Some pics of my Ruger SR1911


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Nakanokalronin
May 10, 2011, 02:02 AM
Some side shots and pics of the internals. MIM parts include: The entire FCG, grip safey, slide stop,MSH and thumb safety. It seems they used either tool steel or barstock for the firing pin stop and mag catch. All in all it seems like a very well put together 1911. Taking it down to bare bones was a breeze and is all 1911 inside and out. The titanium firing pin is also recess cut to make it even lighter. The grip emblems have a post that goes all the way to the back of the panels so no worries about them falling off. Thought I'd include a sneak shot of my shoes to show a human being took the pics. http://www.ar15.com/images/smilies/icon_smile_wink.gif

http://img703.imageshack.us/img703/1185/sr19112.jpg
http://img685.imageshack.us/img685/329/sr19111.jpg
http://img707.imageshack.us/img707/5454/sr19113.jpg
http://img28.imageshack.us/img28/5883/sr19114.jpg

I have a solid aluminum trigger that's been waiting for this to arrive. I'm changing it only because I like a solid trigger or a the 3 hole type. Other than that one change, its staying stock. Just need to clean off the factory oil, relube and get to the range. Not sure when the range trip will be but I'll post a new thread with the report.

Here it is with the solid trigger...ahhh better. :cool:

http://img585.imageshack.us/img585/5454/sr19113.jpg

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918v
May 10, 2011, 03:44 AM
Why would Ruger buy MIM equipment when it is perfectly capable of casting small parts as it does for the other semi-auto models?

1858
May 10, 2011, 03:52 AM
MIM parts include: The entire FCG, grip safey, slide stop,MSH and thumb safety. It seems they used either tool steel or barstock for the firing pin stop and mag catch.

I would think that the grip safety and MSH are cast rather than MIM. Also, I would expect the hammer, hammer strut, disconnector and sear to be MIM too given the price of the Ruger. Are you saying that the mag release isn't MIM? I would expect it to be MIM. It would be useful to see some closeup images of those parts to see if there are any parting lines, gate or sprue marks.

1858
May 10, 2011, 04:13 AM
Why would Ruger buy MIM equipment when it is perfectly capable of casting small parts as it does for the other semi-auto models?

Large parts such as the frame, grip safety and MSH work well when cast, but small parts don't work so well. MIM is a better choice for small, intricate parts where strength and hardness are important, particularly when trying to reduce cost. It's often difficult to find out exactly which parts are MIM and which are not. Some parts are obviously MIM but others may have additional finishing making them harder to identify.

I'd like to see some definitive information as to which parts are MIM and which are not.

Nakanokalronin
May 10, 2011, 04:16 AM
The MSH may be cast or MIM. There is defiantly a mark where metal is injected buts its too obscure to see. When I said "FCG" I meant disconnector, sear and hammer. All the parts have the clear as day distinct circle marks of MIM. The gun is back together for a range trip but I'll tear it down and take some pics incase others doubt. Its really not surprising considering the price Ruger is charging for it.

Nakanokalronin
May 10, 2011, 04:40 AM
http://a3.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/144/fa1c97c250f74d3baa9b604c401b720f/l.jpg
http://a3.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/133/46337b6de4a64be7ba188f68d8de3358/l.jpg
http://a4.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/143/82807472826a4724b3e4ef1e5c44bf35/l.jpg
http://a3.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/129/7c79248fa0374c02b6424ea2f86e3ba2/l.jpg
http://a4.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/139/07c21aeea855442d8dddd0cb27028dd2/l.jpg

Nakanokalronin
May 10, 2011, 04:42 AM
http://a4.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/131/366fa7d0090f4390845472af0f668330/l.jpg
http://a3.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/134/f6e6133e2e2f4239891f69b4e48d602d/l.jpg
http://a2.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/133/cc31663971ee4970b10ce16082cd8998/l.jpg
http://a4.l3-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/150/f80d8c3fd5654f85b7b766bb1c17e5fb/l.jpg

Sorry, I can't get any better pics than that but the MIM circles are distinct enough on the parts. The mag catch looks exactly like the firing pin stop with no marks and the easy to make out grain in the metal which is why I know they are either both tool steel or barstock. I own eleven 1911s. Some with a few MIM parts, some with many MIM parts and some with zero MIM parts so I know what to look for.

1858
May 10, 2011, 05:00 AM
Nakanokalronin, based on your photos, don't you think it looks like the thumb safety, slide stop, hammer, grip safety and MSH are all cast? You're right, the mag release doesn't look like a MIM part.

Nakanokalronin
May 10, 2011, 05:08 AM
No, because the cast parts would and do have a rough texture either at the casting point or on a hidden side like something towards the frame. When the gun is apart its very apartment that the frame is cast. This is why the MSH may be cast because of the obscure circle while the other parts have a more crisp injection circle mark on them just like Kimbers and other 1911s that use MIM through out.

I'm really not concerned with the casting or MIM in the SR1911 since Ruger has been doing casting for a long time and have been making parts for other 1911 manufactures for years.

Husker_Fan
May 10, 2011, 10:37 AM
Looks good.

918v
May 10, 2011, 11:12 AM
Large parts such as the frame, grip safety and MSH work well when cast, but small parts don't work so well.

But Ruger, to date, cast all their small parts for their other semi-auto models. The Ruger 22 uses cast small parts, the P85, 89, 90, 94, SR9 ets all use cast small parts. There is no reason to go MIM for the 1911.

Injection circles don't mean the part is MIM, necessarily.

Husker_Fan
May 10, 2011, 11:20 AM
MIM parts get a bad rap and can be very good these days. Casting small parts can also be more expensive with higher rates of voids in these small parts. Ruger probably cast these parts in the past because of the quality difference. Now there is little if any quality difference so they use MIM parts in the new gun. I imagine they'll continue to use cast parts in some other guns since they already have the tooling.

1KPerDay
May 10, 2011, 11:37 AM
Injection circles don't mean the part is MIM, necessarily.
:confused:

918v
May 10, 2011, 11:50 AM
Maybe you should read-up on casting processes.

Smaug
May 10, 2011, 12:23 PM
I don't know why 1911 folks always get so caught up in materials. Either it works well, it works poorly, or it doesn't work.

If it works well, and you KNOW Ruger's going to stand behind their product, why is there all this concern over whether it is cast, forged, or MIM?

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 12:26 PM
I don't know why 1911 folks always get so caught up in materials. Either it works well, it works poorly, or it doesn't work.

If it works well, and you KNOW Ruger's going to stand behind their product, why is there all this concern over whether it is cast, forged, or MIM?

Maybe for the same reason some people prefer a Lexus over a Hyundai ... :p

To the OP thanks for the pics. The jury is still out on this one. I believe it will be a good seller and decent shooter. I however cannot tell from the pics if Ruger went cast or MIM on the small parts. It would not surprise me if they outsourced the small parts if they are MIM. It would make a lot more sense than buying the MIM equipment.

Dobe
May 10, 2011, 12:31 PM
Unless they intend to get into the MIM business as well.

Smaug
May 10, 2011, 12:42 PM
rellascout: I was not aware that Hyundai would fix a car at no charge, years later if there are issues...

