New Brass


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john bh
May 8, 2011, 12:39 AM
I just recieved some new brass ,Starline. Before reloading
do you need to resize.

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918v
May 8, 2011, 12:56 AM
Depends on the caliber. I had to size my 454 brass.

788Ham
May 8, 2011, 01:02 AM
Just to be safe, I'd re-size it. Just FL, bell, if pistol or revolver. FL size if rifle, just to make sure they're all the same before loading.

Steve Koski
May 8, 2011, 01:09 AM
It's good practice to size it. It may not always be necessary though.

The few times I've loaded new brass, I sized it.

Koski

Otto
May 8, 2011, 01:11 AM
Here's your answer:
http://www.starlinebrass.com/faqs.php?osCsid=c2f7274ad72a4a0f8b1dc99c59c103ce

Sunray
May 8, 2011, 01:15 AM
Yes. Despite what Starline says. New rifle brass needs to be sized, checked for length, trimmed as required and chamfered and deburred.

jem375
May 8, 2011, 01:15 AM
I have yet to resize new brass with no problems whatsoever.

arizona98tj
May 8, 2011, 01:46 AM
Yes. Despite what Starline says. New rifle brass needs to be sized, checked for length, trimmed as required and chamfered and deburred.


Do all of the major manufacturers do this too when loading new ammo? Remington, Winchester, CCI, etc.?

Otto
May 8, 2011, 02:38 AM
Never FL size NEW brass. It's already sized too small to begin with. If you run it through a FL die it can and will push the shoulder back even farther. This will create more excess HS and the brass will have to stretch even futher to fit your chamber. Optimal sizing can not be accomplished without fire forming first.
If you feel that you must molest the virgin brass, neck size only.

ironhead7544
May 8, 2011, 03:14 AM
If the brass fits in the chamber then no real reason to size it as long as it will hold the bullet tightly enough. Neck size certainly wouldnt hurt.

ljnowell
May 8, 2011, 03:25 AM
I always have. the nickel 45colt I bought from starline wouldnt hold a bullet without doing it. I dont want to even talk about the new winchester brass, it was horrible out of the bag.

StretchNM
May 8, 2011, 03:49 AM
I do not resize new brass (as long as it is a reputable brand - Winchester, Remington, Lapua, Hornady, etc.). It was sized before it came to you. I will however check each one for dented case mouths (and neck size those) and sometimes chamfer the case mouth if that lot is overly rough.

You can check a few in your rifle's chamber. They'll all fit fine unless you have an overly tight chamber.

DANNY-L
May 8, 2011, 08:09 AM
Rifle brass I always resize and trim so that I know they are te same,although it may not be necessary.

gamestalker
May 8, 2011, 08:12 AM
I always resize and trim new brass because it never seems to be very close dimensionally.

Grumulkin
May 8, 2011, 09:23 AM
You have to be very careful when you buy new brass or new factory made ammo because the makers of brass and ammo don't know what they're doing. By all means, ALWAYS size and trim new brass and, for those times you aren't rolling your own, disassemble any new cartridges you buy and:

1. Weigh the powder to be sure all the charges are within 0.01 grain of each other. You know, sometimes the manufacturers screw things up and have to have ammo recalls.

2. Resize and trim the cases because they may not be dimensionally correct.

3. Weigh all the bullets and measure them as well. Discard all bullets that are more than 0.001 grains off the weight they're supposed to be. Also, trash all bullets that are more than 0.002 inches shorter or longer than they're supposed to be.

4. Then put the powder back in the cases and reseat your bullets. You will rest happy knowing your cases and bullets are dimensionally correct and the powder charges are correct.

Do these things and your life will be much better and safer.

Walkalong
May 8, 2011, 09:42 AM
I like to size new brass simply for the reason it will be sized with your die the next time you reload it. I want it to be the same as the first loading.

I also like to trim after sizing (If I am going to trim), as well as deburr and chamfer new brass.

I sized, chamfered, and deburred 200 S&W Long brass Fri/Sat. I am going to leave it untrimmed. Although I normally trim revolver brass, the Starline brass is pretty uniform case length wise, and I will be shooting it in a Benelli MP3-S.

jem375
May 8, 2011, 11:52 AM
You have to be very careful when you buy new brass or new factory made ammo because the makers of brass and ammo don't know what they're doing. By all means, ALWAYS size and trim new brass and, for those times you aren't rolling your own, disassemble any new cartridges you buy and:

1. Weigh the powder to be sure all the charges are within 0.01 grain of each other. You know, sometimes the manufacturers screw things up and have to have ammo recalls.

