. I'm a conservative Christian myself and I rarely leave the house unarmed. If EVERYBODY were Christians, I wouldn't need to.

dcdub
May 5, 2011, 11:55 PM
Read Sam1911's post above. I don't agree with it, obviously no one on this forum does either, but there are certain Christain sects that believe it is unacceptable to take a human life under any circumstances. That's not the issue anyway.

9MMare
May 6, 2011, 01:40 AM
(I did not yet read the entire thread)

For starters, does he have/is there a policy for employees regarding possessing weapons at work and/or while driving for work?

If not, IMO no you should not inform. You sound like it's assumed you are doing something wrong. If so, what would that be? If you have a carry permit and are following the laws (except for that accidental traffic infraction :-/ )....what's wrong?

(I dont know how it works in your state, but here it comes up when they run your plate. I've been pulled over 3 times since I had my permit and none of those times was a firearm mentioned. And we are under no obligation to bring it up.)

If your employer is bothered by it, explain that it is your normal everyday habit, like your cell phone, it's legal, and you had no reason to think that it would be viewed negatively. All that is honest, or may be slightly different for each individual.

And if you do have workplace guidelines against carrying, then IMO, you shouldnt be.


Note: Those 3 times I was pulled over were for 2: headlight out, 1: expired tabs ;-)

9MMare
May 6, 2011, 01:44 AM
If you really feel you must carry while at work you should ask him how he feels about it...

Why?

9MMare
May 6, 2011, 01:49 AM
Your employer has a right to know if you're carrying a gun during the course of company business. He could be held liable if you had a ND or...

He can also be held liable if you accidentally stab someone, or run them over, or drop something heavy on someone, or .....there are many hypotheticals that can occur, some very strange and random.....his insurance should cover them. If firearms affected his coverage, he'd probably have a policy stating so either way.

I really dont understand why things are so different regarding 'guns,' and why the assumption is that ...even we here....seem to consider them 'bad.'

MikeNice
May 6, 2011, 06:06 AM
If there is no stated policy then carry. The only reason you are worried is because you know the guy. If you worked as auditor 303 at Blanchard and Sullivan accounting would it matter?

You have to keep business and personal seperate. If there is no stated rule against it in the SOPs or GOs then don't worry about it.

Sav .250
May 6, 2011, 08:47 AM
If and when the time comes.............just man up !

dodgensince74
May 6, 2011, 08:50 AM
Why?


Because he's a grown man not a little kid anymore, if your going to be man enough to carry then be man enough to find out from your boss if its ok. I would ask him while I was not carring, all the boss can say is, no it's not or yes it is ok for him to carry on the job. The op already knows what the right thing to do is or he wouldn't be here asking what he should do.

Sam1911
May 6, 2011, 09:00 AM
Because he's a grown man not a little kid anymore, if your going to be man enough to carry then be man enough to find out from your boss if its ok. I would ask him while I was not carring, all the boss can say is, no it's not or yes it is ok for him to carry on the job. The op already knows what the right thing to do is or he wouldn't be here asking what he should do. Pretty loaded statement. If you're going to be "man enough" to carry, you should be "man enough" to go ask permission? How about you should be "man enough" not to need to ask anyone what they think of it?

The idea that anyone who bothers to ask others how to handle a situation must already know the answer seems absurd on its face.

ForumSurfer
May 6, 2011, 09:04 AM
Because he's a grown man not a little kid anymore, if your going to be man enough to carry then be man enough to find out from your boss if its ok. I would ask him while I was not carring, all the boss can say is, no it's not or yes it is ok for him to carry on the job. The op already knows what the right thing to do is or he wouldn't be here asking what he should do.

As a grown man, he shouldn't need to ask permission on exercising his right to carry. As a grown man, he shouldn't need to announce that he is exercising any right as he is exercising said right.

I carry where legal, period. I don't announce it or ask permission. It is no different with an employer. I've always worked for companies with well laid out policies. If carrying isn't specifically forbade, then I am within my legal right to do so without having to ask for permission. If management disapproves, they should write a policy.