Great analogy, it is exactly the same thing, and I just didn't realize it! Cars are just like guns, they're no more complex or expensive. Silly me.

19-3Ben
May 10, 2011, 12:47 PM
I think you're taking rellascout's analogy a little too far there Smaug. I think he simply meant that some people are willing to pay more for higher quality (or at least perception of higher quality).
The analogy doesn't have to match perfectly in every single way to be valid.

____________________________
I'm editing to add that I have nothing against MIM parts. If I decide to take that 1911 plunge that I've been putting off, the SR1911 is going to be the one for me. Kudos to the OP on an awesome gun.

Dryft
May 10, 2011, 12:54 PM
Say what you will regarding MIM vs everything else, you've got a beautiful gun there OP, and I wish you luck with it! I'm certainly looking forward to picking one up.

NOLA-5.56
May 10, 2011, 01:09 PM
what the heck is MIM?

Dobe
May 10, 2011, 01:16 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal_injection_molding

Cheaper than casting

ohwell
May 10, 2011, 01:34 PM
I like the trigger change I'm ordering a medium length C & S solid match trigger for mine. You'll love taking it to the range, mine shoots as good as it looks. Don't forget to take advantage of the 20% off deal you get from the Ruger store on magazines and spare parts when you register it.

Smaug
May 10, 2011, 01:40 PM
The end-product MIM metal has comparable mechanical and physical properties with parts made using classic metalworking methods, and MIM materials are compatible with the same subsequent metal conditioning treatments such as plating, passivating, annealing, carburizing, nitriding, and precipitation hardening.

So are people having their MIM parts actually fail on them, or they are just bitter because manufacturers are reducing manufacturing costs? (and passing the savings onto us)

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 01:44 PM
rellascout: I was not aware that Hyundai would fix a car at no charge, years later if there are issues...

Great analogy, it is exactly the same thing, and I just didn't realize it! Cars are just like guns, they're no more complex or expensive. Silly me.


Don't be obtuse. The anaology is spot on. A new Hyundai Sonata will come will all the bells and whistles which used to only come on luxury brands like Lexus. They have leather, nav, power everythind etc... they even do well on initial quality surveys.

The issue is that they are not built out of the same quality materials. Look at the same Sonata 3 years later and the quality surveys are not as good. They really fall behind at 5 years. As a result the Hyundai loses a ton of value after year 3. They are simply not yet built to last. They are built to approximate a luxury car at a avg car price. Does that sound familar... if not you should read it again.

The Lexus on the other hand holds its value. The quality of the craftsmanship really starts to shine after year 3. A Lexus with 100,000 on the clock is worth more than the Hyundai with 50,000.

Now that does not mean the Hyundai is a POS. It does not mean it does not serve its purpose. It does not mean it does not have market appeal. It simply means it is WHAT IT IS.

The exact same thing can be said about most Ruger guns. Do you want a GP100 or a Python? You asked a question and I answered it. YMMV

Walkalong
May 10, 2011, 01:45 PM
Injection circles don't mean the part is MIM, necessarily.Ruger has been using investment casting for years without problems. I can only assume they have marks (circles, lines, etc) on the parts unless polished off.

http://www.ruger.com/casting/index.html

If I was in the market for a 1911 in that price range I would not hesitate to buy a Ruger. It looks like a very nice addition to the 1911 market. I imagine they will sell a ton of them.

Congrats on a nice pistola. :)

mgmorden
May 10, 2011, 01:46 PM
I was not aware that Hyundai would fix a car at no charge, years later if there are issues...

Actually Hyundai/Kia has the best warranty in the business right now. 10 years or 100,000 miles.

They get a bad rap due to their early years when quality was a little more sketchy, but almost all modern Hyundai's are completely reliable cars. Heck their higher end models have about as many features as one can ask too. I drive a Hyundai that came pretty well stocked, but a coworker just bought a Kia that has heated seats, power doors/windows/seat, integrated dash GPS, rear backup video camera, full iPod integration - basically every nice feature I can possibly imagine it's got.

And my own Hyundai - sitting on 82k miles now without any maintenance that's not periodic (ie, oil, tires, wipers, etc).

As a matter of fact, a whole bunch of their vehicles are now being built in their assembly plant in Georgia (yes, the company is Korean but they have US plants).

So in that regard, I kinda hope the Ruger is like a Hyundai - priced competitively and just as reliable as anything else you might buy ;).

Personally, I'm going to wait until the initial demand dies down, but I'm definately getting an SR1911 this year. Probably October or so.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 01:54 PM
So are people having their MIM parts actually fail on them, or they are just bitter because manufacturers are reducing manufacturing costs? (and passing the savings onto us)

Do the research and you will find that there are plenty of failed MIM parts. Kimber comes to mind. Taurus & RIA thumb safties come to mind. Sig Sauer test several MIM parts some which failed in testing. IIRC For some parts MIM is not a big deal. For others it can be a castrophic failure.

SwampWolf
May 10, 2011, 01:57 PM
Thanks for sharing the great photos, Nakanokalronin. Very interesting and informative. I was able to handle one and inspect it up close at the NRA Convention in Pittsburgh (after waiting in line for ten minutes :)) and was very impressed with the quality and attention to detail this "entry" level Ruger 1911 exhibited. I'm going to hold out for an adjustable sight variant.

Let us know how your new Ruger shoots!

Smaug
May 10, 2011, 02:07 PM
Well, you're right, because my mileage does vary, hehehe.

I'm not debating that Lexus is a better car than Hyundai. What I'm debating is that Rugers are just as good combat guns as Colts. Maybe better. Rugers don't start to fall apart once they're out of warranty, like Hyundais do. Also, long term, Ruger supports their guns at no charge, whereas Colt charges an arm and a leg to support them, once they're out of warranty. You could compare this to Hyundai's warranty too, but that wouldn't be apt either. Hyundai warrants only the powertrain for the longer period. This is nice, because we know the powertrain is probably pretty solid. On the other hand, the powertrain is the last thing that will need work. My friend's Hyundai started to have all the non-powertrain stuff give troubles after 5 years. Dome lights kept burning out. Headlights burn out, and the only ones that give an acceptable service life are the Hyundai ones. (which aren't as bright) This type of thing sometimes happens with Rugers (the improperly manufactured frame on some early LCRs is a good example) But Ruger basically says: "Whoops. Our bad. Send us the gun and we'll send you a new one with no questions asked." Hynudai says: "Sorry, those electrical problems are not covered by the extended warranty. GOTCHA!!"

A more apt comparison would be Toyota vs. Lexus. They're both reliable and high quality. They will both last a long time. But the Lexus is built with more expensive materials, such as leather, and big V6 engines where Toyotas are made with less expensive, but equally serviceable materials, such as cloth and four cylinder engines. They're worth more later because they were worth more to begin with, and everything else is roughly equal.

Same with a Colt 1911 vs. a Ruger. Nicer materials, but not necessarily any more serviceable. There's a bit more to it because of Colt's supply & demand tricks and their longer history with the platform. Perceived value vs. serviceability.

I don't know about the 1911s yet, but from a long term serviceability stand point, I would put my old cast Ruger P90 against a forged Colt 1911 any day. Not as luxurious, but equally serviceable.