2. Resize and trim the cases because they may not be dimensionally correct.

3. Weigh all the bullets and measure them as well. Discard all bullets that are more than 0.001 grains off the weight they're supposed to be. Also, trash all bullets that are more than 0.002 inches shorter or longer than they're supposed to be.

4. Then put the powder back in the cases and reseat your bullets. You will rest happy knowing your cases and bullets are dimensionally correct and the powder charges are correct.

Do these things and your life will be much better and safer.
Good one....lol.... I guess some of the posters don't think the manufacturers know what they are doing.. I always take the facts of internet arm chair computer experts over manufacturers...lol

john bh
May 8, 2011, 12:43 PM
I read somewhere when there being transported.When deliverying, sometimes the head of the case can be bent or distoted. You don't have to resize the full case, just enough so the head is sized. If your doing just the head, might as well do the whole case. The cases are for 45 acp.

snuffy
May 8, 2011, 12:48 PM
Never FL size NEW brass. It's already sized too small to begin with. If you run it through a FL die it can and will push the shoulder back even farther.

Sure, if you have the FL die set incorrectly AND you push the shell into the die all the way. I back the FL die out one full turn, then run the case into the die. This makes sure the mouth is round. Try chamfering a bent case mouth, then take a good look at the results. Um you DO chamfer new brass,,,---right? I also check length and trim if necessary.

This will create more excess HS and the brass will have to stretch even further to fit your chamber.

Again, if your FL die isn't set right, you'll set back the shoulder.

Optimal sizing can not be accomplished without fire forming first.
If you feel that you must molest the virgin brass, neck size only.

Case prep is molesting? Where does the idea come from that new brass is ready to shoot right out of the bag? The only ones that come close is Lapua or Norma. Nosler brass IS all prepped, but you pay for it, and I can do it myself, then I know it's done right.

Do as you want to, but don't say the rest of us are doing something wrong.

snuffy
May 8, 2011, 12:53 PM
I read somewhere when there being transported.When delivering, sometimes the head of the case can be bent or distorted.

The "head" of the case is where you'll find the primer and headstamp. You are talking about the mouth or neck of the case. Pardon me for being a stickler for proper terminology.:uhoh:

BUT that is a good point. The mouth of bulk packed cases is seldom round. You MUST have it round so you can UNIFORMLY inside chamfer the mouth.

Walkalong
May 8, 2011, 03:20 PM
This question always gets interesting.

Grumulkin is pulling our leg of course, cause he thinks sizing new brass is a waste of time. It certainly does not need to be sized to work, 99% of the time anyway.

I still like to do it. :)

Waywatcher
May 8, 2011, 05:00 PM
I size it.

With rifle rounds I also measure the headspace to make sure I don't bump the shoulder very far; typically only 0.001 to 0.002. Tightening the die down until it cams over usually bumps the shoulder back about 0.005 with my dies, (on virgin brass,) so I don't do that.

jfdavis58
May 8, 2011, 05:42 PM
Lotsa laughs, could have been an April first thread--thanks to all!

arizona98tj
May 8, 2011, 06:40 PM
Yes. Despite what Starline says. New rifle brass needs to be sized, checked for length, trimmed as required and chamfered and deburred.


Do all of the major manufacturers do this too when loading new ammo? Remington, Winchester, CCI, etc.?

Lots of responses about the need to resize brand new brass.

So....does Remington, Winchester, etc. resize their brass before they load it for commercial sale? It's probably safe to say their brass is bulk delivered.

john bh
May 9, 2011, 01:23 AM
I worked in the Medical for 32 yrs, repairing Dialysis machines. Your right you should use right terminology. I,m retired and and not into that anymore.When I say something that not politically correct :)always tell my wife whoms a Speacial Ed teacher in High School , you know what I'm talking about....lol

ljnowell
May 9, 2011, 03:28 AM
Just want to point out to some of the poeple here making facetious remarks regarding resizing it, you are not always right. As I posted above, I have had both Winchester AND Starline brass that needed resized in 45 colt. Neither would hold a .452" bullet. In most cases yes, but only a fool speaks in absolutes, eventually it will make you look foolish.

USSR
May 9, 2011, 11:15 AM
Never FL size NEW brass. It's already sized too small to begin with. If you run it through a FL die it can and will push the shoulder back even farther. This will create more excess HS and the brass will have to stretch even futher to fit your chamber.

Huh? If it's already too small (and in the case of bottleneck cartridges, they are - they are about what you would get using a small-base sizing die), then sizing with a regular FL sizing die will only resize your neck without even touching the body and shoulder. Actually, resizing the neck is a good idea (at least with the Lapua brass I have bought), as they tend to be too tight. So, if you feel you must resize new brass, go ahead. Just be aware that you will not be changing the case headspace on new brass.

Don

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