The fact that his FIL is his boss changes a few things. But after reviewing the situation, I'd stick with concealed means concealed. Sam's quote about forgiveness being easier to obtain than permission seems to apply here.

Sam1911
May 6, 2011, 09:06 AM
(That was Owen's. I just suggested that asking forgiveness after a self-defense incident was preferrable to having your wife mourn your untimely death.)

Jeff F
May 6, 2011, 09:43 AM
Man, I haven't been pulled over or had an interaction with LE for over 15 years and I commute 110 miles round trip every day during the week plus some some driving at work. I live way out, closest major grocery store is 15 miles away in Fernley. I'd just keep quite about it and deal with it if it ever comes up.

arcticap
May 6, 2011, 12:54 PM
There's a conflict between 2 opposing priorities:

The first is that you've already been carrying for a length of time for the defense of yourself and others should the need arise. So you have the experience of what you've been doing.

The second is that you're concerned about whether that's going to impact your relationship with your FIL, your job and your future financial well-being.

You've stated that the conflict can't be resolved without jeopardizing one or the other and that now you need to decide what you should do.

So now you need to figure out which priority is more important to you. You're here, you know why you carry and what your legal rights are. You know whether your gun interferes with your job or not, and with your future relationship.
Have you talked this over with your wife?
What did she recommend that you do?
Either a person feels like they need to carry or they don't.
Carrying might be more important to you and it might not.
And your future job might depend on it and it might not.

I don't think that you should flip a coin to decide.
I think that you should ask yourself if you really enjoy carrying, if you really feel safer when carrying on the job, and if you really prefer to continue carrying while on the job or not.

No one can resolve that conflict for you but you.
It's totally personal preference whether it's worth it to continue carrying on the job or not.
I don't know how much of your financial future is at stake or not.
You might not really know yourself.
But you should decide based on your true feelings about carrying and not as much about what could happen to your financial future.

One's life and limb and how far one wants to go to protect it on a daily basis while working is the first question to consider.
Then the financial future is considered next.
One must be ranked before another.
It just like the dichotomy of do I go with my head or with my heart?
If you go with your head and your heart aches, then you'd be better off following you heart.
But if you only have a little headache, then maybe it's not such a big deal.
But that's what it appears to be your burden to resolve.
Whatever you do, just make sure that you feel good doing it.
If it doesn't feel good then something is wrong with the logic of the decision. :)

Superpsy
May 6, 2011, 01:23 PM
No...

IlikeSA
May 6, 2011, 01:38 PM
There have been some very good points made from both sides here. However, I would start looking for another job while continuing to work and carry. I certainly would not want to work for my father in law as that mixes business and personal life. It is a lot easier to get a job when you have a job.

As one who carried, and continues to carry while working, that would be my advice to you. Don't say anything about it, but always have a back up plan if something bad happens (which is why you should be looking for another job.)

mrbro
May 6, 2011, 02:31 PM
Well said arcticap, well said indeed.

SSN Vet
May 6, 2011, 03:17 PM
It is a company vehicle, and I am on the clock, so I feel like I should respect his wishes. However, there is no company policy regarding firearms, so I'm not doing anything wrong.
And NC we must inform.

So what kind of business is this?

Are you stepping onto the customers private property while carrying a concealed weapon?

If the answer is yes, I think you have a responsibility to ask your boss (regardless of whether of not he's your FIL) if it's copacetic or not. And I suspect you already know what the answer is going to be.

As a grown man, he shouldn't need to ask permission on exercising his right to carry. As a grown man, he shouldn't need to announce that he is exercising any right as he is exercising said right.

If you carried concealed onto a customers private property / place of business and are made, and the customer raises a stink and takes their business somewhere else, the question will change to whether or not you can carry while standing in the unemployment line.

But it's not just your livelihood that your messing around with.

razorback2003
May 6, 2011, 06:33 PM
If you are legally licensed and following the law, I would not bring up carrying a handgun to your employer if you are carrying the handgun to work. Nothing good can come out of that. It is best to keep that a secret that only you know about. Concealed well works best in many ways.