Same goes for revolvers. I would put my Redhawk against a S&W any day of the week. The Ruger may not "seem" as nice, but by God, that thing can keep going and going and perform well the whole time. The Smith loosens up and goes out of time, and the Ruger's still going strong without complaint.

Just be open-minded to the new technologies, is all I'm saying. It wasn't too long ago when a certain polymer-framed gun burst on the scene, and the nay-sayers eventually had to concede that they are just as serviceable, and admit that it is a preference issue and not a quality one.

Smaug
May 10, 2011, 02:10 PM
Do the research and you will find that there are plenty of failed MIM parts. Kimber comes to mind. Taurus & RIA thumb safties come to mind. Sig Sauer test several MIM parts some which failed in testing. IIRC For some parts MIM is not a big deal. For others it can be a castrophic failure.

Well, if that is the case, then I will have to concede the point.

Let's just say I have more faith in Ruger to get it right than I do in Taurus and Kimber. Ruger was the one who made casting a viable option. By doing it right.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 02:43 PM
I am not sure that we can say what Rugers 1911s will really be like under heavy use. Rember how bad Sig stumbled out of the gate. They had tons of trouble because building a 1911 is different that other guns. :p

1858
May 10, 2011, 03:21 PM
Injection circles don't mean the part is MIM, necessarily.

True ... and that's why after seeing detailed photos I said that the hammer, slide stop, thumb safety, grip safety and MSH look like they're cast rather than MIM. Cast parts typically have gates large enough to allow molten metal to be poured into the mold. Injection molding forces the material into the mold under pressure so the gates can be smaller. Perhaps this is why very small parts are hard to cast. The disconnector looks like it's MIM for sure but the sear is hard to see clearly. I hope a casting/MIM expert shows up because I doubt that Ruger will confirm either way.

Nakanokalronin, I'm not trying to find any faults with the Ruger. I like to know what I'm buying that's all. MIM has been proven to work and the Ruger will probably sell very well and prove to be a durable 1911. Personally, I don't want a MIM hammer, hammer strut, sear, disconnector, thumb safety or slide stop so if I buy a 1911 that has them, I'll simply swap them out for non-MIM parts as I did with my Kimber.

Nakanokalronin
May 10, 2011, 04:04 PM
Thanks for the replies everyone The only reason I mention the casting/MIM was because everyone was speculating what Ruger used in the SR1911. I have no problem with the parts since I have yet to have a cast/MIM part fail on me and I have some pretty high round count 1911s including Kimbers. Every part is fit very well.

The fact that the plunger tube is part of the frame is an excellent choice on Ruger's part which is something I'd like to see all manufactures do. The frame to slide fit is tight with only a hair's width of play if that. I'll try and get to the range A.S.A.P and post a report in a separate thread when I do.

mgmorden
May 10, 2011, 04:09 PM
A more apt comparison would be Toyota vs. Lexus. They're both reliable and high quality. They will both last a long time. But the Lexus is built with more expensive materials, such as leather, and big V6 engines where Toyotas are made with less expensive, but equally serviceable materials, such as cloth and four cylinder engines. They're worth more later because they were worth more to begin with, and everything else is roughly equal.

Toyota and Lexus are the same company ;). Lexus is their luxury line - Toyota is their budget line. Toyota to Lexus is more like comparing a Springfield GI45 and a Springfield Trophy Match.

Overall though, in recent years, IMHO the main differences between Toyota and Hyundai are the countries of origin and the names on them. Much like many pistol brands, the main people I hear bashing Hyundai have never driven nor owned one :).

I'm confident that the Ruger will hold up just fine.

ohwell
May 10, 2011, 04:16 PM
The SR1911 seems like a very good gun to me I like mine sometimes you just have to ignore the thread trolls that like to bash other products than what they prefer. They'd be better off served just commenting in the threads of guns they like.

aliasneo07
May 10, 2011, 04:19 PM
1911 noon here, but can you just replace the mim parts with aftermarket non mim parts?

mgmorden
May 10, 2011, 04:22 PM
1911 noon here, but can you just replace the mim parts with aftermarket non mim parts?

Yes, but sometimes 1911 parts require some handfitting to work in a new gun (sometimes they just drop in too - all depends). That's why I got rid of my last 1911 - it was a project gun that I couldn't make run right (it was darned accurate when it worked though :)). I'm hoping the Ruger makes a good replacement. I need something new to burn up the ~200 rounds of .45ACP I have left sitting in my ammo drawer anyways :).

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 06:18 PM
I love the mentality that anyone who does not praise a particular gun or brand is troll. I have not seen any bashing or trolling. What I see is people saying it is what it is.

Should we say everyone who praises it, wants one or owns one is fan boy?

Ben86
May 10, 2011, 06:20 PM
That gun looks excellent, thanks for posting pictures.

I think I'll be making one of those my first 1911. I was about to get a para, but if I can get a ruger for about the same price..

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 06:23 PM
100% Ruger over the Para.

ohwell
May 10, 2011, 06:30 PM
I can assure you scout I have not found anything wrong with my new SR1911 yet not even any hammer follow

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 06:37 PM
I can assure you scout I have not found anything wrong with my new SR1911 yet not even any hammer follow

Good for you. That would also be true for every single factory/stock 1911 I have ever owned. The one your comment is alluding to was a custom job which anyone who knows about 1911s can compromise long term reliability. One has to ask why you felt the need to bring that up? I guess your need to feel good about your choice in 1911s demanded it. If you like your Ruger why the need to lash out? <edit>

How many rounds have been through the Ruger?

<edit>

Resist Evil
May 10, 2011, 07:26 PM
Nakano, I will be looking forward to your range report. I appreciate your putting up the photos.

sideways
May 10, 2011, 07:38 PM
You know the major sell of this pistol to me is that is made in the USA not in some third world country by a twelve year old. Have a nice day.

1858
May 10, 2011, 07:49 PM
The fact that the plunger tube is part of the frame is an excellent choice on Ruger's part which is something I'd like to see all manufactures do.

It's easier and cheaper to do that when the frame is cast. Do you know of any forged frames that have integral plunger tubes?


ohwell, this is fact finding mission and no one here is trying to imply that the Ruger is an inferior product. It is what it is and seems to be very good value for money. We should all be able to discuss it openly and truthfully without any egos getting in the way.

Black Butte
May 10, 2011, 07:55 PM
The Lexus on the other hand holds its value. The quality of the craftsmanship really starts to shine after year 3. A Lexus with 100,000 on the clock is worth more than the Hyundai with 50,000.

The exact same thing can be said about most Ruger guns. Do you want a GP100 or a Python? You asked a question and I answered it.

Only problem is that the GP-100 will outlast the Python while digesting hotter rounds.

Nakanokalronin
May 10, 2011, 08:07 PM
1858: Not off the top of my head, just cast like the type from Caspian. Companies could do it to a forged frame but I would be willing to bet the ones that would do it might charge another $200 just for that one feature. I know there was a company that did it with an aluminum frame but I can't remember who.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 08:45 PM
Only problem is that the GP-100 will outlast the Python while digesting hotter rounds.

