first SR1911 problem?


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ISO1600
May 21, 2011, 02:19 AM
i searched and found nothing.
Today i picked up my (wife's) SR1911. Haven't shot it yet. Just got home from dinner, decided to strip and clean/lube it. Got all the factory grime off (either they left a lot on it, and had to have shot it more than once- or the dealer i got it from had some fun and didn't clean up afterwards)..... well after cleaning, i put a drop or two of Rem-Oil on the frame rails, and put her back together.
All was well and good until after i had racked the slide probably 5 times- it stuck. Like, HARD stuck. Had to whack the rear of the slide real freaking hard to get it to return to battery.
Concern sets in.
Strip the pistol back down, nothing looks unusual.
Clean and oil again.
Repeat.... still sticking, although very intermittently. Sometimes every "rack" in a row for as many as 10 it will get stuck, then it will be fine for 4 or 5... only to get stuck the next time.
This isn't, by definition, my FIRST 1911- i got a Metro Arms for myself a few weeks ago that is off getting warranty work right now. I think i have bad luck with these things.

BUT my question is- is some inconsistent slide/frame friction normal for a new 1911? Does it need to be shot some to wear in?

I am concerned about it, because we were planning on shooting this in our CHL class tomorrow morning. Here it is midnight and i dont have much trust in this gun to function properly tomorrow. Might have to use the LCP (ugh) or a rental haha.



any advice?
I also have a gross machine mark or some kind of imperfection on the left side of the trigger guard, just near the mag release.

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ISO1600
May 21, 2011, 02:38 AM
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_UOeOhCtXsOg/TddOpE_6NmI/AAAAAAAAGhY/cUZwbokQHx8/s640/IMG_3360.JPG

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/kczqtOaBS5dqxyTqcQVGGw?feat=directlink
Photo of the casting flaw(?) and some more photos, including the slide "locked" back on no mag and without the slide lock.
Overall, this has a worse fit and finish than the $430 American Classic i had to send back, because it unfortunately did not work haha.

blackhawk556
May 21, 2011, 05:55 AM
Oh man that sucks. That mark looks crappy, I guess that shows these aren't custom finished guns. I still want one though. I read about someone's xd locking like this and people say it ws because they didn't put the recoil spring and barrel back correctly. I hope that helps.

Sent from my SGH-i917 using Board Express

ISO1600
May 21, 2011, 08:42 AM
yeah i have read that about recoil springs- i'll take another look at it, but it is still in the factory position. haven't taken it off the plunger.

Jed Carter
May 21, 2011, 09:05 AM
It is possible to put a 1911 back together with the slide catch/takedown pin not in the barrel link.

ISO1600
May 21, 2011, 09:06 AM
looking at it again, i found rough, galled marks on both sides of the frame/slide contact areas where it has definately been making some hard contact. Lots of metal powder from the rubbing. I've racked it probably 200 times and it is feeling smoother, but the rail on the left side looks like crap now.
I'll take it to the range today and run 100-200 rounds through and report back.

WC145
May 21, 2011, 10:07 AM
Use more/better lube, maybe some light grease on the rails. In my experience 1911s run better a little on the wet side. I use M-Pro7 and don't have any problems with my guns except a Detonics, it needs a little touch of Tetra grease on the rails.

As far as the cosmetic issues go, speak to Ruger and see what they say. I'd live with that mark in the picture but that's me.

ohwell
May 21, 2011, 10:10 AM
Like Jed said better make sure the slide stop is going through the barrel link

SwampWolf
May 21, 2011, 10:29 AM
If the problem stems from "the slide stop not going through the barrel link", it would seem that the slide sticking issue would not be occurring intermittently but would be happening every time. I think the problem is either due to improper frame to slide tolerances or poor finishing on the slide rails or a combination of the two. And the slide on a 1911 pistol should not stick even if inadequately lubed.

aminyard
May 21, 2011, 05:12 PM
The fix is simple, send it back to remington and let them fix it (for free).