I work for myself and wouldn't tell customers/clients when I go in their businesses or homes and I carry a gun all the time. What is hidden on me is my business. A snub or little 32/380 automatic fits right in for carrying for work protection.

Sorry didn't see you were working for family when I first read this. That adds another element. Carrying is a personal call you've got to make. In some states, you can't get unemployment if you are fired for some reasons, like you get fired because you violated policies but were still following the law. Say they have a 'no gun' policy at your work, your boss sees you with a gun, fires you for carrying a gun when boss says you can't, then you have a tough time getting unemployment.
On the flip side, it is hard to work if you are seriously hurt or killed by a criminal! That's why I said to conceal a small handgun well and don't tell anyone and honestly don't talk about guns at all at work or gun politics. It might be ok to be a hunter but don't make folks think you are carrying.

EddieNFL
May 6, 2011, 07:48 PM
I think he may be of the opinion, as a highly conservative Christian, that one should never take the life of another human being, even to save your own life or a family member's

Why do you think he believes that?

I've read of a few liberal Christian groups that hold such beliefs, but I'm not aware of any conservative groups that feel the same. They may exist, but I would think it's a rarity.

One conservative Christian I grew up with shot a crackhead multiple times defending his family. I can't think of a Christian friend who would not.

9MMare
May 6, 2011, 11:14 PM
Because he's a grown man not a little kid anymore, if your going to be man enough to carry then be man enough to find out from your boss if its ok. I would ask him while I was not carring, all the boss can say is, no it's not or yes it is ok for him to carry on the job. The op already knows what the right thing to do is or he wouldn't be here asking what he should do.

That's fine if that's the way you think.

I personally dont get it (altho I know alot of anti-gun people feel that guns are bad).

I do not assume that guns are bad or that people are automatically against them. Also, because I'm within the law carrying it, and know of no employer-based regulations...why would I assume it's BAD????? It's a *right *(unless specified otherwise)....why should it be perceived as BAD?

I do not get that.

Why is it not ok? If he had insurance requirements re: firearms, likely he'd have policies supporting that.

gbw
May 7, 2011, 12:35 AM
Yes, I think you do. Ethically you must tell him and then abide by his wishes while working. It's his business, his vehicle, his liability, his risk, you are his agent, and he has the right to make an informed decision. He's been remiss to not adopt a formal policy, but that really doesn't change anything.

If he says no, then you have to make a decision to be unarmed during work hours or find another job.

9MMare
May 7, 2011, 02:35 AM
Yes, I think you do. Ethically you must tell him and then abide by his wishes while working. It's his business, his vehicle, his liability, his risk, you are his agent, and he has the right to make an informed decision. He's been remiss to not adopt a formal policy, but that really doesn't change anything.

.

Can you explain why? He has no policy and you have a CC permit that means a) 'concealed' and b) you may exercise that right anywhere the law allows.

Ethically, I would feel that I dont have to tell him. You do, can you explain why?

It seems to imply carrying a gun is wrong, or carrying concealed is wrong. Or that we're doing something wrong. That's the part I dont get. Apologies if I'm putting words in your mouth, your view may be something different.

MikeNice
May 7, 2011, 03:54 AM
Yes, I think you do. Ethically you must tell him and then abide by his wishes while working. It's his business, his vehicle, his liability, his risk, you are his agent, and he has the right to make an informed decision. He's been remiss to not adopt a formal policy, but that really doesn't change anything.

If he says no, then you have to make a decision to be unarmed during work hours or find another job.


He has absolutely no ethical imperative to tell his boss (or his FIL) that he is carrying. The right to keep and bare arms is a fundamental right. He does not have to tell the boss any more than he has to tell his boss he voted or who he voted for.

Carrying a gun puts his boss/fil at no more risk than his driving the company vehicle. In fact there is a better chance that he will hurt somebody with the car than with his gun. If he keeps a small .32 tucked away in a pocket holster the chances of losing a client are next to nill. If he hasn't told his fil I am sure he is smart enough not to blab about it to clients. So, they will never know.