So what you are trying to say is if I offered to buy you one or the other you would choose the GP100? :neener:

ohwell
May 10, 2011, 09:02 PM
I think the main point of the thread is to show the build quality and features of the gun I really like the one I bought its very comfortable at least for me I have only about a 100 rounds through mine now but it has been accurate and flawless with both ball and hollowpoints. Theres an old saying the prettiest bride doesnt always make the best wife same goes for guns the most expensive arent always the best.

918v
May 10, 2011, 09:02 PM
A GP-100 will not outlast a properly maintained Python.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 09:18 PM
I think the main point of the thread is to show the build quality and features of the gun I really like the one I bought its very comfortable at least for me I have only about a 100 rounds through mine now but it has been accurate and flawless with both ball and hollowpoints. Theres an old saying the prettiest bride doesnt always make the best wife same goes for guns the most expensive arent always the best

Well 100 rounds I guess that settles the issue. You have really put it through its paces and we can all declare it durable and of the highest quality and build.... :scrutiny:

Seriously I shoot more than 100 rounds a range session out of my 1911s. It is great you like it but at 100 rounds really how would you know what you have. You are ready to make claims about its reliability and durability based on 100 rounds. All 1911s feel comfortable to me, with the exception of double stack hybrids but really that does not translate to anything meaningful. The difference in the hand between one 1911 and another is not what separates one from another. How they look doesn't either. How many other 1911s do you own and what are you comparing the Ruger to? I am not trying to be rude. I think the Ruger for what it is will sell well and serve many people well but lets not make it more than it is. Seriously?

PS I like pretty women and pretty guns... YMMV

Black Butte
May 10, 2011, 09:23 PM
So what you are trying to say is if I offered to buy you one or the other you would choose the GP100?

Nope, this is not what I said at all. What I did say was that unlike the Hyundai in your analogy, the GP-100 is actually a beefier and more sturdy revolver that wouldn't quickly depreciate relative to the Python as a result of simply the number of rounds fired.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 09:26 PM
Nope, this is not what I said at all. What I did say was that unlike the Hyundai in your analogy, the GP-100 is actually a beefier and more sturdy revolver that wouldn't quickly depreciate relative to the Python as a result of simply the number of rounds fired.

Like 918V stated I am not sure your assessment is accurate. I think that properly maintain the Python is going to last longer than you and I will which honestly is all I can ask for. :p It is a lot like other hi-performance things. You are right about the Ruger. It depreciated just like the Hyundai very quickly as soon as you took it off the showroom floor. The Colt like the Lexus will hold its value. I have owned Colt 1911s that I shot a few thousands round through and then sold for what I paid for them NIB. There is no Ruger on the market you can do the same thing with.

Going back to cars. I own a 1998 Audi A8 which is as nice today as anything Hyundai is making. I also own a 1990 Mercedes 560SEC that is even nicer IMHO than the Audi. They require a lot of expensive maintenance but if I do my part they will both run to well over 200,000 miles. :)

1858
May 10, 2011, 09:30 PM
Like 918V stated I am not sure your assessment is accurate. I think that properly maintain the Python is going to last longer than you and I will.

I'll get back to you on this ... I have a Python that I bought new in '92 and I have two GP100s ... none of them are for sale! :D

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 09:32 PM
I'll get back to you on this ... I have a Python that I bought new in '92 and I have two GP100s ... none of them are for sale!

Keep shooting and keep us informed!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :evil:

Dobe
May 10, 2011, 09:32 PM
I think that many are excited about the SR1911, because Ruger has a reputation for solid well built handguns that are reliable. The basic design of a 1911 is reliable, but not every manufacturer makes a reliable 1911.

I have ordered one, and I believe it will be a well made 1911. I base this upon Ruger's reputation with the vast majority of their products. My 1911 collection will increase by one taking the total up to eleven. They range from Norinco to Ed Brown.

When it does come in, I'll hit the range with no less than 200-300 rounds, and will have a great time.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 09:36 PM
I think that many are excited about the SR1911, because Ruger has a reputation for solid well built handguns that are reliable. The basic design of a 1911 is reliable, but not every manufacturer makes a reliable 1911.

I think that this will hold true. I do not expect the Ruger to be a Dog but I do not expect it to be a top of the line gun either. Ruger made its bones on solid work horse guns which are not always pretty. :) I think you understand what it is. It is not a Nork it is not an Ed Brown. It is somewhere in between and will meet the needs of big market segment who are not ready to pay top dollar but want a solid gun. That is the mentality I think of when I think Ruger.

At least with the SR1911 they started with an elegant design. I think they will sell well even if I don't buy one..... :D

To anyone who has one... What is the real world trigger pull weight?

ohwell
May 10, 2011, 09:37 PM
:rolleyes:brag brag brag this is about the Ruger sr1911 not some foolish way to say my stuff cost more than yours and looky looky what I got

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 09:43 PM
brag brag brag this is about the Ruger sr1911 not some foolish way to say my stuff cost more than yours and looky looky what I got

Sorry trying to use analogies because you cannot seem to understand that the RUGER is what it is. Your ego is so wrapped up in the gun you bought you are unable to look at it objectively. Everyone else in this thread seems to be able to see it for what it is.

You did not answer the question. How many 1911s do you own... ? How does it compare to the rest of the collection?

ohwell
May 10, 2011, 09:50 PM
The Ruger is my second 1911 I am more a fan of modern handguns but I do like it. I do know what the Ruger is because I actually have one . How many rounds do you have through yours? ahh you dont have one but your an expert. I believe you said in another thread you know just enough about 1911's to be dangerous. That in my humble opinion is the most honest thing you have ever said.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 09:58 PM
The Ruger is my second 1911 I am more a fan of modern handguns but I do like it. I do know what the Ruger is because I actually have one . How many rounds do you have through yours? ahh you dont have one but your an expert. I believe you said in another thread you know just enough about 1911's to be dangerous. That in my humble opinion is the most honest thing you have ever said.

I would bet I have more than 100 rounds through my 1911s. I have not shot a Ruger. I have seen one but did not break it down because I did not own it. It looked like Ruger.... which is not necessarily a bad thing.

I know enough about how to put build & repair 1911's to be dangerous. Context.... brother context.

Please show me where I said the Ruger 1911 is not going to be a good seller or a good gun. All I have said is that it is what it is. It is a US made forged/cast/mim 1911. I have not read a review yet that listed enough rounds to consider it reliable, not that it is not going to be reliable.

Again you seem like you are really emotional attached to the Ruger brand.

To the OP. The pics look good. Keep us updated.

ohwell
May 10, 2011, 10:03 PM
Again you seem like you are really emotional attached to the Ruger brand.

Not any more so than I am attached to my Brownings or My springfields I personally dont care for Glocks only because they dont feel right in my hand I do think they are good guns but you dont see me sneaking into all the Glock threads trying to stir things up in a snide way like a Eddie Haskel either.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 10:07 PM
Does anyone know if Ruger invested in MIM equipment?

Tomcat47
May 10, 2011, 10:22 PM
Nice Ruger 1911.....I like it and The price point does not look like it is going to be to bad either.

Let's just say I have more faith in Ruger to get it right than I do in Taurus and Kimber. Ruger was the one who made casting a viable option. By doing it right.