ISO1600
May 21, 2011, 05:25 PM
i dont think Remington would like me sending in a Ruger. :)

ISO1600
May 21, 2011, 05:26 PM
After messing with it a LOT last night and this morning, it is travelling much better. Still not as smooth as my American Classic, but we'll see if it gets better. Picked up some Tetra grease at the gun show, and am headed to the range with 250 rounds of various 230gr and 185gr. Will report back later today.

jgiehl
May 21, 2011, 05:42 PM
With my Springfield 1911 I had it was a little sticky at first and was touchy with certain ammo. So I took it out and bought a bunch of ammo and just pounded away. Wasn't doing accuracy but working the gun to smooth it up.

xr1200
May 21, 2011, 05:58 PM
Thats one of the problems with a full stainless steel 1911, if you make it to tight it usually gauls at the frame rails.

This is why a lot the manufacturers make 1911 slide to frame fit is loose.

In 1990's top custom 1911 smiths catalogs, they advised that if you wanted your gun as tight as possible, you needed to use a blued gun or if you had a stainless steel gun it needed to be hard chromed in order to minimize gauling.

One key thing I noticed about ruger stainless steel guns and identical blued models , is that the stainless steel model will be a lot soften or less hardened than the identical blued models.

If you take a ruger 77 or one of the intergeral scope ring revolver models and securely tighten the scope rings to the reciever or mount and then remove them, you will find that the metal on the stainless steel models is severly distorted by the scope rings at the base of mounts reciever.

Now do the same thing on the identical blued model, there will only be a small mark in the finish, no visible distortion of the metal.

From this observation you can easily see that ruger carbon steel models are harder than the stainless steel models.

One other point about stainless steel is that it usually can't be hardened by the normal heating process, the hardness of stainless steel is usually determined by the metals alloy content.

If you want the most accurate and tight 1911 then stick to the carbon steel models, stainless steel guns are best for duty or daily carry firearms.

Here's a good link explaining the nature of stainless steel. http://chemistry.about.com/cs/metalsandalloys/a/aa071201a.htm

918v
May 21, 2011, 07:04 PM
Thank You for saving me alot of money :)

ISO1600
May 21, 2011, 07:22 PM
Just shot 250 rds. With tetra on the slide. Runs perfect now. No complaints.

1858
May 28, 2011, 01:45 AM
xr1200,
416 stainless steel is martensitic and is commonly used for 1911 frames and slides, barrels, receivers etc. It can be tempered and hardened. Ed Brown doesn't have a problem with stainless steel 1911s and neither do I. All six of my 1911s have stainless steel frames, and five of them have stainless steel slides too. No galling, binding or other issues to report.

From Ed Brown's FAQ (http://www.edbrown.com/FAQ.htm#aax)

Q: What is the difference between stainless and blue steel [1911s]? Does stainless steel gall?

A: Stainless steel is more rust resistant, and costs a little more. There is no other significant difference between the two with regard to any attribute of a 1911 - accuracy, longevity, durability, etc. are all virtually identical between the two. We have been building all stainless guns for many years from high quality 416 stainless steel and there are no problems with galling.

918v
May 28, 2011, 01:51 AM
I owned a stainless Springer 1911... no galling. Regular oil for lube.

I owned a Sig P226 Sport Stock that was as tight as my P210. no galling either, again using regular good old Break Free gun oil.

Tight has nothing to do with it. I suspect the slide is as soft as the frame here.

1858
May 28, 2011, 01:54 AM
Tight has nothing to do with it.

I agree. A properly machined and fitted 1911 made from quality stainless steel offers better corrosion resistance while giving up nothing in terms of reliability or longevity.