Most importantly though, it is the duty of the property/business owner to tell you when they don't want guns around. If CCH holders had to stop and ask every property owner for permission it would cause an impediment to carrying by adding an excessive hinderance to acomplishing everyday task.

If a store isn't posted do you ask to speak to the manager on duty? Do you ask him if it is acceptable to carry? No you don't. We expect the owners to tell us when they don't want us to carry. It is the same in most social interactions. There is a basic set of guidlines people are expected to follow (the social contract) past that it is up to the other person to tell us what guidlines they have. It is their duty to tell us when they feel they have been offended or transgressed against.

Usmc-1
May 7, 2011, 09:18 AM
Man up and tell the old man ! Its your life if he doesnt understand , move on!

TexasBill
May 7, 2011, 09:55 AM
Why don't you just tell him you would like to carry? Overlook the fact you have been carrying and make it look like you're being up front? Of course, heaven help you if he already figured out you were carrying and just didn't say anything.

A far as being a conservative (or any other kind of) Christian, a lot has been made of Jesus and the Disciples' swords. Whatever Jesus may or may not have said, the fact remains that the Bible says the Disciples were, in fact, armed and Jesus seemed to be okay with it. He got upset with Peter over using his sword but we don't know if it was in that particular instance or as a more general rule. Jesus just told Peter to put the sword away and healed the servant's ear.

I only bring that up to point out that Christians have many views on weapons for self-defense, and it's unwise to pre-judge a person until you know more about their personal faith.

Zach S
May 7, 2011, 08:45 PM
Well said, MikeNice.

Anyway, your CHP is linked to your driver's license. So, if you get stopped, you either have to tell the officer that you have your CHP and you're not armed, or, the officer will return from his car and, if he's nice guy in a good mood, say something like "I noticed you have your CHP, are you armed at the moment?" If they are likely to hold the firearm for their safety, he could come back with a completely different attitude...

Weather you are armed at the time of the stop or not, if you even get stopped, the cat is coming out of the bag.

So, here is what I would change if I were in your situation:
Nothing. I would continue to carry, and leave my boss out of the loop.

NMGonzo
May 7, 2011, 09:01 PM
The 5th amendment is there for something ...

9MMare
May 7, 2011, 09:05 PM
Zach S, like I wrote, I've been stopped 3 times (twice, 2 days in a row, for a headlight out & once for overdue tabs) since having my permit and not once did the officer mention my CPL, which does show up when they run my plates.

(One did however, nod at my hands which remained on the steering wheel, say thanks. But that's all, just 'thanks.')

Zach S
May 7, 2011, 09:27 PM
With all due respect, in the same previous post you mentioned being stopped three times, you also said you didn't know how its works here.

I was born and raised here. And in my experience, if you don't tell the officer you have your CHP because you aren't armed, he WILL ask about it.

9MMare
May 7, 2011, 10:57 PM
Sorry Zach, my post was just supposed to be a counterpoint to yours where you said the police would definitely ask. Not all states or cops will, but since you share a location in common with the OP, perhaps he would experience what you do.

In some states, you are even required by law to inform the police. I take it NC doesnt require that, from the sound of it.

Merkules
May 8, 2011, 01:24 AM
Side note, certain states like Indiana have passed laws stating your employer can not refuse you to carry to and from work. You have to lock it in your car if your employer states you can't carry while on duty. If your employer refuses you having it on their property (parking lot), then they are 100% liable for your safety to and from work.

ForumSurfer
May 8, 2011, 01:33 AM
Side note, certain states like Indiana have passed laws stating your employer can not refuse you to carry to and from work. You have to lock it in your car if your employer states you can't carry while on duty. If your employer refuses you having it on their property (parking lot), then they are 100% liable for your safety to and from work.

The OP lives in NC. There is no such law here (unfortunately).

Guns and more
May 8, 2011, 11:04 PM
Should I Inform My Employer That I CC?
Not if you like your job.

SSN Vet
May 9, 2011, 10:48 AM
so it's been 5 days....

Please share with us what you have decided to do? And if you talked to your FIL, how he responded.

leadcounsel
May 9, 2011, 02:19 PM
Nope. It's your personal business.

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