I would have to say that I would not misplace my faith in mechanical devices! I trust Rugers, Taurus, I have not yet Aquired a Kimber just yet, but I will! I want an Eclipse actually!

Now I Just purchased a Taurus PT1911...all Total was $624 with shipping! A MIM part did fail on the firearm at round 16...The Slide Stop! It really did not anger me....a little disappointment...then I realized it was MIM...Gun was not inoperable! continued myn range time and was very happy! Functioned perfect.

Emailed Taurus They sent a replacement and I also ordered some aftermarket items that were perfect fit with no fitting time needed.

The point is I could have spent $1100 for a Kimber, A Colt, Etc etc.

Manufacturers have to cut cost and this is trying times for us all to stretch a dollar, it is how that manufacturer handles the learning curve that will or will not impress me, and I for one will rely on actual experience rather than here say.

Taurus handled the problem (for me) very satisfactory! very fast! and with apology!

I think Ruger will have great results with this 1911 and if I had seen one may have bought it over a Taurus? Looks like they are going to come in around $700.00 and that will be a good thing.

Again Very Nice Ruger! And its nice to see Made In The USA on something! ( I know Im a Taurus Fan!!! But I also am a Colt Fan, Browning Fan, etc. etc. Its nice to see it on the gun)

Anger
May 10, 2011, 10:24 PM
Thanks op. Like many other posters here, The sr1911 will also be my first 1911 just as soon as I get some free cash.

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 10:35 PM
I think Ruger will have great results with this 1911 and if I had seen one may have bought it over a Taurus? Looks like they are going to come in around $700.00 and that will be a good thing.

I think their projected sweet spot is $600. I think that is what they will settle to and should sell well.

Tomcat47
May 10, 2011, 10:39 PM
thanks relascout.... I was just looking on gunbroker and they were kinda here and there $650-$725...bidding wars for the NEW toy has begun...lol

Its a Ruger it is bound to do well! :)

rellascout
May 10, 2011, 10:44 PM
thanks relascout.... I was just looking on gunbroker and they were kinda here and there $650-$725...bidding wars for the NEW toy has begun...lol

Early adopters pay a premium.

M&PVolk
May 10, 2011, 11:12 PM
You know rellascout, not everyone thinks Lexus, Audi or Mercedes are the best things going. You might reconsider the car analogies. Also, strong opinions on materials, brands, and features are a positive thing, but gun snobbery isn't quite so nice. Not everyone wants or needs a $2,000 1911 when a lower priced alternative will meet their needs just as well.

I like the idea of the new Ruger. A reasonably priced 1911 that is American made and demonstrates a level of quality not found in other guns in its price range is a win for all gun owners. Who knows, maybe it will even help open up that market to a little bit of real competition. That is a good thing for everyone.

I don't know if the Ruger will be a good gun or not, but it does come from a company that knows how to build serious firearms, and probably the most durable firearms in their respective categories. Ruger will back this gun up with outstanding customer service as well. This gun could be a major draw for a lot of people.

Now, if only they made a bobbed version....

Redlegvzv
May 10, 2011, 11:32 PM
When I see a beautiful firearm like that, made by my favorite firearm company, and then realize that it is not available for purchase in California -- well, it really makes me wonder about this screwed-up state....:banghead:

Black Butte
May 10, 2011, 11:52 PM
You are right about the Ruger. It depreciated just like the Hyundai very quickly as soon as you took it off the showroom floor.

I never said this either. Rather than trying to put the words in my mouth that fit your assumptions, you may want to reread my posts.

Ben86
May 11, 2011, 09:52 AM
I think their projected sweet spot is $600. I think that is what they will settle to and should sell well.

That's what I was thinking, once the initial fervor dies down a bit. It looks like a really good gun for the price, like most Rugers. ;)

Husker_Fan
May 11, 2011, 09:57 AM
I don't remember exactly what the requirements are for a new gun to be legal in CA. I guess it would need a physical loaded chamber indicator, mag disconnect, series 80 drop safety and maybe a lot of other things. Unfortunately, all of that on a 1911 would make a gun no one in the other states would buy.

Husker_Fan
May 11, 2011, 09:59 AM
That's what I was thinking, once the initial fervor dies down a bit. It looks like a really good gun for the price, like most Rugers.

Impactguns has them listed at 629.99. Granted, that is a wait list.

Skylerbone
May 11, 2011, 10:21 AM
Just got drenched by the testosterone trying to wade through this post! High Road. High Road. Here's my take. I'm an opinionated guy. I bought the new S&W 1911 E Series and while it's a solid performer I know there are things I don't care for. I knew them going in to the purchase and calculated what it would cost me ahead of time thanks to a bit of research. What I get out of the deal is a pistol that I can believe in for my intended purpose. Just as my Jeep goes hunting with me and my sedan takes the family out to dinner. As rella aptly said "It is what it is." (mate the tool with your purpose and understand that's all it is, even if it makes you grin.)

As for the Ruger, I may at some point buy one though cast has never been my thing. Before you call me a gun snob remember I can get a beautifully fit and well functioning PI 1911 for hundreds less than a Ruger but I do tend to buy domestic vs. foreign when given the option.

Hats off to the OP for the great review and pics. Let us know how the range time goes as well. If you're taking requests for pics how about a few of the sights, inside the dust cover, rear of slide close up (to see fit) and one of the bowtie, if so dressed.

Hoth206
May 11, 2011, 11:47 AM
I've seen folks do some pretty nice polishing work with Ruger's revolvers, I'm wondering if this wouldn't be a good candidate for some of that type of experimentation on a 1911. Looks to be about the least expensive stainless 1911 around.

Smaug
May 11, 2011, 12:25 PM
Earlier, a couple of you said "Ruger 100% over Para"

Based on what? Actual experience with Para or just a popularity contest?

Honestly, I would've gone that way too if this particular 1911 were out at the time I bought the Para. but just based on Ruger's longer history and reputation.

Now that I have the Para, there is really nothing to complain about. Well, it doesnt seem to like flat point bullets, i should admit that. I'm not sure I would continue to have the pro-Ruger bias any more. Para specializes in 1911s, even if they're not as popular overall as Rugers.

I'm taking the Para GI Expert this evening for my first action shooting session; we'll see how it performs.



"Well begun is half done."
-Aristotle

Dobe
May 11, 2011, 12:28 PM
I think their projected sweet spot is $600. I think that is what they will settle to and should sell well.

That's what I was thinking, once the initial fervor dies down a bit. It looks like a really good gun for the price, like most Rugers.
I believe the DW's were offered low at first, and once the interest was there, they raised the prices.

Ben86
May 11, 2011, 12:45 PM
I believe the DW's were offered low at first, and once the interest was there, they raised the prices.

That could happen too, but it seems with Rugers the guns are a little bit higher at first while the demand is really high, then the price drops a bit as demand levels off.

rellascout
May 11, 2011, 12:45 PM
DW changed a lot of the specs on their guns. They went to forged frames from cast and that accounted for a lot of the price increase. IIRC. I personally liked it better when the CBOB was a sub $900 gun. It is more 1911 than 99% of shooters will ever need. It was 90% of the Ed brown at a 3rd of the price.