ISO1600
May 30, 2011, 09:22 PM
Update, since people seem to be concerned (as noticed in another thread).

nearly 500 rounds in, and this thing is wonderful.
Here are some close-up pictures of the slide/frame rails showing any wear that you may or may not be concerned about.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5070/5778245087_149c2465b0_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5778245087/)
IMG_3501 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5778245087/) by Chris.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/people/mx5chris/), on Flickr
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5228/5778235443_9396f96c67_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5778235443/)
IMG_3497 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5778235443/) by Chris.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/people/mx5chris/), on Flickr
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2519/5778783130_490e0240ec_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5778783130/)
IMG_3499 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5778783130/) by Chris.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/people/mx5chris/), on Flickr
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5223/5778786494_9215af4ca2_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5778786494/)
IMG_3500 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5778786494/) by Chris.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/people/mx5chris/), on Flickr

If anybody would like higher resolution versions, let me know.

As for my American Classic 1911, it had an out of spec disconnector, and has been returned to me in perfect functioning order.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3121/5777721405_59ca8fb332_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5777721405/)
IMG_3493 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mx5chris/5777721405/) by Chris.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/people/mx5chris/), on Flickr

i have since installed slim G10 Hogue grips on the SR1911, and put its grips on the Metro to replace its crummy panels.

Apocalypse-Now
May 30, 2011, 11:16 PM
I agree. A properly machined and fitted 1911 made from quality stainless steel offers better corrosion resistance while giving up nothing in terms of reliability or longevity.

quite the opposite, SS is not as hard as high carbon steel. for this reason, SS 1911's generally peen and loosen much quicker than carbon steel ones.

also, if not treated properly, like s&w SS 1911's and some kimber SS barrels, they rust easier as well.


I owned a stainless Springer 1911... no galling. Regular oil for lube.

SA uses low carbon SS. plus, they treat and finish it well so they don't tend to rust. peening is not unusual for them either, although it's rarely an issue. it's unknown whether ruger does either of these. the frame is already going to be softer steel because it's cast, rather than forged (in addition to being SS).


if i were interested in getting an SR1911, i would wait for the inevitable carbon steel one :) JMO (i'm picky when it comes to 1911 purchases lol)

Walkalong
May 30, 2011, 11:33 PM
Those grips look real nice on the Ruger.

I also like the way Ruger did the rear serrations, and also like that they left them off the front.

I'm glad it is running nicely for you now. :)

1858
May 30, 2011, 11:39 PM
SS is not as hard as high carbon steel. for this reason, SS 1911's generally peen and loosen much quicker than carbon steel ones.

What high carbon steel is used for 1911 frames and slides ... the specific alloy if you'd care to enlighten us? How do you peen a slide and frame in shear? I'll stick with Ed Brown thank you very much and take a 416 stainless frame and slide over a carbon steel frame and slide every day of the week. As for corrosion, my preference is stainless steel with a coating of some form or another. As for Kimber and stainless steel barrels, which models have stainless steel barrels? Neither my Tactical Entry II or Stainless Pro Raptor II have stainless steel barrels.

Apocalypse-Now
May 30, 2011, 11:48 PM
What high carbon steel is used for 1911 frames and slides ... the specific alloy if you'd care to enlighten us? How do you peen a slide and frame in shear? I'll stick with Ed Brown thank you very much and take a 416 stainless frame and slide over a carbon steel frame and slide every day of the week. As for corrosion, my preference is stainless steel with a coating of some form or another. As for Kimber and stainless steel barrels, which models have stainless steel barrels? Neither my Tactical Entry II or Stainless Pro Raptor II have stainless steel barrels.

you know, you can disagree without sounding obnoxious, right? ;)

not sure what you're asking, some 1911's are prone to peening and some aren't. the slide/barrel locking lugs are a location where it's particularly prevalent.

