Sig Sauer P226 Decocker


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DallasCop2566
May 11, 2011, 04:21 AM
The Dallas Police Department Firearms Training Center restricts weapons allowed even for Retirees qualifying under the Federal Law (Honorably Retired Law Enforcement Officer) and not owning an APPROVED weapon borrowed my former partner's service weapon, a Sig Sauer P226. He added over sized grips and even with my large hands, the decocker on this weapon was almost impossible to activate using the required one hand.

Since then I purchased an identical weapon with out the addition of the over sized grips and still find the decocker to be extremely difficult to activate using one hand.

Anybody aware of an extended decocker available for this pistol? I now see why the majority of female officers prefer a Glock without a decocker. With smaller hands, I believe using one hand to decock a P226 would be virtually
impossible.

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thump_rrr
May 11, 2011, 06:16 AM
Delete

TGReaper
May 11, 2011, 10:43 AM
Have you looked at the E2 grip on the 226 I would think it makes a noticable difference.
I do not have large hands and I have no problem with decocking my P226 E2 one handed .
TGR

Lonestar49
May 11, 2011, 12:09 PM
...

Strange, other than IF you're a left hand shooter, then I could see the problem but having a bit larger than normal long fingers, myself, I find it very easy with a 2-hand grip to simply semi release/relax the/my support hand grip just enough to bring my support hand thumb back and then up and over the decocker lever and activate it without loss of POA..

IF allowed, by your peers, one handed decocking with shooting hand is also just a semi relaxed grip and use of thumb without losing POA..

I'm just not seeing the_problem with standard Sig frame mounted decockers usage with either a 2 hand grip or one hand grip without loss of POA or, really, a good grip.

But then, I have to admit I don't have big paws.., long fingers yes


Ls

joelh
May 11, 2011, 12:15 PM
I soot a p226 left handed, so I have to use my shooting hand. I find that using my trigger finger is not a bad reach. It does take a bit of practice.

rellascout
May 11, 2011, 01:10 PM
I find it very easy with a 2-hand grip to simply semi release/relax the/my support hand grip just enough to bring my support hand thumb back and then up and over the decocker lever and activate it without loss of POA..

IF allowed, by your peers, one handed decocking with shooting hand is also just a semi relaxed grip and use of thumb without losing POA..


I practice and use both of these methods. One of the two should work unless you are left handed. Are we missing something?

9mmepiphany
May 11, 2011, 02:15 PM
I'm not sure I understand either. I don't have large hands and I don't have a problem reaching the de-cocker. Here is a picture of where my thumb sits in relation to the de-cocker...this is a 220 and it is a bit deeper (front to rear), but thinner than the 226

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n79/9mmepiphany/9-stronghandgrip.jpg

During in-service trainning, we would de-cock when moving between positions (I'm not advocating this, just saying that was the instructional requirement) and I just reached forward with my shooting thumb to depress the de-cocker. If you don't want to go all the way to the E2 grip...I don't like the way it forces your grip lower on the backstrap...you could look into the Hogue Aluminum or G-10 grips (they are a bit flatter on the sides)

DallasCop2566
May 11, 2011, 02:23 PM
I guess the majority of the problem is just OLD stiff and achy fingers and a little Gout thrown in. With a two hand hold, no problem, but using just one hand it is difficult, but I have kept trying and have gotten better at it.

Practice makes it easier, so I will just keep practicing. Love the weapon. Bought a Glock 17 and my partner who is still on the job went ballistic. He is a stead fast Sig Sauer guy, went to their armorers training.

To keep him quiet, I then bought the Sig Sauer and gave the Glock to my son. he is thrilled, I am happy and above all my partner is happy and can repair any problem that arises, which he says won't, "It is a Sig Sauer".

Thanks for the replies. This is what happens when an old revolver shooter is forced into modern times. I guess I won't be called Caveman and Fred Flintstone anymore.:)

9mmepiphany
May 11, 2011, 03:31 PM
If you are still in love with your revolvers, I can highly recommend the Sig DAK trigger system. It feel just like a well worn K-frame and there is no de-cocker to worry about.

I'll even bet your old partner can get the parts very reasonably and install them for you on your 226

DallasCop2566
May 11, 2011, 03:38 PM
The DAK Trigger system is what they are now issuing new officers. Think I will try one and maybe take your recommendation.

rcmodel
May 11, 2011, 03:39 PM
I have no problem decocking my P6 without changing my grip. It is very very easy.

My P232 is another matter.
It's almost like they made it a stretch, and stiffer, so you couldn't use the decocker with your finger still in the trigger guard.
Which would totally defeat the firing pin lock as it decocked if you held the trigger back too far.