I stated: "Ruger 100% over Para"

Para has one of the worst QC records in the 1911 industry over the last 10 years. They have gotten better since they moved production to the US. IIRC they are now made in NC outside Charlottle. The Canadian production was spotty. I personally have seen but not owned quiet a few problem Paras. Due to this first hand experience they are on my no buy list.

Dobe
May 11, 2011, 12:54 PM
Ruger had offered the Security Six at a break-even loss. So, we'll see where the price goes from here. Hopefully, it will remain stable.

At the risk of upsetting some, Taurus isn't far behind. You either get a great one, or it goes back and forth for repairs.

rellascout
May 11, 2011, 01:05 PM
At the risk of upsetting some, Taurus isn't far behind. You either get a great one, or it goes back and forth for repairs.

I would tend to agree with you about Taurus too. I have heard that Para's US CS is better than Taurus but then again almost any CS is better than Taurus.

That is the issue I have with Para. Some of them are great and run well but if you get a lemon you get a real lemon and no one wants to be stuck making lemonade. LOL

Ben86
May 11, 2011, 01:10 PM
I have heard that Para's US CS is better than Taurus but then again almost any CS is better than Taurus.

While I can't comment on how well they help customers in need I can say that the CS reps sound so condescending on the phone every time I call to ask a question. I don't appreciate that.

1911Tuner
May 11, 2011, 04:04 PM
Wow. I decided to look this one over a little late...but it seems that emotions are running high.

I haven't seen one of the Rugers yet, but I hope to very soon. As far as how well they did with their clone...we'll have to wait and see. As the guns become more common, the reports will start to filter in.

I wasn't aware that Ruger decided to make the plunger tube integral with the frame. This is a mistake, and I can't figure why a room fulla sharp engineers didn't see that.

The tube is a small, thin, relatively fragile part that is exposed and easily damaged should the pistol be dropped. With the original design, a cheap part can be replaced in 5 minutes. With their version...the whole frame is kaput, and will need to have the integral tube milled off and drilled for a standard part. A 20-dollar fix turns into a 200-dollar fix. Dumb move, methinks...and it's reason enough for me not to buy one. Not that I would anyway. I've got quite enough 1911s, thank you.

Nakanokalronin
May 11, 2011, 04:27 PM
I really don't see many people dropping guns when at the range or class. Its good for someone new to 1911s plus it cuts out a step in the manufacturing process. No need to re-stake when it eventually comes loose.

All of my other 1911s have staked on plunger tubes and I've run them hard and never dropped them or had the plunger tube crush in any manner. A crushed plunger tube happens mostly when staking them with an improper tool.

Even if someone is not interested in the SR1911, I would suggest at least checking one out at a LGS to judge it by the feel and fit of the parts. Its surprisingly tight and well finished for the price most places are asking.

ohwell
May 11, 2011, 04:40 PM
Looking at the tube on mine Tuner it does seem to be a little less fragile looking than the one on my Springer and its pretty well protected by the grip, thumb safety and slide stop seems it wood be hard to hit it by dropping it.

Dobe
May 11, 2011, 04:52 PM
I don't see it an issue either. The tube is pretty well protected from dings.

I've dropped many of mine over the years, and have yet to damage a plunger. Although, I do bow to your expertise and experience.

1911Tuner
May 11, 2011, 04:57 PM
Quote:

> No need to re-stake when it eventually comes loose. <

If the frame holes are correctly chamfered, and the tube properly staked to begin with...there will rarely be a need for restaking one. I guess that's too difficult a process for present-day manufacturers since I haven't seen one that's properly done in a good many years. Same goes for the grip screw bushings.

I have seen plunger tubes damaged from dropping. I've also seen more than a few recently manufactured tubes crack at the rear of the tube from the side-load imposed by the thumb safety, and allow the plunger to wobble to and fro.

I guess I'm just lookin' at it from a mechanic's standpoint. They're the ones who have to fix'em when they break. Way yonder faster and easier to replace the tube than have to do expensive and labor intensive work on the frame in order to repair what should be a 10-minute problem.

Nakanokalronin
May 11, 2011, 05:17 PM
I guess that's too difficult a process for present-day manufacturers since I haven't seen one that's properly done in a good many years. Same goes for the grip screw bushings.

I agree which is why I like that its part of the frame. Every 1911 I've bought gets torn down, cleaned, relubed and gets the plunger tube staked correctly with the proper tool before reassembly. For the grip bushing I usually just use some blue loctite which has worked on every 1911 I've owned so far since most manufactures don't bother staking them in.

1911Tuner
May 11, 2011, 05:25 PM
Quote:

> Every 1911 I've bought gets torn down, cleaned, relubed and gets the plunger tube staked correctly with the proper tool before reassembly.<

Well...There's more to it than just using the right tool. All of them are staked using essentially the same tool. It requires using a carbide burr to chamfer the holes to give the legs somewhere to spread out into...like a rivet. The same principle applies to the front sight tenon. Properly done, it should last the life of the gun.

Lateck
May 11, 2011, 06:56 PM
Nakanokalronin;
Thanks for the photo's. Neet.
I'm a 1911 newbie and I like mine! (SR1911)


Lateck,

rellascout
May 11, 2011, 06:57 PM
Lateck,

How does it shoot?

Racinbob
May 11, 2011, 07:57 PM
Dang Tuner! The plunger tube was something I liked. Now ya got me thinking and it hurts. Someday I'll learn.

Remllez
May 11, 2011, 09:49 PM
I dunno,the plunger tube being integral seems like a nit pick to me. It seems very well protected and I would worry about the sights breaking or stocks cracking if dropped before the plunger tube. I can count on one hand the number of times ive dropped any firearm in over 45 or so years of shooting.

To make a statement that the plunger design is a mistake is very prejudicial and judgmental. I've read about this pistol considerably and this is the first time I've heard that statement made.

Like others have said the proof will be in the pudding. The price of these new Ruger 1911's and the quality of Ruger firearms in general leads me to believe that the room fulla engineers did a darn nice job

Nakanokalronin
May 11, 2011, 10:49 PM
All of them are staked using essentially the same tool.

Not according to the variety of 1911s I own and have re-staked. Most of them actually spread out more like a rivet cone shape. Factory wise, they seem to only slightly spread the rear of the posts enough to keep the plunger on.

1911Tuner
May 11, 2011, 11:24 PM
Quote:

>To make a statement that the plunger design is a mistake is very prejudicial and judgmental. <

How is it predjudicial and judgemental to call attention to the fact that if the plunger tube is damaged and can't function that it's going to be a harder, more expensive fix than simply replacing the tube.

It doesn't require dropping the pistol to damage the tube. The walls are pretty thin. Every time the safety is manipulated, it imposes a sideload on the end of the plunger and the tube. Add MIM to the equation, and cracking or splitting becomes a greater possibility than with machined steel.

Quote 2:

>>Not according to the variety of 1911s I own and have re-staked. Most of them actually spread out more like a rivet cone shape. Factory wise, they seem to only slightly spread the rear of the posts enough to keep the plunger on.<<

The various tools used essentially do the same thing. A tapered pin is forced into the hollow end of the leg to spread it out. The difference lies in the frame prep. If the chamfer is insufficient to allow the leg to spread out enough to solidly anchor the tube...it won't last. If the frame is correctly prepped and the staking technique is properly executed...it will.