...and yes, i know not all kimber has SS barrels (did you bother to read my previous post, or just the one sentence you quoted?).

here's a nice reference site to kimber SS barrels rusting that i previously mentioned, along with peening and some other issues (pics included): http://www.full-auto.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=54

feel free to ask more questions, or disagree without being curt :)

1858
May 30, 2011, 11:58 PM
not sure what you're asking, some 1911's are prone to peening and some aren't.


You stated that stainless steel 1911s are prone to peening because stainless steel isn't as hard as high carbon steel. I've asked you to tell us which carbon steel alloys are used in carbon steel slides, barrels and frames. Ed Brown uses 416 stainless steel for frames, slides and barrels so you must know which carbon steel series is used since you state that it's harder than stainless steel.

Apocalypse-Now
May 31, 2011, 12:08 AM
You stated that stainless steel 1911s are prone to peening because stainless steel isn't as hard as high carbon steel.

sure didn't ;) i said some were prone to peening.

obviously some makers use higher carbon concentrates than others to strengthen it. :)

ohwell
May 31, 2011, 12:18 AM
So than tell us what steel Ruger uses would you please and how many thousands of rounds must I shoot to see peening on my Ruger?

Apocalypse-Now
May 31, 2011, 12:30 AM
So than tell us what steel Ruger uses would you please and how many thousands of rounds must I shoot to see peening on my Ruger?

here we go again LOL *facepalm*

please point out where i claimed you will see peening on your ruger? ;)

it just came out, bro. your guess about the quality of it's steel is as good as mine :)


if you're worried about the durability of a brand new production gun, you should wait a while before purchasing one.

if you'll reread my post, i simply indicated my preference for carbon steel 1911's, as they are generally more durable. sorry if you can't handle that.



you guys should do some hanging out on 1911forum. you'll learn much form the 'smiths on there like ned christiansen and chuck rodgers ;)

ohwell
May 31, 2011, 12:40 AM
I'm not worried in the least I love the gun its holding up very well as far as I'm concerned.

Apocalypse-Now
May 31, 2011, 12:50 AM
glad to hear it :)

1858
May 31, 2011, 04:32 AM
here's a nice reference site to kimber SS barrels rusting that i previously mentioned, along with peening and some other issues (pics included)

From your link ...

"Kimber likes to use unfinished carbon steel in their barrels that looks like stainless steel barrels, but in reality isn't stainless ..."

The photos showing pitting are of steel barrels not stainless steel barrels. Very few Kimbers come with stainless steel barrels. The Gold Match and Stainless Gold Match models do, but few others. I use a Kimber TEII in USPSA matches and corrosion is a big problem here and yet the barrel and steel slide show no corrosion at all. I did fit an Ed Brown stainless steel barrel a couple of months ago which shoots better so it's there to stay. The finish is excellent and shows minimal wear despite the relatively harsh treatment typical of USPSA matches.

I didn't see anything about peening either. Mostly just one administrator using a site to forward his own anti-Kimber agenda.

Apocalypse-Now
May 31, 2011, 04:44 AM
ok. you win ;)

aprayinbear
May 31, 2011, 05:16 AM
A few thoughts from a knife maker,:rolleyes:

Neither stainless, nor carbon steel is inherently harder. The hardness is determined in the hardening process. And of course, choosing the correct hardness is a matter of compromise; too hard and the steel is brittle, to soft and the steel won't stand up to heavy use.

So my guess is that the problems you described has more to do with the way the steels are hardened.

Just my two cents:)

Skylerbone
May 31, 2011, 12:33 PM
My guess is any peening issue is an issue related to out of spec parts. As noted previously peening does not occur between the slide and frame rails.

It appears from the pics that the OP's Ruger simply had roughly finished rails. The good news is they will eventually wear in and with proper lubrication the initial problem should not resurface.

918v
May 31, 2011, 02:01 PM
My guess is any peening issue is an issue related to out of spec parts.

Yes, like hardness being out of spec.

ISO1600
May 31, 2011, 02:07 PM
Maybe i'm missing something, but where did the whole peening discussion come from? I know i didn't (intend) to start it, because i dont even fully understand what peening is, in relation to guns/frames.
I said that it appeared i had some galling on my rails, but they seem to be smoothing out now.