Personally, I see that as a good thing.

rc

hAkron
May 11, 2011, 10:04 PM
I'm a lefty and my P229 decocker is a lot easier to hit than the slide release.

DallasCop2566
May 14, 2011, 03:23 AM
I guess my posting of the problem I was having decocking my new Sig Sauer P226 with one hand, a requirement in two positions of the required qualification of the Dallas Police Firearms Training Center got the attention of a female Sergeant who told me she attended some Federal Training and this was one of the requirements and a lot of females with smaller hands were having the same problem as well as some males with smaller hands.

She informed me to simply turn the weapon 90 degrees to my left, thus the decocking lever is facing down (towards the ground) and see if this simplifies the decocking procedure. The weapon remains aimed downrange, this simple movement takes less than a second and AMAZING, it works.

Even in the weak hand hold (in this case my left hand) turning the weapon 90 degrees to the right, thus the decocking lever is facing up, made it much more simple to decock.

TRY IT, YOU WILL LIKE IT;)

Thanks Sergeant Reardon, something so simple, but so effective.:)

loneviking
May 14, 2011, 03:31 AM
TRY IT, YOU WILL LIKE IT

I'm a lefty and I've been doing this with my P6 (using my index finger) for years. Glad you posted this though, as I guess it's not something a lot of folks think about. When you're left handed, you have to work at making things work with these guns designed for righties! :scrutiny:

1858
May 14, 2011, 05:22 AM
She informed me to simply turn the weapon 90 degrees to my left, thus the decocking lever is facing down (towards the ground) and see if this simplifies the decocking procedure. The weapon remains aimed downrange, this simple movement takes less than a second and AMAZING, it works.

Are you adjusting your grip on the pistol when you rotate it? If you maintain the same grip, I don't see how rotating the pistol will make any difference.

DallasCop2566
May 14, 2011, 06:30 AM
This suggested procedure was for a ONE HAND DECOCK. Decocking with a two hand grip was taught to her to utilize the index finger or thumb of her left hand being right handed.

I guess just the act of rotating the pistol 90 degrees automatically forces a grip change, but doing it rapidly it is virtually unnoticeable and as you return to the normal position, your normal grip returns, probably from habit.

I am like you, did not think this would make any difference, but after about the fifth try, increasing the speed each time, I found it worked remarkably well.

JDGray
May 14, 2011, 07:40 AM
I'll even bet your old partner can get the parts very reasonably and install them for you on your 226

Parts are over $200 for the swap, but a post on Sig Forum in the classifieds, should find you someone that wants out of the DAK system that will trade you parts:)

9mmepiphany
May 14, 2011, 03:14 PM
Are you adjusting your grip on the pistol when you rotate it? If you maintain the same grip, I don't see how rotating the pistol will make any difference.
I guess just the act of rotating the pistol 90 degrees automatically forces a grip change, but doing it rapidly it is virtually unnoticeable and as you return to the normal position, your normal grip returns, probably from habit.

I am like you, did not think this would make any difference, but after about the fifth try, increasing the speed each time, I found it worked remarkably well.
I'm glad you posted it too...I never noticed the difference, because I'm been doing that (actually rotating the other way {clockwise}) to reach my magazine release forever and didn't know that others did not. I actually had a pick up a pistol and rotate it a few times to understand the why. I listen to how my body wants to move a lot from my Tai Chi practice and don't always think about how I move except in retrospect.

The reason you have more reach is because when you turn the wrist 90 degrees, you have returned it to isn't natural position of maximum flexibility...if you just relax your wrist it will turn the gun counter-clockwise; it is also the position that you type in....this adds slack the tendons/muscles/ligaments that allow you to reach further with your thumb. You get the same effect when you rotate clockwise, in reaching for the magazine release, when you drop your elbow. The gun does shift a bit in your gun, but it returns to your Master grip as you straighten your wrist.

Forgive me for not mentioning this earlier, when you've been making certain movements for a long time, you don't even think about them any more

DallasCop2566
May 15, 2011, 03:25 AM
In early April when I qualified, I had to borrow my partner's Sig Sauer P226, as the only APPROVED weapon I had was a S&W revolver, and my old stiff fingers and speed loaders just don't do well.

After a very rapid learning session and 100 rounds later I am ready to qualify. My partner has large hands and had oversized grips and the only difficulty I had was decocking and found it virtually impossible with one hand.

The Sig Sauer P226 I now own has regular grips, but it is still difficult to decock, but the procedure the young female Sergeant informed me of solved the entire problem.

Now my only problem is the habit of trying to hold the semi-automatic as I did a revolver. Practice, practice and more practice should solve that.

Thanks for all the input folks, really appreciate the education.

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