CZ57
May 11, 2011, 11:41 PM
Ruger must have considered the plungers durability and possible damage to it when they decided to cast it as part of the frame. With the reputation of their customer service at risk they would have to replace an entire frame if the plunger tube became damaged. Evidently the engineers felt that it would be a high mileage part of the frame with little worry about replacing frames.;)

1858
May 11, 2011, 11:56 PM
Ruger must have considered the plungers durability and possible damage to it when they decided to cast it as part of the frame. With the reputation of their customer service at risk they would have to replace an entire frame if the plunger tube became damaged. Evidently the engineers felt that it would be a high mileage part of the frame with little worry about replacing frames.

If you damage the plunger tube, why would Ruger be responsible for fixing it?

CZ57
May 12, 2011, 12:04 AM
They wouldn't if it were dropped or whatever but plunger tubes have fallen off the frame after extended round counts or from a high number of +P rounds fired.;)

918v
May 12, 2011, 12:32 AM
I have never herd of anyone wearing out a plunger tube on a 1911. And even if they did on this Ruger, the repair would be relatively simple.

wristtwister
May 12, 2011, 01:26 AM
I'd like to argue about the SR1911, but like the LC-9 and most of the other guns that showed up at the shot show, they're non-existant in the real world. The gun manufacturers are six to nine months ahead of their production with their advertising, and the phone rings off the hook at the gun store where I work every time one of these "new models" comes out on the cover of the latest magazine. Of course, we don't have any in stock, so all we get are pissed off customers who are hot to have one...

I had the same experience with Remington when their new 1911 "came out"... they claimed they were "readily available", but our distributor offered to cut them a check for 500 of them and got no results... I even emailed the Remington reps their phone number.

I have friends who run a rifle barrel company, so I have some insight into how things get done in the gun industry... and while I'd probably line up to be a customer for an SR1911, I certainly don't have any illusions about how available they will be any time soon. Evidently, Ruger and every other gun manufacturer is having trouble getting things to market in a workable fashion, and while the demand is tremendous for all the new gun products, the manufacturers are letting us down. Ruger isn't pumping out SR-9's, SR-40's, LC-9's, LCP's, or anything else in quantities that are improving our operations, and neither are the other manufacturers.

I keep a laundry list of purchases for particular guns that are "expected in" at any time, and many of them are backordered for months. We're making our money off older models now, and focusing on getting high-quality older guns that ARE readily available.

Like I said at the beginning... I'd like to argue about the quality of these guns, but since we don't seem to be getting them in the real world... it makes it a bit hard to do. Let's have this conversation after NEXT year's shot show... when their production has possibly caught up with their promises...

WT

Nakanokalronin
May 12, 2011, 02:08 AM
and the staking technique is properly executed

This is what I'm not seeing done from various manufactures because once I re-stake it looks proper.

1911Tuner
May 12, 2011, 05:15 AM
Quote:

>but plunger tubes have fallen off the frame after extended round counts or from a high number of +P rounds fired<

Uhhhh...No. That's not what loosens'em up.

Quote:

>I have never herd of anyone wearing out a plunger tube on a 1911. And even if they did on this Ruger, the repair would be relatively simple.<

Nor have I...but if the tube is integral with the frame, it wouldn't be a quick/easy fix.

Quote 3:

>This is what I'm not seeing done from various manufactures because once I re-stake it looks proper.<

And there ya have it. Nobody wants to take the time to do the job right any more, but there's always time for somebody else to do it over. It's the world we live in. I guess that's what happens when you hire armorers and assemblers who were baggin' groceries at the local Piggly Wiggly 2-3 weeks earlier.

I guess it's a non-issue for some. Me...I look at potential problems and try to figure ways to make'em not happen if possible...and easy to correct if they do. I don't understand why nobody ever thought to use grip bushings with left hand threads.

Onward...

Ben86
May 12, 2011, 10:19 AM
The gun manufacturers are six to nine months ahead of their production with their advertising, and the phone rings off the hook at the gun store where I work every time one of these "new models" comes out on the cover of the latest magazine. Of course, we don't have any in stock, so all we get are pissed off customers who are hot to have one...

Sounds like a successful advertisement campaign. They let the demand reach a fever pitch before they start to crank out the guns in appreciable numbers. I know it's annoying, but they are peddlers first and manufacturers second.

Hoth206
May 12, 2011, 10:31 AM
I've got to say though, that Ruger's better than some at having a new product availible in the supply pipeline. They're not perfect, but I bought an LCP about a month after it was introduced by simply calling the LGS and telling them to put me on the list.

But, I'm not sure why it's such a big deal to have the gun NOW. It's not like most of us don't have other pistols to play with until 2-3 months from now when you can walk into most gunshops.

Husker_Fan
May 12, 2011, 10:57 AM
I don't think Ruger has over hyped it. They had the gun writers to Gunsite in December to shoot the gun and tour the facility but they kept a lid on it through SHOT. It sounds like the first ones are getting distributed within weeks of the actual announcement.

Dobe
May 12, 2011, 10:59 AM
But, I'm not sure why it's such a big deal to have the gun NOW. It's not like most of us don't have other pistols to play with until 2-3 months from now when you can walk into most gunshopsBecause, we want it NOW. That's all the reason we need.

easyrider6042004@yahoo.ca
May 12, 2011, 04:36 PM
The SR1911 is so pretty and got more desirable features than a $700 dollar pistol should have.

It has everything I need in a 1911 and nothing I don't.

I hope Ruger does not raise their price when they realize they have a winner.

Lateck
May 12, 2011, 08:38 PM
How does it shoot?
rellascout;
I have only ran 50 rounds through it. I'm new to the 1911 but this feels good and I was able to place the shots where I aimed!
I'm going to compare my SIG P220 to my SR1911 tomorrow!

Lateck,

RugerNut9
May 12, 2011, 08:50 PM
/drool haha i want one, but the guys down here in VA classic say they cant get em due to a recall??

Dobe
May 12, 2011, 09:02 PM
recall?

huduguru
May 12, 2011, 10:55 PM
Just buy a Colt for $150 more...

helitack32f1
May 13, 2011, 12:47 AM
Just buy a Colt for $150 more...
no.

Nakanokalronin
May 13, 2011, 01:06 AM
/drool haha i want one, but the guys down here in VA classic say they cant get em due to a recall??

BS....They're just failing to be funny because of the recalls from other Ruger models like the SR9 and LCP. A 1911 is pretty hard to screw up and I see nothing wrong with my example what-so-ever.

Just buy a Colt for $150 more...

I already have a few. ;)

918v
May 14, 2011, 12:46 AM
Nor have I...but if the tube is integral with the frame, it wouldn't be a quick/easy fix.



Mill the plunger tube off... drill two holes...