Dobe
May 31, 2011, 03:00 PM
If I may suggest, perhaps the galling was not galling, but smoothing of rough spots. These rough spots by the way are in no way a standard to which any reputable company should aspire.

My SR1911 has had 1050 flawless rounds, and I've never cleaned the gun once. At most, I've put a little grease on the rails, and didn't do that every time I took it to the range.

rellascout
May 31, 2011, 03:05 PM
If it were my gun I would be on the phone with Ruger. IMHO that is not acceptable. The gun was not manufacured properly. The tolerances are off. Normal movement of the slide manually or from shooting should not produce those marks. They look deep enough that they would not have been prevented by using any amount of grease.

Simply because the pistol is functioning better now does not mean this is right. I would be concerned with its long term durability.

460Kodiak
May 31, 2011, 04:06 PM
Maybe it's the knuter valve that's out of spec. :)

It could be shaming up your raily-ma-bobs. LOL

SSN Vet
May 31, 2011, 04:07 PM
Glad to see some real life info. on the new Ruger 1911s instead of the typical fan boy schtick.....

For an economy 1911, I don't think the small casting "defect" near the trigger guard is any big deal. It aint an Ed Brown or a Wilson.

The slide sticking is another issue all together imo. And though the first detailed slide pics do look like normal rubbing in ware, 3499 and 3500 look gauled to me.

As for carbon steel vs. stainless, imo. it's an apples to oranges comparison.

Stainless can be hard, but hard stainless can also be very hard (read expensive) to machine.

Stainless is prone to gauling.

Despite it's name, "stainless" steel can and does rust.

Carbon steel is probably easier to make "very hard" (i.e. Rockwell 'C' 60+) but such a metal is better suited for the edge of a chisel or for an end mill, not a 1911 slide.

Well maintained carbon steel can provide corrosion free service for years. But then again, carbon steal can show a perfect rust stain from a sweaty thumb print in hours.

Any and every design detail is always a compromise between competing factors.

Skylerbone
May 31, 2011, 04:08 PM
Rella, were it your 1911 I suspect it would have been shipped back as soon as it stuck, without ever having fired a round. That would have been my course of action.

As long as the OP remains watchful of the situation, I doubt it will develop any further problems. I would recommend flushing out any debris with a good cleaner and then relube it. If it does turn South then send it back.

rellascout
May 31, 2011, 04:19 PM
Rella, were it your 1911 I suspect it would have been shipped back as soon as it stuck, without ever having fired a round. That would have been my course of action.

As long as the OP remains watchful of the situation, I doubt it will develop any further problems. I would recommend flushing out any debris with a good cleaner and then relube it. If it does turn South then send it back.

My issue is with these pictures because it is hard to tell just how deep they are. I assume since it is a Ruger the frame is cast. Does anyone know how they are heat treating these? I am not a cast expert by any means but my concern would be wear eating into that hardening tretment.

It sort of reminds me of the galling you see on Sigs sometimes.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2519/5778783130_490e0240ec_b.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5223/5778786494_9215af4ca2_b.jpg

ohwell
May 31, 2011, 04:53 PM
Mine looks nothing like that. What did you lube it with? It almost looks like fine particles of sand or something in the upper pic.

ISO1600
May 31, 2011, 05:03 PM
at first i lubed it with RemOil, which hasn't touched it since.
I am now using a mix of Tetra Grease and fine Abilene, TX airborne sand (i kid, i kid).
The sand on the frame in that picture is just dust that settled on it in the 30 seconds i was outside to take that picture. Here in Abilene, it is often very hot, windy, and sandy.
I am now keeping the slide "wet" with Tetra Grease. Have not seen any metal shavings/residue/etc since the first outing with it.

918v
May 31, 2011, 08:55 PM
Yup. That's galling.

Maybe the reason others are not seeing galling is because their slides are properly hardened.