Nakanokalronin
May 14, 2011, 01:14 AM
Well I ran 150rds through it. Ammo used was Federal maroon colored box 230gr ball and Winchester PDX-1. I had 4 failures to go into battery. I used a very wide variety of mags and 2 of the hangups where with the ball ammo and Metalform 7rd "G.I." type mags with the dimple follower. One of the hangups was with the PDX-1 plus a Wilson Combat Elite mag and the other was a PDX-1 with a Chip McCormick clone.

The failures happened about 75rds into shooting so I'm not sure if was the dirtier than normal ammo or if its still needs to be broken in more. I've shot that ammo in many other guns and never have I seen it as sooty so its kinda up in the air.

Total types of mags used
Wilson Combat Elite
Wilson Combat 47D
Metalform
Act
Chip McCormick
Chip McCormick clones
Colt
Springfield Armory
Kimpro Tac
Kimber factory
The factory Ruger mags which I believe to be Checkmates


Accuracy was right on with many of my other 1911s giving me 2.5" group at 15 yards. For some reason it got really dirty. So dirty that the barrel bushing was completely black like it was painted. I know the end gets dirty but its never been as bad on my other stainless 1911s.

All in all I'm pretty satisfied with it. I'm going to try and bring some cleaner ammo with me next time to see how it performs and hopefully the hangups are gone.

First4Freedom
May 14, 2011, 01:37 AM
Thanks for sharing the awesome pics, oh Lord I crave 1911's bad!

RON in PA
May 14, 2011, 04:50 AM
Friday night I decided to pay my favorite firearms emporium a visit as it's been a few months. Lo and behold he had a Ruger 1911. Looked it over, no obvious cosmetic flaws (also looked at a Remington R1, Remington needs to get its QC better, casting marks on the frame and that's the second one I've seen like that). Dry fired the Ruger, maybe 4.5 lbs. with a little creep that should disappear with shooting. Put some money down to hold it, total price out-the-door with fees and tax will be $650. When I pick it up I will report, but it will be a few weeks.

As for Tuner's concern about the plunger tube, it might make sense if the tube was very thin, but my impression is that it is thicker than a conventional tube.

Double Vision
May 14, 2011, 07:35 AM
Nice Ruger! Can't wait to add one to the collection.

SwampWolf
May 16, 2011, 07:54 PM
Quote:
Nor have I...but if the tube is integral with the frame, it wouldn't be a quick/easy fix.


Mill the plunger tube off... drill two holes...

Exactly! I think the integral plunger tube is a plus and, as 918v noted, in the event of failure, the fix doesn't require the wringing of hands. And I have had conventional plunger tubes (two occasions) that have come loose and the fix (restaking) didn't come cheaply.

1911Tuner
May 17, 2011, 05:41 AM
Quote:

>I have had conventional plunger tubes (two occasions) that have come loose and the fix (restaking) didn't come cheaply.<

You got ripped. Back in the day, when I was OTJ...I'd restake existing plunger tubes por nada as a courtesy...and for PR. Word of mouth brought a lot of business to the shop.

Dobe
May 17, 2011, 12:45 PM
1911Tuner,
Have you looked at the magazines, which come with the SR1911. I was wondering, if those are the same type magazines you recommend? I noticed the dimples on the followers, and thought maybe those are the same.
http://i1178.photobucket.com/albums/x367/dobe10/DSC00037.jpg
http://i1178.photobucket.com/albums/x367/dobe10/DSC00036.jpg

Skylerbone
May 17, 2011, 01:15 PM
So for the price of a new plunger tube and a mill...or a trip to the smith to have it milled off and replaced...does no one see Tuner's point that it IS a point to consider? What if it came with integral sights? Would that be a "plus" in anyone's book as they would never come loose or change point of impact?

I for one value the opinions of well informed members sharing any and all precautions with a novice like me. If I only wanted to post my opinion I would get a Facebook account.

Dobe
May 17, 2011, 02:01 PM
I think the point is made. It is still a good buy. I have other 1911s, all but one, the SR1911, have separate plunger tubes. While the separate plunger tube does offer ease of replacement, the cast frame offers lower cost, thus better affordability by the public.

If it breaks, you just haft-ta get 'er fixed.

SwampWolf
May 17, 2011, 05:26 PM
...does no one see Tuner's point that it IS a point to consider?

I don't think anybody is ignoring Tuner's point. It's just that there are other valid points to consider and one of them is that, although an integral plunger tube will likely be more expensive to repair in the rare event that it becomes damaged, the conventional method of attaching plunger tubes to 1911s lends itself to a less rare loosening event.

I for one value the opinions of well informed members sharing any and all precautions with a novice like me. If I only wanted to post my opinion I would get a Facebook account.

I'm not sure what you mean by this. :confused: I would certainly value your opinion as I do most others. I see the forum as a potential learning experience, not just a place where self-appointed gurus come to strut their stuff, and even rank novices can offer interesting, if not important, inputs and information based on their life experiences.

I frequent The High Road because people like Tuner and a host of other members have a level of expertise that can be relied on to be factual and more than mere speculation. However, it's my opinion that those members who seldom deign to ask questions but are always quick to offer their expert advice to a question asked by others, never really take full advantage of all that a good firearm website can offer. It's as if they believe that the act of questioning betrays a lack of knowledge. And that just seems sad to me.

Skylerbone
May 17, 2011, 06:40 PM
My post was about the cavalier attitude some displayed about a fact. I was not astute enough to notice the plunger tube. Were it to break it would be a very big deal to me. While I do occasionally work on my own firearms I value having a good smith in my area but try to economize whenever possible.

I did not intend to claim that Tuner's opinion was the only valuable one posted, merely that someone claiming it was no big deal ought to consider that each posting is not personally directed at them. Some are meant for me as I don't always understand the ramifications of what I tinker with.

Dobe
May 19, 2011, 08:01 AM
Weekend coming up, and that means another chance to put a few rounds through my SR1911.

SwampWolf
May 19, 2011, 03:30 PM
Hey, Dobe, keep us apprised of your range time and experience with the new Ruger.

ohwell
May 19, 2011, 04:02 PM
I put 100 more rounds through my SR1911 yesterday. No malfunctions of any kind yet. 1/2 ball and 1/2 reloads 200 grain xtp's

Marshall
May 19, 2011, 04:32 PM
Nice looking Ruger!

Congrats on your purchase and thanks for the pics!

Hammerdown77
May 19, 2011, 04:54 PM
For those who would like to see an in depth tear down and measurement of all critical dimensions on the pistol, check out APG member Joe Chambers' review:

http://www.1911pro.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=335

Note that others have mentioned the chamber on these barrels needing to be finish reamed. I wonder if that is one of the root causes of several posts where guys are having issues with RTB using both factory hardball and handloads.

aminyard
May 20, 2011, 10:59 AM
I ordered the Remington R1, but only because I do not like a stainless 1911:evil:

I have owned rugers in the past (and I still have a Ruger Standard 22) and they have always performed very well, but my 1911s need to be black:)

WardenWolf
May 20, 2011, 11:06 AM
This makes me wish I hadn't bought my Rock Island 1911 a few months ago. This thing is beautiful, and all American-made.

Dobe
May 20, 2011, 03:02 PM
Hey, Dobe, keep us apprised of your range time and experience with the new Ruger.
After this weekend, it will have been 750 rounds, and without a cleaning it.

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