I hate early production items... Cars, guns, whatever.

Apocalypse-Now
May 31, 2011, 09:08 PM
maybe it's normal for ruger's cast frame :confused:

anyone else have these marks on their SR1911?

it may not be galling, but rather casting marks.....did you notice it before you fired it?


if it is an issue, everyone says ruger has great service. sure it's nothing to worry about :)

xr1200
May 31, 2011, 09:30 PM
You definity have some damage there on slide rails from galling.

As for what brown states about the differences between stainless and carbon steel guns, is that he doesn't state that stainless guns can be made as tight as a carbon steel gun.

A stainless steel 1911 will be made with slighty more tolerances, than a carbon steel gun in order to reduce the chances of galling.

With these slight differences, the avergae shooter would not notice any difference in accuracy between shooting the stainless or the blued gun to make a difference.

But put them in a machine vice with the same ammo and you will probably see a slightly tighter group from the blued gun, if they are both made to match target specs.

ISO1600
May 31, 2011, 09:59 PM
the marks were not there when i first took it apart. I wish i would have looked more carefully at the rails before messing with it.

i'm not really worried too much about it. This is my wife's pistol, it isn't a race gun or anything. If things really start to look down, i'll get with Ruger about it.

BCRider
May 31, 2011, 10:32 PM
The odds are very good that the gun will now run very nicely for a lot of years.

The marks on the slides in the two pictures that look like grains of sand stuck in the end of a scratch certainly are galling marks. The slide was obviously slightly tight and what happened is that now and then you'd pick up a "gall" and that is why the slide would stick badly. Then you'd bust it free and it would be fine but with a bit of rubbing until it would pick up some metal and gall again on a tight spot. The little balls of metal that are the "sand" at the end of the gall track acted like wedges to lock the slide.

Ideally you would have noticed that this was an issue in time and chosen to stone the high points sooner. Also an extreme pressure lube such as a good grease earlier may have avoided some of the galling. But that's all water under the bridge now. What you have is what you have. And now that it's fitted itself you're good for a long time.

If it were me I'd still run a pass or two of a very fine slip stone over the marks just to dress off any peaks from the typically work hardened balls of metal at the ends of the gall tracks. But if the gun is working well now that's just a bit of me being picky.

xr1200
May 31, 2011, 10:35 PM
Just complain to ruger and they will probably give you a new gun as its a new product launch and will want to keep bad press to a minimum.

Just tell them you did everything properly and followed the owners manual to a T and you used only factory ammo.

Don't tell me them if you messed with anything.

One thing ppl that get wrong when they think their gun is assembled at a gun factory is that the gun will be handled by either a gunsmith or machinist at every step. When it is common for a lot of manufactures to just train a factory assembler for a specific task and this one step is all that they do all day. So it is common for a part to be fit wrong or even miss a step in manufacturing.

foolsgold80z
May 31, 2011, 10:49 PM
As a machinist the first thing I notice in your photos that relates to your slide sticking issue is the upper edges of the slide groove on the frame appear to have not been deburred and appear to be sharp or to have a raised burr. The galling could have occurred from some of this burr material coming loose and being trapped between the slide and frame. I would clean up those edges and any sharp edges on the slide with a stone or small fine file. By "edges" I mean the sharp corners. Good luck with your new gun.

Smaug
May 31, 2011, 10:53 PM
Well, I don't know about you guys, but I didn't expect it to be PERFECT for a $600 1911.

xr1200
May 31, 2011, 10:57 PM
If your wondering why the galling of stainless steel or any other metal will usually occur on a moving surface once the oiled surface lubrication breaks down and you start to get hard contact between the 2 metal contact points.

The galling occurs at this contact point , where small pieces of the actual metal tend to break off and get caught in the contact point causing further damage to the metal surface from the hard metal particles that are now acting like valve grinding compound.

If ruger gives you a new gun , I would recommend taking the gun partially apart and running the slide back and forth making sure to keep everything lubricated well and clean the slide ways of any metal chips and debree etc. and relube it again and run the slide back and forth for at least 500 cycles by hand. This should prevent galling of the new gun.

CZF
June 1, 2011, 02:50 AM
I'm no 1911 expeet, but did hand cyclle my stainless CBOB some
years ago about 100 hundred times a day for a week before shooting it.

Having been told that they were very tight from the factory, I was glad to have did that as the gun ran 100% with over 200 mixed rounds.

You can bet that when I eventually buy a SR1911 I'll be doing the same thing before shooting it.

SSN Vet
June 1, 2011, 12:34 PM
I'd definately send it back to Ruger....

Just tell them the simple truth... the slide was wicked tight, so you cleaned it, lubed it and then when you shot it, it galled.

Galling is like smearing the metal at the surface and I believe it will continue to degrade.

If Ruger is any where near as good as all their fans say they are, they'll certainly make this right with no fuss. And they should pay your shipping both ways as well.

Keep us posted..... inquiring minds want to see how they respond for you.

ISO1600
June 1, 2011, 12:54 PM
Ok i sent an online support request giving them links to the pictures/info (this thread) and we'll see what they do.

rellascout
June 1, 2011, 01:19 PM
Why not call them? One of Ruger's #1 selling points is that they have good customer service. I bet one call to them will get you a call tag which you can print out yourself. Box up the pistol and send it back.

Dobe
June 1, 2011, 01:21 PM
That would be my suggestion also.

Skylerbone
June 1, 2011, 01:40 PM
xr1200, you ought not suggest people omit any part of the truth when dealing with manufacturers. In my day that was called lying, still is in my book and not very High Road. As it stands we are unaware of any careless handling by the OP and nothing about his experience seems exaggerated or misrepresented at this point. Let's not encourage bad behavior.

The Ruger is investment cast, I don't know their specific heat treatment or hardness. I do know Ruger has a sizable investment in this pistol's production and solid customer support. If the OP has any lingering doubt about shootability or durability he should not hesitate to call.

ISO1600
June 1, 2011, 02:45 PM
i really am not worried about it much at all at this point. I am hesitant to call, because i imagine they'll say "send it in and we'll look at it". Then my wife will be without her pistol while they figure it out. I've already changed the grip bushings and panels on it, so that is work/trouble potentially wasted. If their customer service is as good as everybody says, i'll just wait until it DOES give me trouble- which i dont think will be until a LONG time from now. This is not a carry or competition piece.

also, i dont see xr1200 telling me to lie or anything, i'm not sure what you (skyler) are talking about.

I'll keep you guys posted on what i hear from Ruger.

highlander 5
June 1, 2011, 03:19 PM
Years ago I had a chance to fire a Coonan 357 mag semi auto and it had the same problems that the OP had galling. the owner cleaned of all the lube on the pistol and it wouldn't function. I am not a machinist or a metalurgist,but having been around all kinds of exotic alloys used in the manufacturing of jet engines there are times that no matter how much you deburr,polish or hone you still have microscopic burrs that cause the gremlins to come out.
I'm old enough to remember when SS was first used to make a revolver S&W mod 60 if I recall and the pistols were a bear to manufacture because they hadn't fully figured out how to machine SS. And the same complaints came out then. I have read some post on 1911 slide to frame fit from KIMBER was so tight the pistol would barely function.
The OP has a right to complain about his pistol but let's remember that this is a first run
for Ruger in the 1911 dept and it may take a bit to smooth out production

xr1200
June 1, 2011, 04:03 PM
I'm not telling anyone to lie intentionally. But you have to watch out what you put in writing or saying to a customer service rep. when calling for waranty replacement work. In a lot of situations, it may be the goal for a customer service agent to deny a customers complaints for some companies.

Its like when for your car you have to have to serviced by only factory trained reps, do some simple thing yourself or change the oil, tranny fluid, muffler etc. and they will say you voided the waranty.

Look at a lot of the gun companies simply change the sights and it voids the waranty for some companies, its, just simple BS used to deny a legitimate complaint or defect.

So when ever you file a waranty claim make sure you read the written waranty very well , before you call or write to them, so you no exactly how to play their game.

Also if you get stone walled by a customer service rep. demand you talk to a supervisor or manager, often this will work and you can get the problem resolved.

mooner
June 7, 2011, 10:54 AM
Hello,

I posted this in another thread, but thought I should post it here as well for anyone with questions on the galling.

I also just purchased an SR1911 and when I took it apart to clear before shooting I noticed some small scratches on the frame similar to the galling pictures, but not to the same extent. I also notices a thin, 1/4" long metal chip inside the gun. I also had similar burrs on the slide grooves in my gun.

From all of this, I surmised the chip was a burr that had come loose and the scratches were not galling, but scratches from the harder material of the burr getting caught between the softer slide and frame. Stoned to the slide to remove the burrs.

I have since shot around 100 rounds through the gun with no malfunctions and decent - for me - accuracy. No more scratches and the small ones that were present have been worn down from the gun breaking in.

From my perspective it is not galling, but scratches from the slide not being fully de-burred. I did notify Ruger of this and hopefully they will have it all worked out.

Thanks,

Andy

rellascout
June 7, 2011, 01:34 PM
From my perspective it is not galling, but scratches from the slide not being fully de-burred. I did notify Ruger of this and hopefully they will have it all worked out.


Maybe I am missing something but to me it is still galling. It does not matter if it was a burr or something else. It sound like Ruger is not properly deburring and finishing the slide and or rails causing this to appear. I wonder how wide spread it is?

I am also confused as to why people do not see this as an issue? Is this type of wear considered acceptable in most people's opinions?

SSN Vet
June 7, 2011, 03:58 PM
i imagine they'll say "send it in and we'll look at it".

that's exactly what they're going to say....

and they should pay the round trip shipping.

918v
June 7, 2011, 04:55 PM
I am also confused as to why people do not see this as an issue? Is this type of wear considered acceptable in most people's opinions?

Some people don't give a damn about details as long as the slide cycles and the gun feeds and extracts. Most people at the range are there to make noise and to impress their friends. "Ruger, it's gotta be good." Well, it ain't necessarily so.

marb4
June 7, 2011, 05:22 PM
"i really am not worried about it much at all at this point. I am hesitant to call, because i imagine they'll say "send it in and we'll look at it". Then my wife will be without her pistol while they figure it out."


I can totally understand the hesitation in sending your firearm in for service. I recently had an issue with my Ruger GP100 and kept putting off sending it to Ruger because I hated the idea of seeing it go and hoping to maybe see it again one day. I sent it in and had it back in my safe in 7 days (shipping time included). Granted I did have to dish out $70 to FedEx to overnight it to NH. What was funny was that I received a card from Ruger the day AFTER I got my revolver back saying that they had just received my gun and gave a reference number if I had any questions about its repair! Were your pistol mine, I would call Ruger and get it back to them. They may even pay for your shipping. I'd rather have it gone a couple of weeks and have it right than have it at home and not be right.

mooner
June 10, 2011, 06:24 PM
Maybe I am missing something but to me it is still galling. It does not matter if it was a burr or something else.

Yes you are missing something. A scratch is not galling. Galling occurs when two objects having the same metallurgical properties slide against each other. Small imperfections form and since the two materials have the same properties, they both give a little bit. This creates material transfer. the material transfer creates more imperfections or "bumps" and "gouges". In the interest of brevity, this is extremely simplified

The slide is harder than the frame which prevents galling.

Galling is a much more serious problem.

Apocalypse-Now
June 10, 2011, 07:33 PM
if you send it in to ruger, keep in mind they kept many people's SR9's for months until they figured out how to fix the drop fire issue.

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